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Alexandria (Marcus Didius Falco Mysteries) epub ebook

by Lindsey Davis

Alexandria (Marcus Didius Falco Mysteries) epub ebook

Author: Lindsey Davis
Category: Mystery
Language: English
Publisher: Minotaur Books; First Edition edition (May 12, 2009)
Pages: 352 pages
ISBN: 0312379013
ISBN13: 978-0312379018
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 509
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ALEXANDRIA catches us up with Falco's boisterous circle of family and friends and, while the mystery itself tends to drag at times, Davis does throw in several neat and interesting moments. There are, of course, those moments of Falco and Helena Justina just working their magic together or Falco acting the proud exhausted papa.

I don't read too many historical mysteries, but I do admit to snatching up each Marcus Didius Falco adventure as it comes out. I like Marcus Didius Falco very much. A cynical, lowborn, wisecracking private eye (or "informer") holding it down in 1st Century Rome, the guy would absolutely feel at home in, say, the mean streets of Los Angeles.

The Jupiter Myth (Marcus Didius Falco Mysteries Book 14). Lindsey Davis. ALEXANDRIA catches us up with Falco's boisterous circle of family and friends and, while the mystery itself tends to drag at times, Davis does throw in several neat and interesting moments

The Jupiter Myth (Marcus Didius Falco Mysteries Book 14). A Body in the Bathhouse (Marcus Didius Falco Mysteries Book 13). ALEXANDRIA catches us up with Falco's boisterous circle of family and friends and, while the mystery itself tends to drag at times, Davis does throw in several neat and interesting moments.

Marcus Didius Falco is the fictional central character and narrator in a series of historical mystery crime novels by Lindsey Davis. Using the concepts of modern detective stories (with Falco as the private investigator, roughly translated into the classical world as a delator or "private informer"), the novels portray the world of the Roman Empire under Vespasian. The tone is arch and satirical, but the historical setting is largely accurate.

Marcus Didius Falco is a private investigator working in first century Rome. He's described as 'Roman Emperor Vespasian's smart-aleck PI'. Marcus Didius Falco is a private investigator working in first century Rome. Falco moves around Rome's empire, working for hire even in Roman Britain. Series also known as: Marco Didio Falco.

Lindsey Davis is well known for her Marcus Didius Falco historical mysteries and this one is number nineteen in the series. From the back cover: "In A. D. 77 Marcus Didius Falco, private informer and stalwart Roman citizen, undertakes one of the most fearsome tasks known to man-he goes on vacation with his somewhat pregnant wife, Helena Justina, and their family.

Year Published: 2000. Shadows in Bronze mdf-2 (Marcus Didius Falco #2). Year Published: 2006. Year Published: 1991. Year Published: 2013.

PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS. Marcus Didius Falco – fixer, traveller and playwright. I had no patience with mystery features myself, so I turned back into the room and looked around.

Lindsey Davis Alexandria PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS Marcus Didius Falco – fixer, traveller and playwrightHelena Justina – his well-read wife and tour-plannerJulia Junilla, Sosia Favonia, Flavia Albia – their well-behaved poppetsAulus Camillus Aelianus – Helena's brother, a diligent studentFulvius – Falco's enigmatic uncle, a negotiatorCassius – his life partner, a wonderful hostM. PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS.

Lindsey Davis was born and raised in Birmingham, England. Her internationally bestselling novels featuring ancient Roman detective Marcus Didius Falco include Venus in Copper, The Iron Hand of Mars, and Nemesis. After taking an English degree at Oxford and working for the civil service for thirteen years, she "ran away to be a writer. She is also the author of Rebels and Traitors, set during the English Civil War. Davis is the recipient of the Crime Writers' Association Cartier Diamond Dagger Award, the highest accolade for crime writers, as well as the Ellis Peters Historical.

