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Science, Fantasy

The Last Four Things epub ebook

by Paul Hoffman

The Last Four Things epub ebook

Author: Paul Hoffman
Category: Fantasy
Language: English
Publisher: Dutton (August 4, 2011)
Pages: 384 pages
ISBN: 0525952187
ISBN13: 978-0525952183
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 403
Other formats: rtf lit lrf lit


Home Paul Hoffman The Last Four Things. The Left Hand of God. The Last Four Things.

Home Paul Hoffman The Last Four Things. an imprint of. Penguin books. Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. Penguin Group (USA) In. 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, USA. Penguin Group (Canada), 90 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4P 2Y3 (a division of Pearson Penguin Canada In. Penguin Ireland, 25 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, Ireland (a division of Penguin Books Ltd).

In "The Last Four Things", rather than move away from such gleeful plagiarism of the sordid history of man and religion, Hoffman steps in waste deep and provides a never ending stream of references. If you are reading carefully you will see knocks on Swiss neutrality, copious (and sometimes artfully corrupted) quotes from the King James Bible, references to historical battles and events, and a thinly veiled Talleyrand moving political chess pieces on behalf of an inept sovereign.

Автор: Hoffman, Paul Название: The Last Four Things Издательство: Random House (USA) . Описание: Offers the third and final instalment in the epic Paul Hoffman trilogy following Cale and the Sanctuary of the Redeemers.

Автор: Hoffman, Paul Название: The Last Four Things Издательство: Random House (USA) Классификация: ISBN: 0525952187 ISBN-13(EAN): 9780525952183 ISBN: 0-525-95218-7 ISBN-13(EAN): 978-0-525-95218-3 Обложка/Формат: Hardcover Дата издания: 0. 8.

Paul Hoffman (born 1956) is a prominent author and host of the PBS television series "Great Minds of Science. He lives in Woodstock, New York. Author of at least ten books, he has appeared on "CBS This Morning" and "The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer" as a correspondent.

This reading of The Last Four Things was my second and I still don't quite know quite what to make of it, so I will simply try to pass . Let's start first with the things I have liked most about the two Paul Hoffman books I have read.

This reading of The Last Four Things was my second and I still don't quite know quite what to make of it, so I will simply try to pass on the feelings experienced whilst reading it. First off, I enjoyed it far less than The Left Hand of God - of that there is no doubt. Yes, the second pass was a better experience but while the first book's good points heavily outweighed the bad the second book drove me to distraction on many occasions. I really like the characters, especially the dialogue between them, with it often being irreverently humorous and with a feel of authenticity.

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The Last Four Things. Paul Hoffman’s newest novel, The Left Hand Of God, certainly delivers the terrible goods. Author: Hoffman, Paul. There’s gloom aplenty here, but it’s tempered by a sly wit, complex characters, and a narrative engine that grinds all objections to dust. epic tale, full of grand passions that twist in the hand like a knife blade.

Death, Judgement, Heaven and Hell These are The Last Four Things Now there are Five Meet Thomas Cale. Returning to the Sanctuary of the Redeemers - Thomas Cale is told by the Lord Militant that the destruction of mankind is necessary - the only way to undo God's greatest mistake.

Death, Judgement, Heaven and Hell These are the Last Four Things Now there are Five; Meet Thomas Cale.

The epic story of Thomas Cale-introduced so memorably in The Left Hand of God--continues as the Redeemers use his prodigious gifts to further their sacred goal: the extinction of humankind and the end of the world. To the warrior-monks known as the Redeemers, who rule over massive armies of child slaves, "the last four things" represent the culmination of a faithful life. Death. Judgement. Heaven. Hell. The last four things represent eternal bliss-or endless destruction, permanent chaos, and infinite pain. Perhaps nowhere are the competing ideas of heaven and hell exhibited more clearly than in the dark and tormented soul of Thomas Cale. Betrayed by his beloved but still marked by a child's innocence, possessed of a remarkable aptitude for violence but capable of extreme tenderness, Cale will lead the Redeemers into a battle for nothing less than the fate of the human race. And though his broken heart foretells the bloody trail he will leave in pursuit of a personal peace he can never achieve, a glimmer of hope remains. The question even Cale can't answer: When it comes time to decide the fate of the world, to ensure the extermination of humankind or spare it, what will he choose? To express God's will on the edge of his sword, or to forgive his fellow man-and himself?
Reviews (7)
Ielonere
Having just enjoyed the first book in the series, The Left Hand of God, I was excited for The Last Four Things. I had read the former in a matter of days and liked the world Hoffman had built and the detail with which he had imbued it. I expected no less from The Last Four Things.

