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Thriller

The Da Vinci Legacy epub ebook

by L. Perdue

The Da Vinci Legacy epub ebook

Author: L. Perdue
Category: Thrillers & Suspense
Language: English
Publisher: Pinnacle (June 1, 1988)
ISBN: 1558171185
ISBN13: 978-1558171183
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 484
Other formats: rtf azw doc txt


The Da Vinci Legacy: The ORIGINAL Leonardo and Religion Thriller. One 'Da Vinci' has sold millions, the other is little known. Lewis Perdue alleges the popular novel has his book to thank. San Francisco Chronicle. Correction to Chronicle Article.

The Da Vinci Legacy: The ORIGINAL Leonardo and Religion Thriller. A conversation with lewis perdue about his bestsellers. Q. With All the bestsellers you have had, you must be rich, right? A. I only wish.

The Da Vinci Legacy book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

The Da Vinci Legacy authors Jean-Pierre Isbouts and Christopher .

The Da Vinci Legacy authors Jean-Pierre Isbouts and Christopher Heath Brown tell us in their new book that Leonardo’s painting of the myth of Leda and the Swan.

A Tom Doherty Associates book.

Leonardo, da Vinci, 1452-1519, Forgery of manuscripts. A Tom Doherty Associates book.

Lewis Perdue (born on May 1st, 1949 in Greenwood, Mississippi) is the author of 20 published books including Daughter of God, and The Da Vinci Legacy. Perdue was sued by Random House in 2003 when he charged that Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code plagiarized those two books. Perdue was sued by Random House in 2003 when he charged that Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code plagiarized those two books Life. Perdue was born in the Mississippi Delta in 1949, to. He was reportedly expelled from the University of Mississippi in 1967 for leading a civil rights march.

But Erikson is not the only one seeking the missing pages. He soon finds himself the target of a murderous conspiracy that dates back to the dawn of Christianity itself. For the Da Vinci Codex is more than just a precious document. It is also the key to a long-lost discovery of frightening importance. Now, not only Erikson's life but the future itself is at stake.

Lewis Perdue (born on May 1st, 1949 in Greenwood, Mississippi) is the author of 20 published books including Daughter of God, and The Da Vinci Legacy

Lewis Perdue (born on May 1st, 1949 in Greenwood, Mississippi) is the author of 20 published books including Daughter of God, and The Da Vinci Legacy. Random House won the lawsuit but lost their demand to have Perdue pay their legal fees.

For the Da Vinci Codex is more than just a precious document

But Erikson is not the only one seeking the missing pages.

Da Vinci scholar Vance Erikson discovers a forgery and missing pages in a Da Vinci Codex that makes his a target of. .Anyway, Perdue had a couple more bestsellers, including The Da Vinci Legacy then seemed to disappear until The Linz Testament came out.

Da Vinci scholar Vance Erikson discovers a forgery and missing pages in a Da Vinci Codex that makes his a target of a mysterious Catholic brotherhood who has killed four other Da Vinci scholars. The murders take Erikson on a fast-paced sprint through Europe one step ahead of the killers and the law who have fingered him as the killer of at. least one of the dead da davinci scholars, Dr. Martini who has written his last message in his own blood. Erikson hooks up with an undercover CIA agent whose cover is as a fine arts expert.

The Da Vinci Legacy - Lewis Perdue. The Da Vinci Legacy - Lewis Perdue.

The Lost Mysteries of LeonardoThe Da Vinci Codex is a priceless collection of Leonardo's original work-- or is it? When Da Vinci scholar Vance Erikson discovers that several of the Codex's pages are forgeries, the search is on for the genuine documents, which may hold startling secrets and revelations.But Erikson is not the only one seeking the missing pages. He soon finds himself the target of a murderous conspiracy that dates back to the dawn of Christianity itself. For the Da Vinci Codex is more than just a precious document. It is also the key to a long-lost discovery of frightening importance. Now, not only Erikson's life but the future itself is at stake. Ultimate power is the prize for whomever seizes ...The Da Vinci LegacyFirst published in 1983, The Da Vinci Legacy is an engrossing international thriller.
Reviews (7)
Tygrarad
This book was originally released in 1983, then was tweaked for a re-release in 2004 amongst all the DaVinci Code hubbub. However, this book lacks the cultural and historical awe of Brown's famous novel and a number of others who jumped on the religious conspiracy-theory type novel bandwagon. Purdue tries to fit in too much action and not enough character development or history, leaving DaVinci himself to take a backseat to international politics and economics. Plus, while Purdue tries to update his book for the 21st century (euros, Iraq war, 9/11) he fails to make other necessary adjustments, which leave the timeline inconsistent and half of the narrative stuck in the early 80's.