Электронная книга "Alexandria: A Marcus Didius Falco Novel", Lindsey Davis

Электронная книга "Alexandria: A Marcus Didius Falco Novel", Lindsey Davis. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Alexandria: A Marcus Didius Falco Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In first century A.D. Rome, during the reign of Vespasian, Marcus Didius Falco works as a private “informer,” often for the emperor, ferreting out hidden truths and bringing villains to ground. But even informers take vacations with their wives, so in A.D. 77, Falco and his wife, Helena Justina, with others in tow, travel to Alexandria, Egypt. But they aren’t there long before Falco finds himself in the midst of nefarious doings—when the Librarian of the great library is found dead, under suspicious circumstances. Falco quickly finds himself on the trail of dodgy doings, malfeasance, deadly professional rivalry, more bodies and the lowest of the low—book thieves! As the bodies pile up, it’s up to Falco to untangle this horrible mess and restore order to a disordered universe.
Reviews (7)
Jelar
I don't read too many historical mysteries, but I do admit to snatching up each Marcus Didius Falco adventure as it comes out. I like Marcus Didius Falco very much. A cynical, lowborn, wisecracking private eye (or "informer") holding it down in 1st Century Rome, the guy would absolutely feel at home in, say, the mean streets of Los Angeles. I have been onboard with Lindsey Davis's fantastic long-running series ever since The Silver Pigs: A Marcus Didius Falco Mystery (Marcus Didius Falco Mysteries), the one which introduced Falco and his great love, the incomparable Senator's daughter Helena Justina.

Time's snuck up, brother, twenty years have passed since SILVER PIGS first graced the bookstore shelves. ALEXANDRIA is already the 19th entry, and, as chronicled in his past adventures, life-changing things have befallen Falco. That's one of the many things that I like about the series, that Lindsey Davis allows development and growth in her characters. In interior chronology, seven years have elapsed from the events in SILVER PIGS to this latest, ALEXANDRIA. Falco has certainly flourished, having gone from being merely a seedy informer from the Aventine ghettos - "informing" being generally regarded as a pretty contemptible vocation - to now flaunting a sort of middle-class respectability (although he's still very much an informer, and still despised in certain quarters). Falco is now a family man, having married the brilliant Helena Justina some time ago and now father to two young girls, an adopted teenaged girl, and one mangy dog. His social status has been elevated not only by his marriage to a Senator's daughter and his purchase of his new social ranking, but also by his taking on occasional troubleshooting missions for the Emperor. Falco is older, wiser, and perhaps more tactful. But he's still got that quick wit and that sarcasm down. As ever, Helena Justina is his match, banter for banter and clue for clue.

It's Spring in the year 77 A.D. and Falco, Helena Justina (who is four or five months pregnant) and their immediate family are off on a holiday jaunt to the legendary city of Alexandria, Egypt - Egypt then being a province of the vast Roman Empire. Throughout the novel Falco hints that there may possibly be a smidgen of government work involved, although when he does 'fess up, this so-called assignment turns out to be fairly anticlimactic. But it's this cloak of Imperial authority which lands Falco in yet another murder mystery, and this one of the locked room persuasion. When the Librarian of the Great Library of Alexandria passes away behind closed doors, and the investigating centurion finds himself baffled, the Pass the Buck routine is on as Falco gets tapped to take over the investigation, thanks to his being regarded as an imperial specialist.

The bulk of the book has Falco tiredly navigating his way thru a maze of dirty politics, scholarly backstabbings, and sinister rivalries (apparently, the position of the Librarian is very prestigious and much coveted). But Falco's enquiries lead him to a disturbing discovery, that this perplexing murder (suicide?) may involve certain of his family members. It's par for the course that more corpses surface, and that Falco's life becomes endangered several times and that Helena Justina again proves herself invaluable. There is smuggling, and even a sultry widow who very quickly femme fatales her way onto the scene. There's even a mad inventor near the end. And, oh, also, Falco wrestles with a big honking crocodile.

In all these books featuring Marcus Didius Falco, the main draw has always been his interactions with Helena Justina; I've been invested in their relationship from the get-go, from when their romance was this compelling star-crossed thing to nowadays, when they've comfortably settled in. It's a bit weird, but I more or less regard this couple as the Nick and Nora Charles of the toga set (and there's even a dog, just not in this book). I like that they're equal partners, with Helena Justina just as witty and clever and fun and as fully capable of solving a case as her hubby. Falco, meanwhile, is my all-time favorite shamus in rumpled tunic and sandals. Falco and Helena Justina feel like contemporary characters, with Falco's strong voice providing the first-person narrative and serving as tour guide to an ancient Rome that is so richly detailed that it feels quite convincing and real. For me, the murder case itself has always been of secondary importance, although, certainly, it's fun to see Falco work his way thru his list of suspects while dishing out his patented volley of wisecracks.

