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Science, Fantasy

The Cassini Division (Fall Revolution) epub ebook

by Ken MacLeod

The Cassini Division (Fall Revolution) epub ebook

Author: Ken MacLeod
Category: Science Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Tor Science Fiction; 1st edition (August 15, 2000)
ISBN: 0812568583
ISBN13: 978-0812568585
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 278
Other formats: lrf docx mbr rtf


Book 3 of 6 in the Fall Revolutions Series.

Book 3 of 6 in the Fall Revolutions Series. The Cassini Division is a group within the leaderless organization that defends humanity from various threats, such as the "fast folk", post-humans who occupy Jupiter and are the reason that computers aren't used for radio communication: the fast folk take over all radio and then the computers. They learn and grow exponentially fast and are very, very dangerous. The Cassini Division has weapons poised all over Jupiter to keep them there.

The Cassini Division book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Cassini Division (The Fall Revolution, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

SALON'Engaged, ingenious, and wittily partisan, Ken MacLeod is a one-man revolution, SF's Billy Bragg

SALON'Engaged, ingenious, and wittily partisan, Ken MacLeod is a one-man revolution, SF's Billy Bragg. Asimov's SFEllen May Ngwethu is a young woman with centuries of experience, no morality and the true knowledge.

com With his third novel, Ken MacLeod elaborates on the future timeline from his first two works, The Star Fraction (1995) and The Stone Canal (1996). Most relevant is book two, which established a colony on the remote world of New Mars via a spatial wormhole created by superhumans- transcendent machine-hosted intelligences called the "fast-folk. From Library Journal As an agent of the elite Cassini Division, Ellen May Ngewthu conceives of a bold plan to stop the incursions of godlike posthumans, whose arrogance nearly destroyed humankind and whose existence still threatens the safety of the Solar Union.

Fall Revolution Series is a tetralogy of science fiction novels by Ken Mcleod and include The Star Fraction, The Stone Canal, The Cassini Division and The Sky Road. The Cassini Division is set in a twenty-fourth century socialist society in which mankind has populated the solar system. It's great that this has been added here, but I wouldn't advise anyone to read this book without reading the first two parts of the series (I couldn't find them in the library) as they are connected. These are: 1. The Star Fraction 2. The Stone Canal 3. The Cassini Division 4. The Sky Road. Then again, if they are already on here and I've just not looked properly, please ignore my interruption.

Ken MacLeod brings dramatic life to some of the core issues of technology and humanity

Ken MacLeod brings dramatic life to some of the core issues of technology and humanity. товар 1 The Cassini Division by MacLeod, Ken Book The Fast Free Shipping -The Cassini Division by MacLeod, Ken Book The Fast Free Shipping. 424,01 RUB. Бесплатная доставка. товар 2 Fall Revolution: The Cassini Division 3 by Ken MacLeod (2000, Paperback, Revised -Fall Revolution: The Cassini Division 3 by Ken MacLeod (2000, Paperback, Revised. 245,38 RUB. + 2 331,42 RUB за доставку.

With his third novel, Ken MacLeod elaborates on the future timeline from his first two works, The Star Fraction (1995) and The Stone Canal (1996).

com User, October 7, 1999. All the comparisons are accurate. The Cassini Division" has a little bit of everything - fast action, snappy dialogue, evocative descriptions, speculation on the nature of consciousness, and enough trippy political-economic speculation to entertain (or annoy) Vernor Vinge and Iain Banks fans.

Ellen May Ngewthu is a soldier and leader of the Cassini Division, the elite defense force of the utopian Solar Union. Here in the twenty-fourth century, the forts of the Division, in orbit around Jupiter, are the front line in humanity's long standoff with the unknowable post-humans godlike beings descended from the men and women who transformed themselves with high technology centuries ago.The post-humans' capacities are unknown . . . but we know they disintegrated Ganymede, we know they punched a wormhole into Jovian space, and we know that the very surface of the solar system's largest planet has been altered by them. Worse, we know that they have been bombarding the inner solar system with powerful data viruses for generations.Now Ellen has a plan to rid humanity of this threat once and for all. But she needs to convince others to mistrust the post-humans as much as she does. In the process, much will be revealed--about history, about power, and about what it is to be human.
Reviews (7)
melody of you
I await the appearance of new books by favorite authors with barely-bated excitement, so I was thrilled when this latest offering showed up from Ken MacLeod, who is genuinely a favorite. The Cassini Division does not disappoint, with MacLeod's signature mix of hard science, political speculation, and sheer action. Unfortunately, I can read a novel in much less time than it takes to write one, and so the wait for the next installment in this promised series is likely to seem as long as a trip to a distant star.

