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Way We Die Now epub ebook

by Michael Z. Lewin

Way We Die Now epub ebook

Author: Michael Z. Lewin
Category: Mystery
Language: English
Publisher: Hamish Hamilton Ltd (February 1974)
Pages: 224 pages
ISBN: 0241024633
ISBN13: 978-0241024638
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 574
Other formats: txt mbr lrf azw


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The Way We Die Now. Michael Z. Lewin. Sure, he'd been a hero over there, but this was Indianapolis, and real life, and now. Real life is simple, right? Not this time, not when Samson discovers that his questions do not lead to satisfactory, or safe, answers.

Michael Zinn Lewin is an American writer of mystery fiction perhaps best known for his series about Albert . Another series, however, is set in Bath, England, where Lewin now lives. This features the Lunghis who run their detective agency as a family business.

Michael Zinn Lewin is an American writer of mystery fiction perhaps best known for his series about Albert Samson, a distinctly low-keyed, non-hardboiled private detective who plies his trade in Indianapolis, Indiana. Lewin himself grew up in Indianapolis, but after graduating from Harvard and living for a few years in New York City, has lived in England for the last 40 years. So far there are three novels and nine short stories about them.

Michael Zinn Lewin (born 1942, Springfield, Massachusetts) is an American writer . The Way We Die Now, Putnam, New York, 1973. The Enemies Within, Knopf, New York, 1974.

Michael Zinn Lewin (born 1942, Springfield, Massachusetts) is an American writer of mystery fiction perhaps best known for his series about Albert Samson, a distinctly low-keyed, non-hardboiled private detective who plies his trade in Indianapolis, Indiana. Lewin is the son of Leonard C. Lewin, author of the 1967 bestselling satire The Report from Iron Mountain: On the Possibility and Desirability of Peace.

Lewin, Michael Z. Publication date.

Home Lewin, Michael Z. The Way We Die No. In addition to our internet business, we operate a retail store specializing in rare books, original movie posters, celebrity autographs and other unique entertainment memorabilia

Home Lewin, Michael Z. The Way We Die Now. Lewin, Michael Z. Published by Putnam New York, 1973. From David Kaye Books & Memorabilia (Woodland Hills, CA, . In addition to our internet business, we operate a retail store specializing in rare books, original movie posters, celebrity autographs and other unique entertainment memorabilia. Visit Seller's Storefront.

It wasn't bad enough that a ten-year-old kid had beaten him at basketball in the morning. Next Albert Samson was being badgered by a humourless prospective client.

Books related to The Way We Die Now. Skip this list. More by Michael Z. The Way You Look Tonight. Likely to Die. Linda Fairstein.

Michael Z. Lewin Michael Z. Lewin

Lt. Leroy Powder, Indianapolis PD, investigates a series of gruesome murders and the disappearance of a teenage girl. He's just awoken from an office doze when a new client walks in.

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Reviews (2)
Mpapa
While New York City and Los Angeles are teeming with fictional private investigators, much of the rest of the country gets short shrift in that regard, including Indianapolis, whose only claim to detective fame might be Michael Z. Lewin’s Albert Samson, hero of “The Way We Die Now” and a series of other novels. Fortunately for the capital of the Hoosier state, Samson is quite a worthy and unconventional representative of the PI genre and “The Way We Die Now” is a worthy addition to the PI genre.

“The Way We Die Now” was written in 1973 and is the second Samson novel (and the first I’ve read). Surprisingly, other than some of dated technology technology, the novel seems quite fresh. Samson is hired by the wife of a security guard who’s been arrested for an on-the-job killing. There’s no question that he shot a man who was trying to serve some legal documents on a tenant in the building where the guard worked. But the guard claims the tenant told him that the victim was actually trying to assault the tenant and begged for help from the guard, a claim the tenant flatly denies. As Samson investigates the case, he discovers that the security guard, a former Vietnam vet, is probably suffering from PTSD and has some definite mental issues. He also discovers that the case isn’t nearly as simple as it first appears.

As mysteries go, “The Way We Die Now” isn’t all that mysterious. Most readers will be able to figure out what’s going on before the halfway point in the book. But knowing and proving are two different things, as Samson finds out, and he has to try to gather enough evidence to get his client out of jail. The way that Sampson tries to do this involves wearing the 1970’s version of a wire and literally hanging around outside a window in one of the bad guys’ home in the hopes that the villains will say something to incriminate themselves. That sequence, and the violence that follows, are one of the book’s few weak stretches.

Fortunately, author Lewin makes up for the relatively lackluster action sequences with some good descriptive writing and dialogue. Samson, who narrates “The Way We Die Now” is one of the old school cynical, world weary, nearly broke (his office doubles as his apartment and he gets hired because he’s the cheapest PI his client could find), sharp witted PI’s, who manages to exchange quips with unlikable sorts with the best of them. Surprisingly, those unlikable sorts don’t include the police, with whom Samson is on fairly good terms as a result of the events in Samson’s first book. It’s refreshing for the cops and PI to both realize they are on the same side in a book like this. Samson also makes it a point not to carry a gun, something else that distinguishes him from the crowd.

Those who enjoy a well-written traditional PI novel will like “The Way We Die Now.” The first person narration reads like 200 pages of often witty banter directly with the readers and the other characters Samson encounters. In addition, Lewin takes a brief but insightful look at the issue of PTSD, a topic as valid today as it was 40 years ago. “The Way We Die Now” is a great example of the way mystery authors should write now.

Landarn
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