» » The Betrayal of Trust: A Simon Serailler Mystery (Simon Serailler Mysteries)
hotellemcasadeicervia.it
ePub 1740 kb. | Fb2 1185 kb. | DJVU: 1922 kb.
Thriller

The Betrayal of Trust: A Simon Serailler Mystery (Simon Serailler Mysteries) epub ebook

by Susan Hill

The Betrayal of Trust: A Simon Serailler Mystery (Simon Serailler Mysteries) epub ebook

Author: Susan Hill
Category: Mystery
Language: English
Publisher: The Overlook Press; Reprint edition (October 30, 2012)
Pages: 368 pages
ISBN: 1468300652
ISBN13: 978-1468300659
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 342
Other formats: txt azw rtf lrf


Susan Hill―the Man Booker Prize nominee whose ghost story The Woman in Black is now a major film starring Daniel Radcliffe―has written her most captivating work in The Betrayal of Trust

Susan Hill―the Man Booker Prize nominee whose ghost story The Woman in Black is now a major film starring Daniel Radcliffe―has written her most captivating work in The Betrayal of Trust. The English town of Lafferton is ravaged by flash floods. A shallow grave is exposed; the remains of missing teenager Harriet Lowther have been uncovered. Harriet was the daughter of a prominent local businessman.

The Betrayal of Trust book. In The Betrayal of Trust, she has written the most chilling. Every time I open the cover of one of Susan Hill's Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler mysteries I think, well, she's going to have figured this out by now. She's going to have realized that you can't keep passing your readership razor blades and encouraging the location of a vein.

The Betrayal of Trust, . part of Simon Serrailler Series. THE RAIN HAD been steady all afternoon as Simon Serrailler drove home from Wales and the wedding of an old friend. show page numbers ▼1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43. Page 1. One. Severe weather warning. Now, as he poured himself a whisky, it was lashing against the tall windows of his flat and the gale was roaring up between the houses of the Cathedral Close. He had spread out some of his recent drawings on the long table, to begin the careful business of selection for his next exhibition.

Susan Hill's readers met the enigmatic and brooding Simon Serrailler in The Various Haunts of Men and got to know him better in the four mysteries that followed. In The Betrayal of Trust, she has written the most chilling and unputdownable book yet. Freak weather and flash floods have hit southern England. The small cathedral town of Lafferton is underwater, and a landslip on the moor has closed the roads. As the rain slowly drains away, a shallow grave––and a skeleton––are exposed; twenty years on, the remains of missing teenager Joanne Lowther have finally been uncovered

Simon Serrailler The Betrayal of Trust. Amazing book read 10 times never got tired of it once?? Bianca. I love reading and hot guys just give me a good book and I’ll have a life Angela.

Simon Serrailler The Betrayal of Trust. Simon Serrailler A Question of Identity.

Электронная книга "The Betrayal of Trust: A Simon Serailler Mystery", Susan Hill

Электронная книга "The Betrayal of Trust: A Simon Serailler Mystery", Susan Hill. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Betrayal of Trust: A Simon Serailler Mystery" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Susan Hill’s new Simon Serrailler mystery, ‘The Betrayal of Trust’. The result has been her series about Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler, the top cop in the fictional cathedral town of Lafferton, not far from London

Susan Hill’s new Simon Serrailler mystery, ‘The Betrayal of Trust’. The result has been her series about Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler, the top cop in the fictional cathedral town of Lafferton, not far from London. The Betrayal of Trust is the sixth novel in the series, and it showcases the virtues, particularly characterization, that a literary writer can bring to the police procedural. It’s a sad novel, filled with illness, death and dying, but beautifully written. Some readers might be put off by its darkness, but it has the ring of truth on every page

Morale was at rock bottom, no one felt like trusting anyone and the Chief Constable had been threatening serious reprisals. None of it was Serrailler’s fault, but he still felt to blame.

