ePub 1792 kb. | Fb2 1112 kb. | DJVU: 1690 kb.
Science, Fantasy

The silent voice: A novel epub ebook

by Christopher Hodder-Williams

The silent voice: A novel epub ebook

Author: Christopher Hodder-Williams
Language: English
Publisher: Weidenfeld and Nicolson; First Edition edition (1977)
Pages: 240 pages
ISBN: 0297773828
ISBN13: 978-0297773825
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 220
Other formats: lrf lrf lrf mobi


Silent Voice, Silent Voices or variants may refer to: The Silent Voices, 1892 poetry collection by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, see 1892 in poetry. The Silent Voice, 1977 novel by Christopher Hodder-Williams.

Silent Voice, Silent Voices or variants may refer to: The Silent Voices, 1892 poetry collection by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, see 1892 in poetry. A Silent Voice (manga) (Koe no Katachi), a Japanese manga. Silent Voices novel by Ann Cleeves. The Silent Voice (play), a 1914 stageplay. The Silent Voice (film), a 1915 silent melodrama film. The Man Who Played God, a 1932 film also called "The Silent Voice".

The Silent Voice book. Hodder-Williams mixes it all in an action-filled, cognitive thriller that asks the ultimate sci fi question: what happens when the computers take over?.

John Christopher Glazebrook Hodder-Williams (25 August 1926-15 May 1995) was an English writer, mainly of science fiction. But he also wrote novels about aviation and espionage. He was the son of Ralph Hodder-Williams, who was one of the owners of th eBritish publishing firm 'Hodder and Stoughton. Many of his books are early examples of what would later be called techno-thrillers. He also wrote teleplays and worked as a composer and lyricist.

Christopher Hodder-Williams probably did his best work in the late 1960s. The Silent Voice was first published in 1977. It deals with one of Hodder-Williams’ frequent themes, the risk that people will become subservient to technology. To modern readers, the novel’s view of computer technology might come across as dated. That doesn’t affect the story much, since the plot could just as easily fit into current times.

Christopher Hodder-Williams. Published by Littlehampton Book Services Ltd (1977). Your purchase will fund the shipping of free books to build school libraries for children overseas and plant trees with schools in the . Book-Cycle is a registered charity run entirely by volunteers. ISBN 10: 0297773828 ISBN 13: 9780297773825. From tree to book and back again. Seller Inventory ABE-1550251026105. More information about this seller Contact this seller 2. Stock Image. Hodder-Williams, Christopher. Published by Weidenfeld and Nicolson (1977).

First published in 1984 by Mithras Publishing.

The Silent Voice, 1977 novel by Christopher Hodder-Williams. Silent Voice", a song by Shaman's Harvest song from the album Smokin' Hearts & Broken Guns 2014. Silent Voices (Dionne Warwick song) 1967. Film, stage, television. The Silent Voice (The Lone Ranger episode), a 1951 TV episode of The Lone Ranger, see List of The Lone Ranger episodes. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

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Reviews (6)
Dog_Uoll
This was a very interesting concept of what could happen if computers tried to take over.
Completely different than any other book I've read!

Dianazius
Sorry but here is a other author with no clue about any of the "science" in his sci-fi. More than that, endless repetition describing the characters was BORING.

Contancia
Christopher Hodder-Williams probably did his best work in the late 1960s. The Silent Voice was first published in 1977. It deals with one of Hodder-Williams’ frequent themes, the risk that people will become subservient to technology.

To modern readers, the novel’s view of computer technology might come across as dated. That doesn’t affect the story much, since the plot could just as easily fit into current times. In fact, the ongoing development of Artificial Intelligence might make the threat posed in Silent Voice even more relevant to the present day.

The crew of a manned space flight cannot raise Mission Control as it returns to Earth. The computer that takes control of reentry changes the capsule’s splashdown location and refuses to return control to the astronauts. When the crew members finally make their way to a city in England, they find the population to be sharing the delusion that they are at war with an enemy they can’t quite identify. They believe they are living under martial law. They believe their walking sticks to be rifles. Air raid sirens wail but no planes ever appear. Strange days indeed.

