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Self-Help

Blink: The Power Of Thinking Without Thinking epub ebook

by Malcolm Gladwell

Blink: The Power Of Thinking Without Thinking epub ebook

Author: Malcolm Gladwell
Category: Memory Improvement
Language: English
Publisher: Allen Lane (2005)
ISBN: 071399844X
ISBN13: 978-0713998443
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 119
Other formats: lrf txt azw lrf


It considers both the strengths of the adaptive unconscious, for example in expert judgment, and its pitfalls, such as stereotypes.

has been added to your Cart. He is also the co-founder of Pushkin Industries, an audio content company that produces the podcasts Revisionist History, which reconsiders things both overlooked and misunderstood, and Broken Record, where he, Rick Rubin, and Bruce Headlam interview musicians across a wide range of genres. Gladwell has been included in the Time 100 Most Influential People list and touted as one of Foreign Policy's Top Global Thinkers.

Later, thinking back on that moment, Hoving realized why that thought had popped into his mind: I had dug in. .The third and most important task of this book is to convince you that our snap judgments and first impressions can be educated and controlled. I know that’s hard to believe.

Later, thinking back on that moment, Hoving realized why that thought had popped into his mind: I had dug in Sicily, where we found bits and pieces of these things. They just don’t come out looking like that. The kouros looked like it had been dipped in the very best café latte from Starbucks. Harrison and Hoving and the other art experts who looked at the Getty kouros had powerful and sophisticated reactions to the statue, but didn’t they bubble up unbidden from their unconscious?

Contents iii Unit 1 Thinking and reasoning . Thinking as a skill 1 . An introduction Thinking .I think that would change the way wars are fought, the kinds of products we see

Contents iii Unit 1 Thinking and reasoning .Positive Thinking: 50 Positive Habits to Transform you Life: Positive Thinking, Positive Thinking Techniques, Positive Energy, Positive Thinking,, Positive. Positive Thinking Techniques Book 1). 67 Pages·2016·423 KB·6,989 Downloads·New! we wish to achieve, needs to be driven by the power of positivity. I think that would change the way wars are fought, the kinds of products we see The Power of Positive Thinking. 16 MB·89,989 Downloads. thinking, and I want to ask how I can get some faith in myself.

The Statue That Didn’t Look Right In September of 1983, an art dealer by the name of Gianfranco Becchina approached the J. Paul Getty Museum in California. The Statue That Didn’t Look Right. In September of 1983, an art dealer by the name of Gianfranco Becchina approached the J. He had in his possession, he said, a marble statue dating from the sixth century BC.

Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error?

He grew up in Canada and graduated with a degree in history from the University of Toronto in 1984.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -262) and index

Includes bibliographical references (p. -262) and index.

Malcolm Gladwell introduces us to a thinking technique he calls "thin slicing", which allows us to make decisions very quickly. As he describes it, thin slicing is the ability or method of paying attention to just a few, key factors, versus weighting multiple variables when making a decision

Malcolm Gladwell introduces us to a thinking technique he calls "thin slicing", which allows us to make decisions very quickly. As he describes it, thin slicing is the ability or method of paying attention to just a few, key factors, versus weighting multiple variables when making a decision. This is not a how-to book but rather a collection of stories and examples Gladwell has organized that demonstrate thin slicing and it's bets and worst. The stories and examples are fun to read and thought provoking. I found myself analyzing my thinking while reading several of the stories.

In his landmark bestseller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink, he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within.
Reviews (7)
Malhala
This is an incredible tour de force with detailed research and eye-opening, and often disheartening insights into our flawed personal decision making processes. If read rightly, I believe this will thrust you into a new way of thinking and cause you to strive to develop ways to overcome unintentional biases and even hope to improve when you "trust your gut." Read wrongly, it will either cause frustration and hopelessness or anger and resentment. Gladwell does not give a prescription here. He doesn't provide a blueprint or a roadmap. He educates and leaves it to us to see where in our day to day we might be mind blind or are relying too heavily on data rather than instinct (or vice versa). It is truly up to us to take this information and use it as a lens to examine our own thinking and search to improve how we take what we see and use it to make better choices.

