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Blood on the Moon epub ebook

by James Ellroy

Blood on the Moon epub ebook

Author: James Ellroy
Category: Mystery
Language: English
Publisher: Mysterious Press; 1st edition (March 1, 1984)
Pages: 263 pages
ISBN: 0892960698
ISBN13: 978-0892960699
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 534
Other formats: txt lit rtf mobi


Open Road Integrated Media ebook.

Open Road Integrated Media ebook. In Memory of. KENNETH MILLAR. Richard II. Part One. First Tastes of Blood.

Home James Ellroy Blood on the Moon. He sat down on the curb and thought of the two wretched people in the photographs, and of Janice who wouldn’t blow him, but who did the final deed on their first date two weeks before high school graduation, leaving Lloyd Hopkins, Marshall High Class of ’59, aglow with wonder at the love in his future

Blood on the Moon (1984) is a crime novel by James Ellroy. It was followed by Because the Night (1984) and Suicide Hill (1985).

Blood on the Moon (1984) is a crime novel by James Ellroy. Although the novels are written in multiple perspectives and narrated omnisciently, the main character in all three is Lloyd Hopkins. The story begins in 1965 during the Watts Riots in Los Angeles, California. 23-year-old Lloyd Hopkins is still with the National Guard and is deployed to help handle the situation

Blood on the Moon is very much a psychological novel, as both Hopkins and the killer have very disturbed psyches dating back to youthful traumas. Ellroy’s unstated thesis is to contrast how they each turn out.

Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Blood on the Moon is very much a psychological novel, as both Hopkins and the killer have very disturbed psyches dating back to youthful traumas. For, although Hopkins doesn’t become a serial killer, he does become a serial philanderer, to the consternation of his wife, and his quirks become apparent as the book progresses.

Blood on the Moon is very much a psychological novel, as both Hopkins and the killer have very disturbed psyches . Unfortunately, Ellroy’s psychology is badly flawed, based on a rather odd understanding of homosexuality

Blood on the Moon is very much a psychological novel, as both Hopkins and the killer have very disturbed psyches dating back to youthful traumas. Unfortunately, Ellroy’s psychology is badly flawed, based on a rather odd understanding of homosexuality. The killer was assaulted as a teenager, which, according to Ellroy, has turned him gay, which, in turn, is the motivation for his killing the women.

Blood on the Moon book. Blood on the Moon is an early James Ellroy novel, and is similar to others in that it has moments of brilliance but never truly comes together into something great. Detective Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins can’t stand music, or any loud. Ellroy has a way with words unlike any other author I know, almost making poetry out of dark, disturbing themes. Here he focuses a lot on the villain, a depraved serial killer known as The Poet. The stories of his killings are darkly fascinating, even if his genesis as a killer is a bit generic and stereotypical.

When James Ellroy wrote his third novel, he was a long way from developing the unique skills that . Blood on the Moon The Lloyd Hopkins Trilogy (Том 1). Автор.

When James Ellroy wrote his third novel, he was a long way from developing the unique skills that makes his later fiction so compelling. Blood on the Moon" is interesting as the work of a fascinating. That novel and 1990’s . Confidential, both of which were adapted for the screen, cemented his notoriety as an author of. historical crime fiction.

About Blood on the Moon. Detective Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins can’t stand music, or any loud sounds. James Ellroy is an American original, a sophisticated primitive as smooth as the snick-snick! of a pump shotgun and as subtle as the inevitable blast. The San Diego Union-Tribune. He’s got a beautiful wife, but he can’t get enough of other women. Ellroy’s writing is powerful. his pacing relentless.

Third book of James Ellroy and first novel of the Lloyd Hopkins trilogy, BLOOD ON THE MOON has been published in 1984. Adopting for the first time in his career an omniscient point of view, James Ellroy describes two destinies meant to meet for a deadly encounter. Both men have suffered a traumatic sexual experience in their teen days.

Fine, flawless, pristine book in a Near Fine Jacket. See scans and description. New York: The Mysterious Press, 1984. First Edition. Signed and inscribed by Ellroy to a noted collector on the ffep. Octavo, 263 pp. Red cloth, gilt spine imprint, photo-pictorial jacket. Fine, pristine book in a Near Fine jacket with a small crimp at spine top, trace wear elsewhere. See scans. A nice inscription in a true first edition copy of Blood on the Moon, Ellroy's third novel (after Brown's Requiem and Requiem, Shamus- and Edgar nominated titles respectively): "To __ : L.A. Blood Blitz ! - JE". Detective Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins appears for the first time and matches wits - or tries to - with a criminal psycho who protects the innocent. By murdering them. Ships in a new, sturdy, protective box - not a bag. L200
Reviews (7)
Asher
Contrary to popular belief, great authors don't always start out great, but often take years, and several books, to perfect their craft. A good case in point is James Ellroy, one of the best mystery novelists around today. However, "Blood on the Moon," one of his earliest works, is still a work in progress. While it showcases some of Ellroy's narrative strengths and his odd moral outlook on life, it also has some flaws that detract, especially for modern-day audiences.

"Blood on the Moon" was written in 1984 and is reflective both of the nature of forensic police work at that pre-DNA, pre-computer, pre-Internet time and the social mores of the day. The book follows two main characters largely in alternating chapters. The first is a serial killer who remains unnamed for most of the book, instead being referred to as “the poet.” The killer preys on young, attractive woman, but is so careful in his planning and varying in his methods, that he avoids detection for nearly 15 years.