The novel’s primary narrator is Barnes, an astronaut who is also a psychologist. He’s pretty sure that computers are responsible for whatever happened on Earth during their absence, but how and why have they instilled a mass delusion? And why would computers want to inflict totalitarianism on the world? (Well, why would anyone, but aren’t computers supposed to be more rational than people?) Eventually Barnes meets a woman -- perhaps the only person left on Earth who isn’t delusional -- who helps him arrive at an answer.

The story goes off track, I think, when it begins to focus on a crew member who has become schizophrenic. Or rather, his schizophrenic tendencies have become more pronounced, making it odd that he was deemed qualified to be an astronaut. In any event, Barnes’ interaction with his nutjob colleague drives much of the novel’s second half, and it is disappointingly dull.

The story does generate some interest, however, as different astronauts begin to contribute to a recorded diary. Each has suspicions about the others, at least in the sense of suspecting that the others aren’t competent -- they are insufficiently ruthless, or too ruthless, depending on a character’s point of view. Is Barnes paranoid? Is the commander spineless?

Although I liked the premise of The Silent Voice more than the execution, the novel does have some lively moments, and the ending is strong. The story loses its way in the middle, and for that reason I cannot give it a wholehearted recommendation. If I could, I would give The Silent Voice 3 1/2 stars.

Folsa
It’s important to realize that The Silent Voice is a reissue of a book written in 1977. As such, it’s not the wham bam thank you ma’am action of modern sf. It also features things like tape recorders and cassettes which seem like an anomaly for a modern day reader.

This isn’t a bad thing.

While this is nostalgic science fiction, it doesn’t simply trade on that nostalgia. The character building is stellar and the story is as much about the psychological impact of the Singularity as it is about the physical impact.

This is a thinking person’s apocalypse.

Eventually, while we still are privy to the psychological aspect of things, it also becomes a knife-edge adventure tale as we wonder about the survival of humanity itself.

An important reissue for the world of SF and well worth the little bit of extra effort it may take the reader at first.

• Advanced Reader Copy provided by Net Galley

Bloodray
In Christopher Hodder-Williams' science fiction novel, THE SILENT VOICE, four astronauts return from a lengthy Mars mission to find their world is not as they remember it.

Except for these four men, every human they encounter is under the delusion that nuclear war has decimated the planet, killing and displacing millions and laying waste to cities, land, and the infrastructure of civilization. Their own senses tell the astronauts that nothing has been destroyed, there are no casualties, and -- most disturbing of all -- no one is in charge.

In this constantly surprising, and always intriguing, novel, the handful of "normal" humans remaining must overcome their differences and weaknesses to determine the cause of the mass deception and somehow restore the world as they knew it. Their mission will keep readers guessing through instances of humor, fear, romance, suspicion, adventure, and courage against all odds.

This story was first published in 1977, so readers who bear that in mind will be impressed with the author's prescience. The early date also explains the story's reference to cassette tape recordings and pay phones, inasmuch as digital recording and cellular phones were decades in the future.
The story is told through the recorded diary entries of the mission psychologist, lending depth of personality and greater intimacy between narrator and reader.

Fans of "2001: A Space Odyssey" and "The Terminator" will feel right at home with this story. The author writes convincingly of NASA procedures, which deepens the reader's "it-could-happen" sentiments.

This book does not contain offensive or prurient material and is suitable for readers of any age.
A complimentary download was furnished to the reviewer via NetGalley.com in exchange for an objective review.

Buzatus
I was very pleased to read this thrilling, never slowing, action novel. I enjoyed the suspense, and the teasing thread that ran through the book. As I remember the book, it is as if I had seen the movie. I will be reading more by this author. It was at times quite vivid in its description of things, but due to the nature of the events it did not seem to be overwhelming. This is a book I will read again, so I'm glad it is in my collection.

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