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Long Taters: A Baseball Biography of George "Boomer" Scott epub ebook

by Ron Anderson

Long Taters: A Baseball Biography of George "Boomer" Scott epub ebook

Author: Ron Anderson
Category: Biographies
Language: English
Publisher: McFarland; First Edition edition (November 25, 2011)
Pages: 308 pages
ISBN: 0786449764
ISBN13: 978-0786449767
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 366
Other formats: doc txt lrf rtf


A baseball biography of George Scott of Red Sox, Brewers, Royals, Yankees. Ron Kaplan, author of '501 Baseball Books Fans Must Read before They Die'.

A baseball biography of George Scott of Red Sox, Brewers, Royals, Yankees.

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When African American first baseman George "Boomer" Scott made. Author: Ron Anderson. May be you will be interested in other books by Ron Anderson: Long Taters: A Baseball Biography of George "Boomer" Scott by Ron Anderson. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Title: Long Taters: A Baseball Biography of George "Boomer" Scott. No user reports were added yet. Be the first! Send report: This is a good book.

Type: Print book : Biography. Publisher: Jefferson, . View most popular tags as: tag list. african american history (by 1 person). baseball (by 1 person). baseball history (by 1 person). biography (by 1 person). black baseball (by 1 person). boston red sox (by 1 person). calico joe (by 1 person). Flag as Inappropriate.

Family man who enjoys beautiful flowers, good food, red wine, g. .

Family man who enjoys beautiful flowers, good food, red wine, good books and baseball.

George Charles Scott, Jr. (March 23, 1944 – July 28, 2013) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox (1966–71, 1977–79), Milwaukee Brewers (1972–76), Kansas City Royals (1979) and New York Yankees (1979)

George Charles Scott, Jr. (March 23, 1944 – July 28, 2013) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox (1966–71, 1977–79), Milwaukee Brewers (1972–76), Kansas City Royals (1979) and New York Yankees (1979). His nickname was "Boomer". Scott batted and threw right-handed. Scott was born March 23, 1944, in Greenville, Mississippi, as the youngest of three children

Taxonomy upgrade extras: SABR Bookshelf book covers.

Taxonomy upgrade extras: SABR Bookshelf book covers. Cronkite School at ASU 555 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 Phone: (602) 496-1460. SABR is housed at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

Shop with confidence. Book of Revelation: By Scott Archibald Anderson Scott. Long Taters : A Baseball Biography of George Boomer Scott by Anderson, Ron. Free US Delivery ISBN: 0786449764. Fractured Lands by Scott Anderson (2016, Hardcover). Customs services and international tracking provided. Esther, The Hebrew-Persian Queen: By William Anderson Scott.

This detailed biography chronicles George "Boomer" Scott's youth in violently racist Mississippi, his impressive 14-year professional career, and the challenges he faced off the field. Based on hundreds of hours of interviews with the former slugger, this work celebrates the legend and reveals the barriers still existing for black ball players years after Jackie Robinson"-Provided by publisher. No current Talk conversations about this book.

When African American first baseman George Boomer Scott made his debut in the major leagues in 1966, he took the field for the Boston Red Sox-the last major league team to field a black ballplayer, only seven years before.

When African American first baseman George "Boomer" Scott made his debut in the major leagues in 1966, he took the field for the Boston Red Sox--the last major league team to field a black ballplayer, only seven years before. An eight-time Gold Glove Award winner, a three-time All-Star, and an important member of the Red Sox 1967 Impossible Dream American League Champions, Scott stroked 271 "taters"--a term he coined for home runs that has been memorialized in baseball lexicon. Yet throughout his career, the outspoken player faced an ongoing struggle to gain racial acceptance. This detailed biography chronicles Scott's youth in violently racist Mississippi, his impressive 14-year professional career, and the challenges he faced off the field. Based on hundreds of hours of interviews with the former slugger, this work celebrates one of Boston's legends and reveals the barriers that still existed for black ball players years after Jackie Robinson paved the way.
Reviews (6)
Blackstalker
I enjoyed the book...however, I wish more space had been given to when Boomer was in Milwaukee for five years...that's when I remember him best from (and was angered when he was traded back to Boston with Bernie Carbo for Cecil Cooper)...still, it was a very good book.

Kann
Boomer was my idol with the Red Sox while I was in high school playing baseball in Massachusetts. His picture was always on my bedroom closet door. And now after 47 years I have this man again in my thoughts. “Thank you George for coming out with the book.” I am enjoying the read and enlightened by the things I didn't realize or know about my idol.

Anicasalar
I highly recommend this book, very good and the price cant be beat.

Inertedub
The baseball biography genre doesn't lend itself to great literature. There was an
emphasis on Scott's difficulties in an era of transition for race relations, and a
warranted emphasis on the Red Sox's poor track record in that regard. Some
things which I thought might be in it were missing: Scott's off-season work on his
game in the company of Billy Williams and others; more than a cursory mention of
his private life--some anecdotes about The Boomer's physical presence and the
times he intervened to break up confrontations. At the very end of the book it seems
to suggest that Scott knew if he'd been more willing to adapt he might have had more
success--that comes as an abrupt shift in tone. Generally speaking the gifted athlete
and soft-handed glove man are properly credited. George's popularity with the fans
might have been developed, and something about his relationships with his teammates
might have been interesting. Still, having read a number of baseball books, they do
tend to be written much the same as this one has been, and any fan of The Boomer
will be interested--and sometimes saddened-- to relive his career.

Kare
Author Ron Anderson did his research on this book, not only spending hours reading microfilm but also traveling all the way to George Scott's hometown in Greenville, Mississippi and interviewing neighbors and newspaper folks there. Scott came from a a truly impoverished background. He literally picked cotton in the fields, and he started fielding using a paper sack as a glove - later winning eight Gold Glove Awards, as one of the best-fielding first basemen of all time.

Not only did he have to make his way up and out from under poverty, but he had to try to overcome racism as well. It was never an easy struggle - but he made it, and spent 14 years in the major leagues.

Anderson's book doesn't just skim the surface. He digs for details. It's a dense book, and well-written. The amount of detail is impressive, informed by more than 50 interviews, and is especially strong in areas many authors skip through - the minor-league years, the years of trying to make the grade.

And he devotes time to "The Boomer's" years playing Mexican League baseball, too.

Anderson worked closely with Scott, interviewing him on numerous occasions over the more than four years he devoted to working on Scott's biography. But he also chased down some of those with whom Scott clashed, such as Sox manager Dick Williams. A more complete understanding of some of the issues that followed Scott through his career results, and some insight.

A very welcome book.

Rainbearer
I finished reading Ron Anderson's "Long Taters" not long ago and I was very impressed with it. Anderson does an excellent job bringing to life the struggles George Scott overcame in his youth while growing up in a poor and racially-divided area of the Deep South, and again with the Boston Red Sox, the last team to integrate after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947. That Anderson and Scott are friends gives the reader an up-close look at "Boomer," who provides a first-hand account of his life and baseball career, and provides several opinions that some might not agree with. Still, I commend Anderson and Scott for telling it as they see it and I highly recommend this book even to the most casual of fan.

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