I really liked ALEXANDRIA, but then again I like all of the Falco novels. As ever Lindsey Davis blends contemporary diction with 1st Century vernacular, this serving to make the readers feel at ease instead of possibly having said readers suspect that a deadly dull ancient history class has been snuck on them. ALEXANDRIA catches us up with Falco's boisterous circle of family and friends and, while the mystery itself tends to drag at times, Davis does throw in several neat and interesting moments. There are, of course, those moments of Falco and Helena Justina just working their magic together or Falco acting the proud exhausted papa. But one fascinating sequence which really sticks to the mind and gives a sliver of insight into the early Egyptian mindset is that of the Zoo Keeper conducting an autopsy (or "necropsy"), a course of action universally deemed to be grossly, morally offensive. Even an ex-soldier like Falco, on viewing the dissection, has to regain his composure. And, for the reluctant tourists out there, while Helena Justina is the eternally studious scholar and endlessly eager to view famous landmarks, I'm more in line with Falco's "Okay, we've seen it; can we go home now?" attitude, their respective behavior demonstrated near the end as they visit the Pyramids of Giza and the Sphinx. And, again, there's Falco and that croc.

I'm not much of a history buff, so I can't say word one concerning the accuracy or inaccuracy of ancient Roman/Egyptian history as submitted by the author. But I will say that Lindsey Davis is hell on wheels with telling a story, is a marvel with character development and with keeping the central characters' romance alive and fresh, and that the fabled city of Alexandria, under her pen, is rendered vivid and well-realized. And as for the characters themselves, well, Falco, Helena Justina and their fractious lot have been living, breathing folks to me for the past twenty years. With ALEXANDRIA, Lindsey Davis again doesn't let us down. What a fine writer she is.

Beazerdred
Against the backdrop of ancient Roman Alexandria, in the shadow of the Pharos lighthouse and the Great Library, Marcus Didius Falco undertakes a new murder investigation. Falco finds himself becoming uncomfortably familiar with the scholars of the library as he searches for the killer of the library head. Davis again delivers a first rate mystery while familiarizing the reader with the people and customs of the Egyptian city. Falco remains the observer of seedy living with his wry, often hilarious comments, with his wife Helena Justina at his side.in this 19th entry in the Falco series. Highly recommended.

Inabel
Once again Falco ends up in the middle of a murder and a mystery. On a family vacation to Egypt, he is "asked" by the Roman Prefect to look into the "death" of the head of the Great Library of Alexandria, at that time the largest collection of writings in the world. Falco knows that the government is simply pushing this on to him so that, if he fails, they can blame him, a foreigner. At that time there was quite a bit of anti-Roman felling in Egypt, a period of time only about 30 years after Marc Antony and Cleopatra lost the battle of Actium to Augustus.

Falco and his brother-in-law begin looking into the death, and the circumstances surrounding it, thereby stirring up a whole lot of trouble, and people. There appear to be secrets that many people want to keep quiet, and Falco is trying to turn over their rocks. There are other deaths, one particularly gruesome, before Falco sorts everything out, just as he is preparing to leave for home. There is one last task to be done, and this task very nearly causes Falco to lose his life. In the end, all is well, and our hero ends up back in Rome in one piece.

As usual in this series the writing is first rate, and the sly and subtle humor keeps the reader chuckling along with the plot, even when it turns somewhat nasty. May the author, and Falco, live long and bring us more mysteries, and enjoyment!

salivan
This is one of the slowest mystery novels that I have read in a long time. The beginning presents a curious death which leads one to believe this is what the story will center around. It does, but only sort of. This book is really about a time in the life of a Roman detective in Alexandria Egypt. Since I like history, I found this quite interesting. The mystery part is disappointing since it develops very very slowly and in reality there isn't much detective work actually happening. The mysteries (yes, more do occur) are solved in the end but not by the typical Sherlock Holmes deductive reasoning method but more by luck and intimidation.

If you are a Marcus fan or a history buff, then you will probably like this book.
However, if you are a conventional mystery novel reader who expects a fast paced action novel, you will not like this book. If you are a Sherlock Holmes fan then most likely you will not like this novel. If you like any of the modern day detectives/stories then most likely you will not like this novel.

Dreladred
Alexandria was one of the better stories in the Falco series. It saw Falco and family being drawn into an investigation into the possible murder of the chief librarian of the Great Library. The book is filled with a mriad of historical tidbits which helps a basic plotline to be better than it really was. Personally, that is what I look for in these books. If it doesn't have the right window dressings, I'm not inclined to read it. This book has it. It includes everything from how diverse things were at the Library to the political situation in Egypt to the streets being lit and the weather. Overall, it was a good story and I enjoyed it.

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