The book's protagonist is Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins, an unconventional but near genius detective who can solve cases based on the faintest of clues. Hopkins tumbles onto the killer when he finds a poem written in blood at the latest crime scene. When the poem hints that the killer has done this before, Hopkins painstakingly goes through unsolved cases and gradually pieces together over a dozen murders he attributes to the suspect. But, while Hopkins is gathering intelligence on the killer, the killer in turn is learning about Hopkins, thanks to bugging devices he has planted.

“Blood on the Moon” is very much a psychological novel, as both Hopkins and the killer have very disturbed psyches dating back to youthful traumas. Ellroy’s unstated thesis is to contrast how they each turn out. For, although Hopkins doesn’t become a serial killer, he does become a serial philanderer, to the consternation of his wife, and his quirks become apparent as the book progresses. The psychological aspect of the book is quite quite intriguing, at times as interesting as the book’s action.

Unfortunately, Ellroy’s psychology is badly flawed, based on a rather odd understanding of homosexuality. The killer was assaulted as a teenager, which, according to Ellroy, has turned him gay, which, in turn, is the motivation for his killing the women. Further, and more generally, according to Ellroy, all gays actually want to be women. In addition, “Blood on the Moon” is filled with other gay references, as nearly all the other crimes discussed in the book have some connection with gay bars, gay hustlers, or other aspects of the gay culture of the day, and derogatory slang words abound (the cops in the book use the N-word a good bit as well). It’s possible the younger Ellroy may have thought he was making the book more sophisticated by including gay references that other cop novels of the day simply ignored. Bur, at best, his emphasis on the gay subtext in the entire book is overkill and at worst patronizing and, at times quite offensive.

I realize that all books are products of the culture of the era in which they were written (no one today talks as they do in Shakespeare’s works), and that much of what we consider offensive today was perfectly normal in fictional works of earlier years. But these references did affect my enjoyment of the book, and doubtless, others’ enjoyment as well. In addition, they occupy far too much of the book, crowding out other, better plot threads. All told, this is not Ellroy at his best; instead, it’s an author who allows a sub-theme to dominate a book, to its overall detriment, no matter whether judged by 1983 or 2017 standards. As a result, I would give the book 3.5 stars, but for the strength of the overall writing and the nature of the mutual trackdown between hero and villain aspects of the book, I’m rounding it up to four stars. “Blood on the Moon” is definitely lesser Ellroy, and an author in progress, but he’d already progressed a good bit farther than a lot of others you’ll find.

Justie
Meet LAPD Sergeant Detective Lloyd Hopkins. He's a brilliant man, but childhood trauma has left him disliking loud noise and music. He loves his wife, but he also shares his love with plenty of other women throughout L.A. He tells his daughters bedtime stories, not about princesses and princes, but instead about crime scenes and police work. Since the Watts riots, he has dedicated himself to fighting evil. He stumbles upon a grizzly crime scene in an apartment and finds a connection to a series of deaths of young women that might all be connected somehow, dating back to almost two decades.

Meet the poet: (No, not from Micheal Connelly's book) He was a young man who suffered humiliation and trauma in high school. That trauma turned him into a serial killer who has killed for nearly 2 decades without the police ever noticing. That is until Sergeant Hopkins takes notice.

Basically the book is about two very traumatized men. One killer and one cop. That ying-yang, cat and mouse complex makes the story interesting. Although I did not find the protagonist a likable one. He's sympathetic, but he's so egotistical. Another thing about the book that I found off-putting is the blatant racism. Now, I'm not saying that racism isn't real, but it's as if every character is okay with using racial epithets even if they are not racist. The violence is a bit extreme, but that sort of stuff doesn't bother me. I've read Micheal Connelly, Dennis Lehane, Thomas Harris, and Stephen King. It's a interesting read.

Small Black
The protagonist, Detective Lloyd Hopkins is an incredibly damaged person pursuing an equally damaged serial killer. The tale is unusual, filled with intricate details, but it is not a novel I particularly liked or enjoyed reading. Ellroy's writing is, as always, superb, but the story was so filled with darkness and despair, I longed for one character...just one...who was not morally bankrupt or sexually deviant. Oddly, final confrontation left me disappointed. It was quick and anticlimactic. On the plus side, the characters are memorable and well-drawn.

Blackbeard
Who will enjoy this? If you really like James Ellroy, read this book. By "like" I mean the same feeling of devotion that makes a Faulkner fan read "Sanctuary" or "A Fable"---because the Master wrote it, and you really want to see where the Master came from and what he writes when he is not having his best day.

The parts inside the mind of the killer are great. The parts near the end where the action heats up are great. However, I really miss Ellroy's signature staccato/syncopated style which he perfected in White Jazz and then the American Tabloid Trilogy. Plus, the early narration is almost amateurish. He does waaay too much telling and not enough showing. The dialogue is not always realistic. And there are some word repetition problems that should make all writer grateful that we now write on word processors and not typewriters. If I was reading the book without having read the LA Confidential Quartet and the American Tabloid Trilogy, I would currently be debating whether or not to read the next entry in the series. Since I know that somewhere between this book and Black Dahlia, Ellroy works out his style problems and becomes a very good writer, I will probably read the next one.

Sat
I started this book based on a comment by Tom Hanks that he would like to portray Lloyd Hopkins. I was repulsed by the mindless brutality of the first two chapters and put it down. This is not for me.

Faulkree
A whole generation of mystery hacks have tried to copy him, but he paid the price to speak of life, death, and blood on the moon. Many don’t recognize true literature, true sight, but this is an agony of knowing, of praying, of receiving truth wrapped in wounded cop on the black streets of LA.

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