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Thriller

The Spy Who Loved Me epub ebook

by Rufus Sewell,Samantha Bond,Ian Fleming

The Spy Who Loved Me epub ebook

Author: Rufus Sewell,Samantha Bond,Ian Fleming
Category: Thrillers & Suspense
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Audiobooks; Abridged edition edition (April 4, 2002)
ISBN: 0141802987
ISBN13: 978-0141802985
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 250
Other formats: docx mbr lit azw


Home Ian Fleming The Spy Who Loved M. Part of James Bond series by Ian Fleming. Right out of a book-and what a book! Dear Diary! Well, people couldn't come much Worse, and now they'd gone.

Home Ian Fleming The Spy Who Loved Me. Home. The spy who loved me, .

The Spy Who Loved Me is the ninth novel in Ian Fleming's James Bond series, first published by Jonathan Cape on 16 April 1962. It is the shortest and most sexually explicit of Fleming's novels, as well as a clear departure from previous Bond novels in that the story is told in the first person by a young Canadian woman, Vivienne Michel. Bond himself does not appear until two-thirds of the way through the book.

What Fleming gives us is Viv, a young Canadian whom we again learn very little about other than she's . This is the point in the book when I no longer asked myself if Fleming lost his mind, but whether he had one in the first place.

What Fleming gives us is Viv, a young Canadian whom we again learn very little about other than she's been in some seriously messed up relationships. And as if this wasn't sick enough, it actually got worse: I think I know why I gave myself so completely to this man, how I was capable of it with someone I had met only six hours before.

The Spy Who Loved Me. Ian Fleming. This book, written in the first person, posits that Bond was a real person about whom Ian Fleming wrote a series of adventures. In 1977, the Eon Productions film The Spy Who Loved Me was released and, due to the radical differences between the film and the original novel of the same name, Eon productions authorised a novelization, James Bond, The Spy Who Loved Me.

Ian Fleming, in full Ian Lancaster Fleming, was a suspense-fiction novelist whose character James Bond, the stylish, high-living British secret service agent 007, who became one of the most successful and widely imitated heroes of 20th-century popular fiction

Ian Fleming, in full Ian Lancaster Fleming, was a suspense-fiction novelist whose character James Bond, the stylish, high-living British secret service agent 007, who became one of the most successful and widely imitated heroes of 20th-century popular fiction. The son of a Conservative MP and the grandson of a Scottish banker, Fleming was born into a family of wealth and privilege.

AUDIO BOOK Ian Fleming DR NO read by Rufus Sewell on 2 x Cass JAMES BOND. Goldfinger and the spy who loved m. udio book CD. £1. 0. Format: Audio CD. or Best Offer

AUDIO BOOK Ian Fleming DR NO read by Rufus Sewell on 2 x Cass JAMES BOND. or Best Offer. Type: AudiobookAuthor: Ian Fleming. New listingJames Bond 007 Audio Book Collection - 23 CDs Ian Fleming-4 Complete Stories set.

Now Playing Ian Fleming's James Bond. After just finishing rereading "Dr. No" and "From Russia with Love" I was ready for something different from Fleming, and this book certainly is that. The story is told with flashbacks from the perspective of the young French-Canadian woman Vivienne Michel. During the first part of the book Vivienne's character is well developed, with much more detail and nuance than for female characters in the other Bond books that I have read. I don't know whether a woman would find Vivienne's character credible, but I certainly did.

The earliest audio-book adaptations were a 1981 series of abridged readings of four novels by Ian Ogilvy, an actor known at the time for playing Simon Templar in the TV series Return of the Saint and reportedly one of the candidates to replace Roger.

The earliest audio-book adaptations were a 1981 series of abridged readings of four novels by Ian Ogilvy, an actor known at the time for playing Simon Templar in the TV series Return of the Saint and reportedly one of the candidates to replace Roger Moore as Bond. They were produced by Music for Pleasure Ltd. and were abridged by Donald Bancroft. They were re-issued outside of the UK in 1984.

Ian Lancaster Fleming (1908–1964) was an English author, journalist and naval intelligence officer who is best known for his James Bond series of spy novels. James Bond is a British Secret Service agent and often referred to by his code name, 007. Thriller & Crime Espionage. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Читателю выпадает редкая возможность взглянуть на непобедимого агента 007 глазами влюбленной в него молодой женщины, канадки Вивьен Мишель, оказавшейся втянутой в противостояние британской МИ-6, КГБ и неуловимого СПЕКТРа

Читателю выпадает редкая возможность взглянуть на непобедимого агента 007 глазами влюбленной в него молодой женщины, канадки Вивьен Мишель, оказавшейся втянутой в противостояние британской МИ-6, КГБ и неуловимого СПЕКТРа.

