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Thriller

Lie In The Dark epub ebook

by Dan Fesperman

Lie In The Dark epub ebook

Author: Dan Fesperman
Category: Mystery
Language: English
Publisher: Black Swan (July 5, 2004)
Pages: 384 pages
ISBN: 0552772682
ISBN13: 978-0552772686
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 681
Other formats: lrf txt mbr rtf


Had the gravediggers ever paused to gaze back on these mornings, they would have made out the thin shape of a man in his early thirties, draped in dark clothes

Had the gravediggers ever paused to gaze back on these mornings, they would have made out the thin shape of a man in his early thirties, draped in dark clothes. Slender to begin with, Vlado had been further narrowed by the diet of wartime until his deep brown eyes were almost spectral in their sockets.

Lie In The Dark book. Dan Fesperman knew whereof he wrote in this book. He served in Berlin as a journalist with the Baltimore Sun, covering Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia during their wars. Investigator Petric makes his living from the dead. Lie in the Dark'is the first outing for Vlado Petric, a police Investigator based in besieged, be-rubbled Sarajevo.

Dan Fesperman's police procedural, LIE IN THE DARK, was first published in 1999. It is a powerful story about a Bosnian homicide detective, Investigator Petric, who tries to solve crimes while staying. Пользовательский отзыв - jayne charles - LibraryThing. This book is highly instructive about a war that occurred in recent years, it features some finely constructed characters and is written in competent style Читать весь отзыв.

Vlado Petric, a former homicide detective in Sarajevo, is now living in exile, and making a meagre living working at a Berlin construction site, when an American investigator for the International War Crimes Tribunal recruits him to return home on a mission. The assignment sounds simple enough. But after a terrific debut (Lie in the Dark, 1999), subsequent works have gradually grown more cerebral and less thrilling-and this latest effort is hamstrung by both a surplus of expository dialogue and by curiously old-fashioned prose (Lockhart, allegedly American, exclaims Good Lord! and calls other men fellows and scoundrels ).

Hrnic had gone, presumably back to the market, off without a further word to tend his business.

Hrnic had gone, presumably back to the market, off without a further word to tend his business ht direction toward the bridge that would take him toward the Jewish Community Center. What he needed most right now was a drink, a jolt of something to stop the wild gyrations of his imagination. He’d heard stories about being shaken down like that, of course. Heard the ways they found out information and used it against you.

Dan Fesperman, a journalist who reported from a number of war zones, has written a masterful murder mystery in the vein of early le Carré and Graham Greene. Vlado Petric is a homicide investigator in war-torn Sarajevo

Dan Fesperman, a journalist who reported from a number of war zones, has written a masterful murder mystery in the vein of early le Carré and Graham Greene. Vlado Petric is a homicide investigator in war-torn Sarajevo. When he encounters an unidentified body near "sniper alley," he realizes that it is the body of Esmir Vitas, chief of the Interior Ministry's special police, and that Vitas has been killed not by any sniper's aim but by a bullet fired at almost pointblank range.

Lie in the Dark" is the first Dan Fesperman novel to feature Vlado Petric, and I'm happy to say it's not the last. I love the strangeness of trying to solve a murder in the midst of a civil war, and Fesperman re-creates the atmosphere of Sarajevo in a wonderful manner.

It’s been almost 12 years since Dan Fesperman wrote Lie in the Dark and we were excited to see that the title is being re-released, this time in paperback, by Soho Press. Dan is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun and a published author of several thrillers

It’s been almost 12 years since Dan Fesperman wrote Lie in the Dark and we were excited to see that the title is being re-released, this time in paperback, by Soho Press. Dan is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun and a published author of several thrillers. His plots are usually inspired by the his international assignments in countries such as Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, and Germany. Lie In The Dark, even after more than a decade, is still a vivid and beautifully written story. A Brief Summary: Vlado Petric is a homicide investigator in war-torn Sarajevo.