Kinashand
This book touches on a brilliant idea: we make decisions rapidly, even if we can't always explain exactly HOW we make those decisions. Gladwell does an excellent job at providing evidence to back up his claims. Really... he provides a plethora of examples to support these claims. In my opinion, WAY too many examples.

I'm a bottom-line kind of person and I don't read for fun; I read to gain applicable knowledge. Gladwell proved his concept in the first 30-50 pages and that was good enough for me. He then proceeded to continue proving the concept for another 200 pages. I hardly learned how to actually apply the concepts of rapid-cognition from this book and I'm annoyed at how much of my time was wasted. I wish he proved the concept in 30-50 pages and followed it up with actual ways to take advantage of that concept.

This book verified something that I believed to be true (rapid-cognition) without providing ways to practically exploit the theory. I'm not buying anything else of Gladwell's, but I would recommend looking up the sparknotes/summary of this book.

Fenritaur
This is a read for an Ethics and the Media class. Mind-blowing! Truly a fantastic read and I feel like I learned a lot about how different types of thinking give us better results in different scenarios. The stories within are fascinating and the entire class raved about our favoritess and how incredible the processes worked. Really makes you look at the world differently, and it a good way. A classmate had read another Gladwell title - I am excited to find that this author has more to read - I will definitely be checking out his other titles! I have loaned my copy to several friends who have all been just as impressed. Fantastic read for sure!

Kerry
A terrible collection of cherry picked anecdotes and conflicting data, all carefully laid out to appeal to the instant gratification of the human ego.

Gladwell had made a chunk of change telling us we can "blink" and know the truest of truths... that our guts are inherently correct (well, except the many times he points out how incorrect they are, due to racism (except when he back pedals and says maybe the people in that example aren't racist, actually), sexism (except when he says it's possible sexism was not, in fact, a factor in such and such examples), and other biases (which the book both promises to teach us to control and says we have *no ability* to control), and that by "thin-slicing" (making use of the "adaptive unconscious" of our mind, which, incidentally, he says repeatedly can never be unlocked) we can be better people, fight wars "better", and solve the problems of the world.

It's a book for the casual reader, so the stories he uses to back up his arguments are often terribly irresponsible anecdotes. The studies he references are rarely detailed sufficiently so that the reader could know whether they'd had any controls, had been repeated and peer reviewed, etc. They're riddled with opinion and assumptions about results, and we're left to assume the lens from which he makes these statements is pure and holy.

The best take away from this self help quickie is that some people will, as a result of spending a dozen or so hours reading it and thinking about their minds and how they work, will be, going forward, more introspective, which is not a bad thing. The worst take away is that some (and I fear most) people will glean only the basest concept from his promises: that their guts are always right, leaving them less introspective and more irrationally bold and self-satisfied.

Browelali
“When making a decision of minor importance, I have always found it advantageous to consider all the pros and cons. In vital matters, however, such as the choice of a mate or a profession, the decision should come from the unconscious, from somewhere within ourselves. In the important decisions of personal life, we should be governed, I think, by the deep inner needs of our nature.” –Sigmund Freud

What’s better: long, thought out decisions or quick, snap judgments? We have always been told not to judge a book by its cover, but at times our unconscious conclusions are more accurate. Malcolm Gladwell carefully investigates the power (both good and bad) of quick thinking. This is an extremely interesting book that will challenge the way you think – and don’t think.

What can I say about Malcolm Gladwell that I haven’t said before? He takes the simplest topics, he digs down deep to find amazing complexity, simplifies the finding, all while entertaining us. From the moment I picked up this book, I didn’t want to put it down.

lifestyle
I guess what immediately caused me to doubt the author's thesis (the first two seconds) is his introductory story of the Getty Kouros. He assumes Zeri, Harrison, Hoving, and Dontas were correct in their "intuitive" conclusion. But the fact is, the piece is still on display at the Getty and there are good people on both sides. The Getty concludes it is one or the other, ancient or a modern forgery. No one really knows. So the two second intuition in his first example has not been proven to be accurate. I guess he should have used a better illustration to make his point. Nevertheless, he told the story well and I am compelled to read the rest of the book because of it, which is why I have rated it a 3.

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