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Science, Fantasy

Freedom and Necessity epub ebook

by Steven Brust

Freedom and Necessity epub ebook

Author: Steven Brust
Category: Fantasy
Language: English
Publisher: Orb Books; 1st edition (April 17, 2007)
Pages: 448 pages
ISBN: 0765316803
ISBN13: 978-0765316806
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 566
Other formats: mbr azw doc lit


A phenomenal achievement.

A phenomenal achievement. I wish there were more books with this wonderful combination of deep thought and fast plot. Highly recommended to readers of Victoriana, historical novels, fantasy adventure and just plain old popular fiction that verges on the literary. 3 people found this helpful.

Freedom and Necessity book.

Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and raised in a family of Hungarian labor organizers, Steven Brust worked as a musician and a computer programmer before coming to prominence as a writer in 1983 with Jhereg, the first of his novels about Vlad Taltos, a human professional assassin in a world dominated by long-lived, magically-empowered human-like "Dragaerans.

Dear Internet Archive Supporters, Thank you for helping us reach our fundraising goal. You keep us going and growing – with your support we will do even more in 2020. Happy New Year! –The Internet Archive Team. We’ve reached our goal! Dear Internet Archive Supporters, Thank you for helping us reach our fundraising goal.

Across Europe, the high tide of revolution has crested, leaving recrimination and betrayal in its wake. From the high councils of Prussia to the corridors of Parliament, the powers-that-be breathe sighs of relief. But the powers-that-be are hardly unified among themselves.

Freedom and Necessity. Chapter 12 of Philosophical Essays, 1954. WHEN I am said to have done something of my own free will it is implied that I could have acted otherwise; and it is only when it is believed that I could have acted otherwise that I am held to be morally responsible for what I have done. Now it is commonly assumed both that men are capable of acting freely, in the sense that is required to make them morally responsible, and that human behaviour is entirely governed by causal laws: and it is the apparent conflict between these two assumptions that gives rise to the philosophical problem of the freedom of the will.

Steven Brust and Emma Bull have crafted a masterful mix of fantasy and historical fiction. Library Journal on Freedom and Necessity. Complex and masterly. Not since Wilkie Collins or Conan Doyle has there been such a profusion of guns, swordfights, family intrigues, women disguised as men, occult societies, philosophical discussions, and, of course, passionate romance. Connect with the author. A skilful act of ventriloquism, faithfully reproducing the argot of the early Victorian upper classes with only a few lapses, and plausibily weaving the plot into the politics at the time. Imaginative and finely written. Interzone on Freedom and Necessity. Brust and Bull's historical fantasy-mystery recalls George Macdonald Fraser's Flashman adventures in the creative use of a rich historical background and also echoes the pioneering Victorian mysteries of Wilkie Collins in offering the reader a convoluted puzzle. It begins with the apparent demise of a fashionable young Englishman in a boating accident, then gathers speed as the deceased's cousin receives a letter from him.

Freedom and Necessity (with Emma Bull). A tom doherty associates book. This is a work of fiction. Published by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC. 175 Fifth Avenue.

Used availability for Steven Brust's Freedom and Necessity. February 1997 : USA Hardback. September 2000 : USA Paperback.

It is 1849. Across Europe, the high tide of revolution has crested, leaving recrimination and betrayal in its wake. From the high councils of Prussia to the corridors of Parliament, the powers-that-be breathe sighs of relief. But the powers-that-be are hardly unified among themselves. Far from it . . .

On the south coast of England, London man-about-town James Cobham comes to himself in a country inn, with no idea how he got there. Corresponding with his brother, he discovers he has been presumed drowned in a boating accident. Together they decide that he should stay put for the moment, while they investigate what may have transpired. For James Cobham is a wanted man―wanted by conspiring factions of the government and the Chartists alike, and also targeted by a magical conspiracy inside his own family.

And so the adventure of Freedom and Necessity begins… leading the reader through every corner of mid-nineteenth-century Britain, from the parlors of the elite to the dens of the underclass. Steven Brust and Emma Bull have crafted a masterful mix of fantasy and historical fiction. Not since Wilkie Collins or Conan Doyle has there been such a profusion of guns, swordfights, family intrigues, women disguised as men, occult societies, philosophical discussions, and, of course, passionate romance.