Investigator Petric makes his living from the dead. Lately business has been slow, what with the siege around Sarajevo. Condoned killing has displaced the crime of passion; his services with the civil police as a homicide investigator have been less in demand. Unluckily one premeditated death does land on the detective's desk. It is no abused lover or a distant sniper's victim but a government official - the chief of the interior ministry's police - shot dead at close range.In a thriller that recalls the first excitement of Martin Cruz Smith's Moscow and the Vienna of Graham Greene's The Third Man, author Dan Fesperman brilliantly renders the fragmented society and underworld of Sarajevo at war - the freelancing gangsters, guilty bystanders, drop-in correspondents, the bureaucrats frightened for their jobs and very lives - and he weaves through this torn cityscape one man's desperate, deadly pursuit of the wrong people in the worst places.
Reviews (7)
Alianyau
From the first page the author conveys the claustrophobic and dangerous city that was Sarajevo in 1993. He does this extremely well by drawing on his experience as a war zone journalist. I love the historical mystery genre and those who contribute to it like Philip Kerr, Rennie Airth, Olen Steinhauer and now, Dan Fesperman. The fractured Yugoslavia is a complex canvass for a murder mystery but the author educates as he entertains.

Fesperman ably shows the local population and their resolve to weather a terrible existence. In the midst of the snipers, shelling, black market, gangs, and many other hardships, we are introduced to Vlado Petric one of the two remaining homicide detectives in Sarajevo. Of course, the irony of investigating murders during ethnic cleansing is lost on no one. It works as a crime novel, an indictment of the ineffectual U.N., and an introduction to the history of a disintegrated Yugoslavia. I am looking forward to the other Petric mysteries Fesperman has since turned out.

Ienekan
Excellent who done it with a backdrop in Bosnia. Much interesting information about the war in that location and the hardships experienced by the Serbs and Croats. Well written

Galanjov
A gloomy book for a gloomy subject. The plot is complex, but seems to make its many twists and turns just to make the reader pay attention. After a while, it became tedious. In essence, "Trust no one."

Virtual
I love all of his books

Connorise
It's OK

Arador
Sarajevo, 1994. Two years into the seige on the city, death has become routine. For Investigator Vlado Petric, work consists mostly of confirming those who have died as a result of the mess the city has become. However, when a member of the Interior Ministry of Police, Emir Vitas, is found dead one evening, Vlado is convinced that it isn't the work of a sniper on the hills. The man was murdered, and Petric is tasked with finding the killer.

There are several forces at work: members of the Interior Ministry themselves, anxious to prove to the world that Bosnia can handle her own problems; U.N. soldiers and inspectors, who are reluctant to take sides in the war that is seemingly going on without an end in sight; Vlado's partner on the police, Damir, who is trying to learn how to be a cop in the middle of a war; and the citizens of Sarajevo who have had to adjust to a strange way of life. Initially Petric thinks that the killing may have had to do with black market supplies of meat or cigarettes, which have become currency in the war-torn city. But the deeper he digs, the more he realizes that black market activities are the least of his worries. The death of Vitas seems to be linked to the art world, to smuggling that took place after World War II and is now happening again in the midst of everything else going on. And though normal life no longer exists in the war, it becomes imperative for Vlado to solve this crime.

"Lie in the Dark" is the first Dan Fesperman novel to feature Vlado Petric, and I'm happy to say it's not the last. I love the strangeness of trying to solve a murder in the midst of a civil war, and Fesperman re-creates the atmosphere of Sarajevo in a wonderful manner. I can't wait to read the next one!

6snake6
Sarajevo homicide investigator Vlado Petric finds his work almost as boring as his solitary life in Fesperman's debut. The siege of war has hammered the murder rate and the new special police grab any interesting cases. But the murder of the chief of the Interior Ministry's special police changes everything. The Ministry, making lofty noises about independent investigation, assigns the case to Petric.

Journalist Fesperman explores the underbelly of grim, wartorn Sarajevo - the daily privations and small defeats, like trading with foreign journalists for a jar of instant coffee, or the pang of resentment and contempt when the same journalist speaks casually of leaving. He lays out the mechanics of profit for the gangsters, black-marketers, government opportunists and schemers for whom war is a bounty.

Petric, whose morning routine begins with counting the gravediggers across the street ("his daily census of the war") never quite overcomes the irony of investigating one man's intriguing murder while other corpses pile up. But as the scraps of evidence draw him into danger, the murder becomes his obsession.

Fesperman's Sarajevo is rendered with powerful delicacy, insight and detail. The reader feels Petric's trapped longings for his wife, his old life, a normal day. People get by, a testament to human adaptability, but some - too many - feed greedily on the hardships of others. Fesperman brings all this to bear without making his story depressing or robbing it of suspense. The climax is a riveting, explosive page-turner.

This remains the most powerful of Fesperman's books - though all are incisive, thoughtful, suspenseful and highly recommended.

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