Simon went through to the sitting room and looked out of the window, but even before he did so, took in the strangeness of the light on the white walls and ceiling, silver-pale and wavering in the reflection of the water below. It was like being transported to Venice. The Cathedral Close, as far as the gate at the end, was underwater, but the wind had died down now, so that there was a strange calm and stillness about the scene. Morale was at rock bottom, no one felt like trusting anyone and the Chief Constable had been threatening serious reprisals.

Susan Hill, CBE (born 5 February 1942) is an English author of fiction and non-fiction works. The Betrayal of Trust (2011). Women mystery writers. 20th-century British short story writers. Her novels include The Woman in Black, The Mist in the Mirror and I'm the King of the Castle for which she received the Somerset Maugham Award in 1971  . In 2004, Hill began a series of crime novels featuring detective Simon Serrailler, entitled The Various Haunts of Men (2004). A Question of Identity (2012). The Soul of Discretion (2014).

Title: The Betrayal of Trust. Susan Hill has been a professional writer for over fifty years. Her books have won awards and prizes including the Whitbread, the John Llewellyn Rhys and the Somerset Maugham; and have been shortlisted for the Booker

Title: The Betrayal of Trust. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Her books have won awards and prizes including the Whitbread, the John Llewellyn Rhys and the Somerset Maugham; and have been shortlisted for the Booker. She was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Honours.

Susan Hill―the Man Booker Prize nominee whose ghost story The Woman in Black is now a major film starring Daniel Radcliffe―has written her most captivating work in The Betrayal of Trust. The English town of Lafferton is ravaged by flash floods. A shallow grave is exposed; the remains of missing teenager Harriet Lowther have been uncovered. Harriet was the daughter of a prominent local businessman, and her death twenty years before had led to her mother’s suicide. Cold cases are always tough, and in this mystery in the enduringly popular series, Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler must confront his most grisly, dangerous, and complex case yet. Susan Hill’s understanding of the human heart, her brilliance when evoking characters, and her tremendous powers of storytelling come into full force in The Betrayal of Trust.
Reviews (7)
Umor
I have read all of Susan Hill's Simon Serailler mysteries and have enjoyed them, with the exception of this offering. Generally, Susan Hill has pitch-perfect characterizations, a good, evocative prose style, never shies away from dealing with difficult subject matters, and she carefully constructs her plots. Admittedly, some might find her mysteries rather dark as some of the plots deal not only with violent crimes but with characters struggling with terminal diseases. Others might find Hill's approach clinically realistic. Regardless, this approach can make for some uncomfortable reading; however, these subjects have hitherto fit into the main storyline in some perceptible, rational way. The novels revolve around the Serailler family -- a prominent and well-respected medical family in the fictional cathedral town of Lafferton. They do not simply focus on Simon, the detective, (the "black sheep" of the family, according to his father -- a stern and demanding physician). Of course, the mystery aspect of the novels center on the cases that Simon must solve in his role as Detective Chief Superintendant. He is a complex character who has deep, abiding issues with his father and finds it difficult to sustain a close romantic relationship. The interpersonal relationships in the Serailler family are intricate and fascinating and always make for a clever human backdrop against which the police procedural develops. In The Betrayal of Trust, however, this previously successful balancing act stumbles, in my opinion. There are various sub-plots and competing strands that deal with a host of terrible medical conditions, but they seem unrelated to the main mystery -- which revolves around the discovery of the remains of two young women. I am having a hard time finding the right words to describe how uncomfortable these subplots made me feel as a reader -- I couldn't understand why the author included such relentless passages, chronicling detailed physical suffering, or the intricate examination of one character who --understandably so -- feared a horrible (copious details included) impending death. This character seriously considered a Swiss suicide clinic and the reader is subjected to an emotional mine field as the character tries to persuade her own daughter to assist her in the medical suicide. What this whole episode has to do with the principle mystery is beyond me. I can easily envision many a reader being terribly upset by it. Very atypically for me, I found myself skipping whole passages and whole pages -- it simply became too distressing to read. That doesn't even touch on the struggles of another character who must deal with a loved one suffering from severe dementia, or the case of Simon's paramour, who is the primary caregiver of a much older husband suffering from advanced Parkinson's disease. It's excruciating reading. I am perplexed as to what Hill's purpose might be in including so many of these painful threads into her storyline. What is so strange to me is that, based on Hill's previous novels, when she made forays into this world of physical suffering, it at least made some sense to the story line and there was a resolution of some sort. That was not the case in The Betrayal of Trust. There was an abrupt ending which left hanging a hank of loose ends -- thus "rewarding" the reader who slogged through this mire of misery with only a sense of un-resolved emptiness. I would warn potential readers that this novel can be very upsetting for anyone who is dealing with a personal illness or is the primary caregiver to a loved one enduring a serious medical condition. Ironically, this book is aptly named, though perhaps not in the way the author intended. If you want to read some excellent Susan Hill novels, I would suggest the early ones in the Simon Serailler series -- though the trend in the last two or three books has been towards a darker, more brooding atmosphere, with more medical suffering, it is only in this last novel that the physical miseries over-take the rest of the storyline. I'm very sorry to award this only two stars, but I simply cannot recommend it.