Granijurus
Macleod's 3rd (or 4th?) foray into a far future world, where the societal institutions as you know them are gone. Capitalism is at an end, the world is liberated from economic inequity and pulluting machinery. Power is distributed mostly equaally as well... the exception being the massively powerful battlefleet under the monicker The Cassini Division; the story of one of its members is told here, with all her misgivings about the story's antagonists.

Agantrius
Everything according to the description!! I will buy more from this company for sure! No doubt about that! Thanks for your service!

Riavay
The Cassini Division is a very cool and possibility-opening look at a universe in which socialism wins the day in a positive way. People do work that they like because it needs doing and they are there, and why not? Nobody is doing without much of anything needful and people seem fairly content with it. There are dissenters, but for the most part they are harmless cranks, for all that they seem to love guns (why is it that in all right-wing people are pictured as loving guns, even when the author is one of them?).

The Cassini Division is a group within the leaderless organization that defends humanity from various threats, such as the "fast folk", post-humans who occupy Jupiter and are the reason that computers aren't used for radio communication: the fast folk take over all radio and then the computers. They learn and grow exponentially fast and are very, very dangerous.

The Cassini Division has weapons poised all over Jupiter to keep them there. Naturally, this book is about something that may upset that little balance, and the socialist order, too.

I enjoyed the story-telling pace, the characters weren't just cut-outs (especially the evil capitalist--you knew there would be at least one, didn't you?) and the fast folk were frightening. Also, SPACE OPERA! never a bad thing.

Fhois
Post-humans. Uploaded human minds inhabiting the robots and computer networks of a civilization in the atmosphere of Jupiter. Sneering at those still living in the "meat", they bombard the inner solar system with computer and "mind viruses." They brought on the Collapse, the destruction of man's computer-dependent civilization, and ushered in the age of the Solar Union, a socialist anarchy.
But some in the Union have had enough of the post-human threat, namely the Cassini Division, self-appointed cold warriors manning their version of the Berlin Wall on Jupiter's moon, Callisto. They want to wipe out the Jovians once and for all with a cometary bombardment. And they aren't listening to any arguments from "appeasers" or those who think the Jovians are sentient and deserve to live or don't pose a threat.
Ambiguity, irony, and philosophical debate make up a lot of this book, but it's not a dry tome unlike the many utopian and dystopian novels that supply several of Macleod's chapter headings. Macleod keeps the arguments short, the action coming, and shifts the scenery frequently from a pastoral London inhabited by the few die-hard capitalists to Callisto and, eventually, New Mars, man's sole outpost beyond our solar system.
The narrator, Ellen May Ngewthu, is engaging, fun, witty, and hard-edged. She's given herself the job of wiping out the Jovian post-humans, and she's willing to go to a lot of trouble to finish the job. She gets into a lot of arguments in the book: about the virtue of socialist anarchy versus the capitalist anarchy of New Mars, the sentience of those beings with uploaded minds, and whether the universe has any moral rule other than doing whatever you can get away with.
Macleod explores some of the implications in the ideas of Vernor Vinge's Singularity and copied, uploaded, and indentured minds familiar to readers of Phillip C. Jennings. This is a short book. The superscience isn't as astonishing as Peter Hamilton's work, but Macleod keeps his tale interesting and knows how to write a philosophical tale that moves.
Readers of George Zebrowski and Charles Pellegrino's THE KILLING STAR should especially like this, another novel where genocide is shown to have an unplesantly rational aspect to it.
This is the third book in a series. I haven't read the first two since this was the first published in America. But I had no trouble following the story or assimilating the background.

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