In an attempt to escape her tangled past, Vivienne Michel has run away to the American backwoods and is in grave danger. Winding up at the Dreamy Pines Motor Court - a far cry from the privileged world she was born to - Vivienne finds herself in the company of two hardened killers: the perverse Sol Horror and the deadly Sluggsy Morant. When a coolly charismatic Englishman turns up, Viv, now in terrible danger, is not just hopeful, she is fascinated. Because he is James Bond, 007; the man she hopes will save her, the spy she hopes will love her...
Reviews (7)
Prinna
Note: This review discloses some details about how the book ends (as usual the good guys win and the bad guys lose).

After just finishing rereading "Dr. No" and "From Russia with Love" I was ready for something different from Fleming, and this book certainly is that. The story is told with flashbacks from the perspective of the young French-Canadian woman Vivienne Michel. During the first part of the book Vivienne's character is well developed, with much more detail and nuance than for female characters in the other Bond books that I have read. I don't know whether a woman would find Vivienne's character credible, but I certainly did. In the middle of the book two gangsters show up at the deserted motel where Vivienne acts as temporary caretaker, and I found their characters to be completely credible and genuinely creepy. Up to this point the book is an excellent mystery of the "damsel-in-distress" type.

When James Bond shows up and the "action/adventure" portion of the book begins, I started to fell a little disappointed. The gunfight at the burning motel is stereotypic, and after the "bad guys" are suitably dispatched Bond and Vivienne head for the sack. Vivienne doesn't get the role of heroine here, but she does pretty well for someone who has been coshed earlier in the evening. Bond on the other hand is not at his best: why did he not think to have Sluggsy and Horror kneel before asking Vivienne to disarm them? Why did he ask her to move between him and the gangsters?

The contrast between how Vivienne and the other characters are handled highlighted a feature of the Bond books that I hadn't thought about when caught up in the action: Fleming's bad guys are a little cartoonish, sometimes resembling the villains that Dick Tracy had to contend with (e.g., Coffyhead, Flyface, Wormy Marron). Sluggsy and Horror are a little like that, but people like them still might plausibly jump out at you from a dark alley.

I was left wondering what would become of Vivienne. Was Bond really an improvement over Derek and Kurt? Is it her tragic flaw that she is doomed to a series of relationships with guys like that? The ending makes me wonder whether she will ever break out of this pattern.

Braendo
The people giving this book a poor review (1-star? Really?) clearly aren't open to experimentation in writing. After the prior nine novels, where Bond is troubled, reckless, but ultimately an unstoppable force to the people around him, it's interesting to read a novel from someone else's perspective to see just how people view him. It's like reading a first hand account of someone who meets this whirlwind of a human, and it's fantastic. The first third of the novel functions as way to create an attachment to a regular young woman who will one day be on a collision course with 007. The second act raises the stakes and introduces the palpable threat of two psychotic thugs that pose a plausible threat to her (and Bond, for anyone who pays attention to the type of mortal danger these men represent). The third act introduces Bond in a very mythological sort of way, as he appears under cover of night to even the odds. Anyone who's read Bond novels before knows that even small time thugs are a threat to him because he isn't as cartoonishly calm and immortal as he is in the films. He's just more clever and better trained than others. Having low level crooks, rather than SPECTRE elite, be the foil makes sense because they would be to this woman, and Bond is uniquely suited to intervene. Her story is rather cliché, but nothing that wouldn't compose the plot of an indie or foreign romance story, and it's more impressive that it came from Fleming, who by this point had already devolved from a fairly progressive writer in the 50s to a downright misogynistic one in the 60s. Bond's still a white knight figure, and fairly two-dimensional here, but at least it makes sense being from someone else's perspective. In the handful of books prior, he went from being a complex character with very real and respectable views of women and the world around him, but by the 60s, he had become the woman smacking clown that appears in the films. The nature of the story redeems Fleming somewhat, in that he at least attempted to tell a woman's story where she wasn't just an object to be bedded, even if he falls back on his own trope of her ending up a (nigh) rape victim. Overall, it's a jarring, but welcome experience that is served tremendously by being read after all the prior novels build the myth that is literally displayed before this woman's eyes.

Ndyardin
This was the second time I've read the book (the first being when I was in my mid-teens, many years ago). It's been interesting to see how attitudes and customs have changed and how they've stayed the same over the years. The thugs speak in slang common to the gangster movies of that era, and the attitudes towards women are quite accurate for that time. However, that too human feeling of being caught in a situation beyond one's control is just as universal now as when the book was written. Even though this is not anything like his other Bond books, I found the story just as enjoyable as when I read it the first time. Kudos to Mr. Fleming for trying something different.

Drelajurus
This one is OK, but it definitely is NOT one of Ian Fleming's better James Bond novels (and I've read them all). The famed 007 doesn't show up until later in the story, his character is not as well-developed, there are none of the fantastic techno-gadgets or spy-craft of found in the other Bond novels, and frankly, the heroine of the story is kind of a pitiful lost soul; it's hard to root for her. It was a nice break from usual non-fiction reading fare, though.

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