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Self-Help

Born Liars: Why We Can't Live Without Deceit epub ebook

by Ian Leslie

Born Liars: Why We Can't Live Without Deceit epub ebook

Author: Ian Leslie
Category: Relationships
Language: English
Publisher: Quercus Books (May 1, 2011)
Pages: 390 pages
ISBN: 184916424X
ISBN13: 978-1849164245
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 693
Other formats: mobi lrf txt rtf


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Born Liars by Ian Leslie has helped understand that lying is a normal human behavior. In short Born Liars is a great read. Surprisingly I didn't understand it. I still don't like to be lied to but realize now that if someone tells the true they are extraordinary. Leslie errs away from his own opinion and reasoning (and I would have liked to hear his thesis), and relies heavily on other's academic material, making this book a strong technical piece, but perhaps lacking a personal touch or point. Nonetheless recommended.

In Born Liars Ian Leslie dissects deceit through the lens of law, psychology and culture. The only flaw being a lack of depth and details. In short Born Liars is a great read

In Born Liars Ian Leslie dissects deceit through the lens of law, psychology and culture. It's a fascinating ride, but I wouldn't recommend the central section which covers self-deception for anyone feeling squeamish about their own illusions.

Ian Leslie takes us on a fascinating journey that makes us question not only our own relationship to the truth, but also virtually every daily . Born Liars is thought-provoking, anecdotally driven narrative nonfiction at its best.

Ian Leslie takes us on a fascinating journey that makes us question not only our own relationship to the truth, but also virtually every daily encounter we have.

Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. He combines careers in advertising and writing. Born Liars, however, is in quite a different league. It's erudite yet wears its learning lightly and is full of terrific stories

Ian Leslie was born in 1972 and lives in London. It's erudite yet wears its learning lightly and is full of terrific stories. It will also make you see yourself, and the world around you, in a new light. 'Book of the Week', Daily Mail.

In Born Liars, Ian Leslie argues that, far from being a bug in the human software, lying is central to who we are; that we cannot understand ourselves without first understanding the dynamics of deceit. Our attitudes to lying are confused and contradictory - you might even say, self-deceiving. On the one hand we hate lies, and liars. On the other, we all indulge in fibs, tall tales and fantasies. If lying is wrong, why do we all do it - both to others, and to ourselves?

Ian Leslie contends that lying is not a perversion of our nature, it’s central to it. It is neither a design flaw nor a glitch, but necessary to our mental stability and social behaviour

Ian Leslie contends that lying is not a perversion of our nature, it’s central to it. It is neither a design flaw nor a glitch, but necessary to our mental stability and social behaviour. You are currently logged out.

Library and archives canada cataloguing in publication. Leslie, Ian. Born liars, Ian Leslie. eISBN 978-1-77089-028-2. 1. Truthfulness and falsehood.

Ian Leslie’s contention in this consistently startling and fascinating book is that lying, far from being bad for us, is an essential part of. .

Ian Leslie’s contention in this consistently startling and fascinating book is that lying, far from being bad for us, is an essential part of who we are. Lying, he believes, drives evolution: the cleverest tactician is more likely to survive than his or her more doltish companions. It also gives us a sharper, alluring reproductive edge and even makes us more balanced people. Deceit: From thermal-imaging cameras designed to read guilty eyes to brain-wave scanners, the world is becoming a trickier place for people who tell lies

Our attitudes to lying are confused and contradictory - you might even say, self-deceiving. On the one hand we hate lies, and liars. On the other, we all indulge in fibs, tall tales and fantasies. If lying is wrong, why do we all do it - both to others, and to ourselves? In Born Liars, Ian Leslie argues that, far from being a bug in the human software, lying is central to who we are; that we cannot understand ourselves without first understanding the dynamics of deceit. Using a vivid, panoramic style, he explores the role of deception and self-deception in our childhoods, our careers, and our health, and the part played by lies - both black and white - in art, advertising, sport, politics and war. Drawing on thinkers as varied as Augustine, Charles Darwin, Sigmund Freud, Ian McEwan and Marlon Brando, he takes the reader on an exhilarating tour of ideas that brings the latest news about deception back from the frontiers of evolutionary psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy. Born Liars is crammed with colourful stories; we'll meet Benjamin Franklin in Paris as he takes on Franz Mesmer, the man who claimed to heal his patients by touching them with iron rods. We'll hear about a spy who beat a lie detector, a man accused of cheating his way to a million pounds on a TV game show, and we'll peer inside the minds of Bill Clinton and Saddam Hussein. Born Liars takes us on a fascinating journey which makes us question not only our own relationship to the truth, but also virtually every daily encounter we have.
Reviews (7)
Drelalen
‘The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool,’ said the physicist Richard Feynman.

LØV€ YØỮ
gave me insights for my work as a coach

Zainian
Very Interesting

LoboThommy
Very good intro to the psychology and sociology of lying. Lots of detailed descriptions from famous research. Helps bring perspectives to everyday life.

Lailace
An interesting book on an interesting subject ! The book covers a verity of different fields that are connected with the main subject. There reading itself is both interesting and fluent.

Redfury
Born Liars by Ian Leslie has helped understand that lying is a normal human behavior. Surprisingly I didn't understand it. I still don't like to be lied to but realize now that if someone tells the true they are extraordinary.

Dyni
In Born Liars Ian Leslie dissects deceit through the lens of law, psychology and culture. It's a fascinating ride, but I wouldn't recommend the central section which covers self-deception for anyone feeling squeamish about their own illusions. Leslie unpacks many of the cognitive biases we have towards viewing ourselves positively and reading this book may just remove those illusions.

The first few chapters are recommended to all however, especially anyone enamoured with the idea of lie-detecting, whether with machine or person (spoiler its really hard to detect lies)

The last section on the culture of lying is eye-opening to say the least. The only flaw being a lack of depth and details.

In short Born Liars is a great read. Leslie errs away from his own opinion and reasoning (and I would have liked to hear his thesis), and relies heavily on other's academic material, making this book a strong technical piece, but perhaps lacking a personal touch or point.

Nonetheless recommended.

Lie is universally condemned. Since childhood, we were taught not to lie. However, the fact remains the same: people lie. Quite often, they lie without even realizing what they are doing. People are lying to others, but, mostly, to themselves.

I would not recommend this book as a moral guidance or a practical to-do manual for those who want to stop lying. However, it is deep and insightful in its approach. The author makes a point that lie is a part of our nature. Humans learned to lie at earliest stages of their development, and it is quite possible that lie helped us to evolve and to become as smart as we are now.

There is no wonder that lie is closely related to creative imagination. As a rule, liars are better adapted socially, since they can 'read' thoughts and feelings of others. On the other hand, some of mentally handicapped people don't lie and can't recognize when they're lied to.

One of the worst forms of deception is a self-deception, so the book tells of what we habitually do to distort our perception of reality.

Having said all that, the author still believes (like every rational person does) that lying is wrong. But we need to be aware of the context in which lying occurs, along with underlying psychological mechanisms of lying. Only then we'll be able to successfully (more or less) live up to a moral code that requires truthfulness.

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