Reviews (7)
Gardagar
Freedom and Necessity, while published as fantasy by two authors known for their fantasy is a hard novel to categorize in terms of genre. First it is an epistolary historical novel, told in almost perfect Victorian mimicry set just after the Chartist Revolution. The single fantasy element, a magical conspiracy and plot by a secret society using magic both Kabbalistic and Celtic doesn't quite rise to high fantasy, because as with life, the reality of the spiritual and magical elements depends upon the beliefs of the reader. As other reviewers have noted, the letters, journal entries and other created and real documents that comprise the narrative also include a huge slice of nineteenth century formal and social philosophy and the characters discuss the philosophies among themselves as well. It is a brilliant novel and includes a hair-raising adventure to discern and foil the plot as well as a vibrant and sincere love story between two adult equals. In short, Freedom and Necessity is enthralling and challenging and reveals more with every re-read.

James Cobham, thought drowned at a family party, comes to his senses, injured and ill in a country inn with confusing and fragmented memories of how he spent the last two months, or so he writes his cousin, Richard Cobham. The two cousins, along with Richard's wife Kitty and another cousin, Susan try to unravel the mystery of James's missing months and the political and familial plots arrayed against him. The letters and the characters traverse much of England, Ireland, Continental philosophy, Victorian social and political conditions and the birth of Communism as a philosophy. The answers to the puzzle are meted out at exactly the right pace and are everything the reader could hope - the perfect blend of magic and realism.

I was unfamiliar with the work of either Brust or Bull when I bought this book, but became familiar with it on the strength of this work, which is different than anything either writer has produced before. The characterization is especially strong too. These are real people, good people who make mistakes in a complex situation based on both personal flaws and misreading of the motives of others and their own. The love stories are a joy to read conducted as they are between real, whole people. Freedom and Necessity has become an all time favorite book of mine and I re-read it every few years. The complexity of the plot, the philosophy, the characters and the language keep this book evergreen for the reader. A phenomenal achievement. I wish there were more books with this wonderful combination of deep thought and fast plot. Highly recommended to readers of Victoriana, historical novels, fantasy adventure and just plain old popular fiction that verges on the literary.

Runeshaper
It's rare to come across a book that drives me to buy and send it to friends. Usually I will just recommend a book - but this one I happily have sent on at my own expense. I'm very cheap.
A well-written X-Files meets Sherlock Holmes meets Lovecraft, meets Emma Bull and Steven Brust. Throw in the beginnings of communism and the 19th Century British Labor movement, elite British families, and a hearty dose of feminism, and you've got magic. (really - it works far better than you'd imagine!)
Emma Bull is one of the great unsung writers of her generation. I stumbled across her 'War for the Oaks' in a used book store years ago, and was blown away. I then did the same with 'Falcon' and was again surprised. Unfortunately, she has been sucked into 'genre' writing and storylines that just plain don't differentiate her. But she writes so very well!
I've never read anything by Steven Brust before, and I would guess that I'm one of the few out there that read this for Ms. Bull's reputation. But I'm going to be picking up his work soon.
Outstanding just for the style. A VERY SMART BOOK!

Valawye
This is one of my favourite books and I was delighted to find an ebook copy with only a few transcription errors. Great characters, complex relationships and lots of goings on with the odd historical figure.

Der Bat
This is my favorite book. I have purchased three different copies over the years. Oh how I wish it came in a kindle format

Oghmaghma
I LOVE this book, but I will admit it's not for everyone. I read a lot of sf/fantasy, but the best comparison I can come up with is A.S. Byatt's "Posession". If you enjoyed "Posession" I think you will enjoy this book. The story can be a bit hard to follow, but I enjoy flipping back to reread pages that are later referred to. Great mystery, intrique, murder and attempted murder, and, to quote the back cover "of course, passionate romance". Wonderful fun!

generation of new
I picked this book up after reading a piece in which China Mieville recommended it, and I really wanted to like it more than I did. The authors certainly faithfully reproduce the sound and feel of the mid-Victorian English lower aristocracy quite well, and in general, their historical re-imaginings were acceptably within the realm of the possible. The atmosphere of High Philosophy lent an edge of gravitas to the political hijinks going on (Hegel's Science of Logic is a recurring motif, although that is not his most influential work; The Phenomenology of Spirit is), and Friedrich Engels makes a cameo appearance that is fun too. The problem for me was that the epistolary style is just so incredibly dense, even rather foreign, that it took me forever to wade through the book. Usually I don't care for the complaint that a book is too long, but in this instance, I find it apt. I was enjoying it through about page 300 or so, but thereafter I was quite ready for them to start wrapping things up, yet there were still 200 increasingly tedious pages to go. This one's a tough call, then: I'd recommend it if you're a patient reader and inclined toward Victorian literature like Dickens or Thackeray or Eliot. But if you just want a ripping good yarn and don't want to have to work overly hard for a payoff (and, in my opinion, it wasn't too great an ending), and/or if you're expecting science fiction or fantasy, well, this probably isn't going to be your cup of tea. Myself, I probably could have used a half-cup instead, and with perhaps a little more sweetener....

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