Ishnllador
I have long enjoyed this series, which I have read in order. This time, however, the mystery seems almost incidental to the story. First, there is the story line about Simon falling in love. Very adolescent and their communications are frustratingly simpleminded. I dread the continuation of this.

The second storyline I have difficulty with is that of Jocelyn. After devoting a good portion of the book to revealing this woman's most intimate thoughts and inner conflicts (and their apparent resolution), we learn she has simply changed her mind about a couple of very important life decisions. And the manner in which we find out leaves me thinking the author had reached the end of her allotted pages and just checked off the box in order to tie that the thread up. And, as it happens, this storyline really offers next to nothing in terms of understanding the rest of the story, never mind the mystery itself.

I typically purchase the next story in the series as soon as I finish a book but I am holding off, at least for now. I cannot bear hearing any more about Rachel and Simon or their childish behavior with each other. But, mostly, I read this series for the mystery (and love the characters) so if the author is moving away from that and more toward advocacy on behalf of cultural policy I will stop here. While I do not take issue with her apparent positions, this is not the place I look to for information on such.

Gorisar
For the reader, the best thing about a series of books - if they're well-written - is the continual updating of the on-going characters' lives. Included as part of the plots, life events like birth, death, illness, marriage, and divorce, move the story forward and make the characters more three-dimensional. Susan Hill, the author of the British procedurals featuring DCI Simon Serailler, is a master of this updating and I always look forward to her next book in the series.

Her latest, "The Betrayal of Trust" is a worthy addition to the series. Set in the southwest of England, Simon Serailler is the only cop in a family of doctors. A loner by nature, he invests his energies in his job and in his avocation of sketching. He's gaining fame as an artist, but his true interests lie in his job. Crimes are not rare in his town of Lafferton, but the washing away of land in a horrendous storm uncovers two bodies. Both are young women, and one is soon identified as the body of a 15 year old girl who had gone missing some 16 years before. Serailler opens a "cold case" on the bodies and gets to work.

But Simon Serailler's family and friends also come into the picture. His sister, a doctor and a widow who's raising three children on her own, needs help. So does his step-mother, married to Simon's irascible father, who finds things out about her husband and his family that don't sit too well with her. And Simon - long aloof from the vagaries and messiness of love - finds himself struck by cupid's arrow. There are two other plot lines - seemingly at odds with the main one - that are fairly well tied up by Hill at book's end.

Are Hill's "Serailler" books police procedurals or are they family sagas? They're actually a combination of the two and are brilliantly done. I'm looking forward to the next one.

2016-2020 © www.hotellemcasadeicervia.it
All rights reserved