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Cantonese (Teach Yourself Complete Courses) epub ebook

by Hanson Ho,Ho Pui-Kei,Hugh Baker

Cantonese (Teach Yourself Complete Courses) epub ebook

Author: Hanson Ho,Ho Pui-Kei,Hugh Baker
Category: Foreign Language Study & Reference
Language: English
Publisher: Hodder Arnold; 2nd edition (March 31, 2003)
Pages: 368 pages
ISBN: 0340860359
ISBN13: 978-0340860359
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 250
Other formats: rtf lrf docx lit


These complete courses are based on thievery latest learning methods and designed to be enjoyable and user-friendly.

These complete courses are based on thievery latest learning methods and designed to be enjoyable and user-friendly

These complete courses are based on thievery latest learning methods and designed to be enjoyable and user-friendly.

These complete courses are based on thievery latest learning methods and designed to be enjoyable and user-friendly

Cantonese (Teach Yourself Complete Courses). Published April 30th 2003 by Teach Yourself.

Baker, Hanson Ho. ISBN: 0844238929 (ISBN13: 9780844238920). Cantonese (Teach Yourself Complete Courses). Paperback, 352 pages. Baker, Hanson Ho., Pui-Kei Ho. ISBN

by Hugh Baker & Pui-Kei H.

Teach Yourself Swedish Complete Course. 87 MB·2,205 Downloads·New! Functional and fun, this course offers full pronunciation guides, grammar summaries, dialogues. 45 MB·972 Downloads·New!

These complete courses are based on the very latest learning methods and designed to be enjoyable and user-friendly

Teach Yourself Cantonese Complete Course Audiopack. This book uses Yale Cantonese Romanization which is the most intuitive Romanization system for native English speakers

Teach Yourself Cantonese Complete Course Audiopack. This book uses Yale Cantonese Romanization which is the most intuitive Romanization system for native English speakers. The book is broken up into 26 different chapters with two dialogues and sets of vocabulary each.

Hugh Baker taught Chinese (Cantonese and Mandarin) for 36 years at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Hugh Baker taught Chinese (Cantonese and Mandarin) for 36 years at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.

Reviews (2)
Fountain_tenderness
This book is horribly written. The authors believe that adding 'silent' consonants to indicate pure vowel pronunciations would help the average self-study student. I was already confused reading the book, and that's saying a lot since I am a Chinese-American who was hoping to brush up on grammar and vocabulary. That is impossible to do with this book. An example of the horrific phonetics in this book follows - a sentence which could be written as "Nei tai-tai ho ma? Keui duo ho, yau sum." (means 'How is your wife doing? She's also doing well) is written as "Nrei taai-taai hou maa? Krei dhou hou, yrau-sahm." So if you ignore all the r's in the sentence, you just *might* be able to figure out the pronunciation - since this spelling is perpetuated throughout the book, it's difficult to focus on actually learning the language. Also, the book only includes a cantonese-english glossary, not vice versa. For example, it would be impossible look up the meaning of the word "car". But, you would be able to find the word 'chhe' and see that it means 'car' in english. I don't understand how anyone could learn cantonese with this book, but I'm hoping better self-study series exist.

Braswyn
Teach Yourself Cantonese (Teach Yourself Complete Courses)
This isn't too bad, but it has serious problems:
(1) Some of the vocabulary is now out of style, at least in Hong Kong (I suspect even more so in Guangdong). For example, "brothers" (hingdaih) is only used by old people or in special contexts (underworld)
(2) the Chinese characters are printed in the same size print as the English, i.e. they are too small and the complex characters are difficult to read.
(3) the vocabulary lists in the back do not refer to page numbers (only section) and don't have Chinese characters at all.
(4) romanization system leaves much to be desired. One has to keep remembering that "ch" is pronounced ts, "N" = L, etc.
(5) the cover says you can "learn to speak" with this system, but you'd really need a tutor to get the pronunciation intelligible, even (or perhaps especially) if you already speak Mandarin.
(6) An essential complement to the book/CDs would be Cantodict: [...] This allows one to work around some of the deficiencies.
All that said, I've found it very useful. (I disagree with a previous reviewer that the CDs should have more English; the book suffices.)
--Jim

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