The hero, Vance has a background in the military, while being a rogue oil locater and the most experienced amateur DaVinci scholar in the world. Um, how convenient for a guy like him to have so many obscure skills. His accomplice in the adventure is enemy reporter turned lover, Suzanne, who happens to be an ex-spy, another set of useful abilities to go along with Vance's as they dodge bullets, make narrow escapes, and add to the body count. And though Suzanne still holds a grudge for being spurned by Lance in college, the immediacy of their professions of love seem a bit implausible.

The only moderately fascinating plot point was the mystery behind the secret organization, which wields uncanny power and has a bizarre if fanciful history. But the captivating things that should have been more elaborately portrayed fell short. There is not enough about DaVinci and the religious aspects of the plot. It tries too hard to be about international conspiracy that is so far reaching it seems ridiculous. While Purdue tried to capitalize on a hot topic that was revitalized in fiction, he would have been better off completely re-writing the book and thoroughly revising the sub-par dialogue, rethinking the poor decisions made by the characters, completely modernizing it, and developing the plot to be more engaging.

felt boot
I just finished Lewis Purdue's The da Vinci Legacy after several jerky starts. No matter how many times I started it, I was unable to find the hook, the interesting thing that would pull me in and keep me reading. After 400 pages, I still had not found it.
I don't think it has escaped anyone's notice that Purdue's publishers, sitting on a cache of awful books for the last twenty years, became aware that Dan Brown's similarly -named and -themed book had skyrocketed to the top of the bestseller charts. "Hey," the must have thought to themselves. "We have some books that just might sell now that someone else has cracked the elusive Da Vinci conspiracy market." So Purdue's books were reissued (with an appropriate bump in retail price) and released upon an unsuspecting and gullible public. By which I mean me.
What the publishers failed to recognize, however, is that Dan Brown is able to tell a story with words on paper (he's a bad writer, but his storytelling skills are top-notch). Purdue, on the other hand, would have difficulty writing a Mad-lib and making it interesting.
It's rare to come across a writer as ham-fisted and inept as Purdue, whose heroes are manly and capable, whose villains are purest evil and whose plotting is nearly non-existent. Vance Erickson, the main hero, is an everyday joe who just happens to be able to find oil where no one else can and who also just happens to be one of the world's foremost amateur Da Vinci scholars. Lucky, then, that it is he and no other who comes across the bogus codex and recognizes it for what it is. Suzanne Storm is a reporter for a fluffy culture magazine who also happens to be a former CIA operative. In true hammy heroic fashion, the two, who initially can't stand one another, fall in love after the first gun battle.
The villains are a band of excommunicated Catholic monks who seem to be behind every famous missing-persons case in history. They want the codex so they can work their nefarious evil by turning its contents into the most powerful weapon ever created. Apparently they were extremely competent until the present, when they keep conking Vance on the head and storing him in locked rooms from which he escapes easily, instead of just killing him. That's the whole of the suspense in this book; Vance getting conked on the head and escaping.
In other areas, Purdue's writing is just plain embarrassing to read. His exposition reads like he simply transcribed a Who's Who entry. His romantic pronouncements are as real and heart-felt as a teenaged girl's. His action sequences are so dull I had to physically restrain myself from flipping forward.
There are many, many better ways to spend your time than with this book. Try plucking all the hairs out of your arm with tweezers: it's bound to be more interesting and rewarding than reading a Lewis Purdue novel.

Tholmeena
With all the interest now in Da Vinci, due to Dan Brown's novel, I was immediately grabbed by the title of this book. Where Brown's novel is a well-researched (though sometimes questionable) grabber from the start, this book is a little slow and doesn't seem to present anything new to the Da Vinci legend.
Vance Erickson, a person who specializes in locating oil, for some reason is also an expert in Leonardo Da Vinci and somehow located a missing diary that was misfiled in a library and gives enough details to show that several pages of a Da Vinci codex (which happens to be owned by Erickson's employer) are fake. This seems to set-off a whole upheaval among a religious fanatical sect, who start killing anyone who might have seen the forged Codex pages.
As Erickson goes looking for those people, he finds out they have just been killed or the killers are still there and try to take out Erickson. Erickson seems to escape, not by his efforts but by others including someone who has held a grudge against Erickson for showing him up in a college football game several years earlier.
What muddles this book even more is that at the beginning of the book, Erickson is being verbally attacked by a good-looking female art critic at a symposium he is given. You immediately know that they will somehow be thrown together and literally kiss and make-up.
This book is not long, but it took me a long time to finish. Whereas, The Da Vinci Code only took me a few days to read. I suggest just reading that book and skipping this one.

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