One month after beginning the book, I have finally finished. Compared to its predecessor, it's a slow, laborious read. The detail that I loved about the world is still there, as well as the addition of interesting new groups of people in it, but by contrast to the first, it's a war book. Where Left Hand was filled with fantastic scenes of Cale's individual struggle, Last Four Things mostly describes the large scale tactics of various battles and political machinations. Individual characters take a secondary role to large groups and their movements through the narrative (the Klepths, Laconics, Purgators, clergy members of Chartres) and as a result the book feels far less personal than did the first. Consider the analogy of the dog in a disaster movie: though thousands of people are dying, that dog will survive as an emotional anchor for the audience. Though thousands are dying here, the emotional anchors of individual interesting characters are mostly gone.

My other gripe has to do with Mr. Hoffman's editorial prose. His omniscient narrator is constantly winking at the audience with his language, pointing out dramatic irony and calling attention to himself as a pseudo-character. Like film editing, the best narration make you forget that it exists.

Nevertheless, I will definitely read the third book. Hoffman has set the stakes extremely high, and he has made believable the large-scale conflict, as well as Cale's role within it. I hope that the conclusion focuses less on the battles and more on the people that welcomed me into the world in the first place.

Dalallador
In this follow up to his first work "The Left Hand of God", Paul Hoffman settles into his voice in a spectacular fashion. When I read the first book I was intrigued but a little put off by his hodgepodge of historical references and geographic mishmash. In "The Last Four Things", rather than move away from such gleeful plagiarism of the sordid history of man and religion, Hoffman steps in waste deep and provides a never ending stream of references. If you are reading carefully you will see knocks on Swiss neutrality, copious (and sometimes artfully corrupted) quotes from the King James Bible, references to historical battles and events, and a thinly veiled Talleyrand moving political chess pieces on behalf of an inept sovereign. This time, instead of being put off I was drawn in and completely absorbed. My head made connections to real events and places that were outside the story and I began to take great pleasure in discovering these little side trips.

Of course it helps that Paul Hoffman is an exceptionally descriptive writer. The battle scenes (always a struggle on paper) are engrossing. Hoffman produces a bleak landscape and his fertile mind produces some of the most interesting "dark" characters in recent memory. A hallmark is the fanatical cruelty of the "Redeemers" - men who make the most horrific acts against others a mark of religious fervor. Perhaps that is where I was most struck by Hoffman's unapologetic pilfering of historical events. As a student of history his descriptions of battles and executions tickled my brain often enough for me to be appalled. While it's true that Hoffman has compressed these acts into a small time span. It's equally true that he's not simply "making it up" as he goes along (although his descriptive embellishments are memorable). He is instead drawing from a wealth of horrific crimes that man has been guilty of in the name of faith.

In the end I received a great deal of pleasure from the story. The pacing is terrific. The plot takes some wonderful twists away from the "boy messiah" journey I was expecting. I'm anxiously awaiting the next book in the series. In the meantime I might just read this one again while chanting softly to myself - "Death, Judgement, Heaven and Hell... The last four things on which we dwell".

Styphe
(This is copied from my blog.) I had mentioned my uneasiness about Hoffman's The Left Hand of God a few months ago, because of a very uneven style, a plot borrowing so much to real events and locations, and a highly ambiguous central character. I nonetheless read the second tome, The Last Four Things, following a request from my son. My impression has definitely not improved, mostly again for a high rate of shameful borrowing from existing facts and places (like the nearby cathedral city Chartres used for the papal seat). The title itself is found in many books and comes from a painting by Bosch (painting that I missed in Madrid last time I visited El Prado museum). The characters are mostly the same ones as in The Left Hand of God and they remain shallow and unconvincing. The political plot(s) are of no interest whatsoever. The reunion between Cale and Arbell is botched, to say the least. (And still some people love it!)

Mavivasa
I'm an avid audiobook listener and this is one of my favorites. The version read by Steve West is expectional, however, I did not enjoy the other narrator. Its rare to find a writer as developed as Paul Hoffman. Most famous authors write on a low grade level but Hoffman elevates his readers instead of talking down to them.
Hoffman received a great deal of critisizm about this series and I invite any reader or listener to review Paul's rebutal found at the end of book 3 "The Beating of His Wings", if you don't care for what he saud or disagree then don't invest in the series, but I feel he did a great job answering his critics.
Please forgive my spelling and grammar error.

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