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Want to Start a Revolution?: Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle epub ebook

by Jeanne Theoharis,Komozi Woodard,Dayo F. Gore

Want to Start a Revolution?: Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle epub ebook

Author: Jeanne Theoharis,Komozi Woodard,Dayo F. Gore
Category: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: NYU Press (December 1, 2009)
Pages: 370 pages
ISBN: 0814783147
ISBN13: 978-0814783146
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 526
Other formats: docx txt rtf lit


WANT TO START A REVOLUTION? is a major intervention in the literature on the black freedom struggle in the United States.

In the spirit of the radical women it profiles, Want to Start a Revolution? promises to educate, invigorate, excite, and inspire. Anne M. Valk,author of Radical Sisters: Second-Wave Feminism and Black Liberation in Washington, . WANT TO START A REVOLUTION? is a major intervention in the literature on the black freedom struggle in the United States. It aims at nothing less than a re-envisioning of African American radicalism, which it does by placing women at the core of the struggle in the 20th century.

Want to Start a Revolution? book. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, or rank and file party members. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, J. Malcolm X, and Huey Newton.

Dayo F. Gore is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Critical Gender Studies at the University of California, San Diego . Gore is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Critical Gender Studies at the University of California, San Diego and has previously taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Book Description: The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, J. Indeed, they insisted on the need to connect manhood and blackness.

Want to Start a Revolution? 600 printed pages. The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, J. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist who became a leader of the National Negro Labor Council and guide to Malcolm X on his travels through Africa? What about Shirley Chisholm, the first black Congresswoman?

Dayo F. Gore, Jeanne Theoharis, Komozi Woodard, ed. Radical Black Women, Leadership, and the Struggle for Liberation. Gore, Jeanne Theoharis, Komozi Woodard, eds. Want to Start a Revolution?: Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle.

The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, J. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist who became a leader of the National Negro Labor Council and guide to Malcolm X on his travels through Africa? What about Shirley Chisholm, the first black Congresswoman?

Gore, Dayo, Theoharis, Jeanne, and Woodard, Komozi. Want to Start a Revolution?

Gore, Dayo, Theoharis, Jeanne, and Woodard, Komozi. Want to Start a Revolution? : Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle. New York, NY, USA: New York University Press (NYU Press), 2009.

Authors: Dayo Gore Dayo F Gore Jeanne Theoharis Komozi Woodard . Free shipping on rental returns. 21-day refund guarantee Learn More.

The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, or rank and file party members. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist who became a leader of the National Negro Labor Council and guide to Malcolm X on his travels through Africa? What about Shirley Chisholm, the first black Congresswoman?

From Rosa Parks and Esther Cooper Jackson, to Shirley Graham DuBois and Assata Shakur, a host of women demonstrated a lifelong commitment to radical change, embracing multiple roles to sustain the movement, founding numerous groups and mentoring younger activists. Helping to create the groundwork and continuity for the movement by operating as local organizers, international mobilizers, and charismatic leaders, the stories of the women profiled in Want to Start a Revolution? help shatter the pervasive and imbalanced image of women on the sidelines of the black freedom struggle.

Contributors: Margo Natalie Crawford, Prudence Cumberbatch, Johanna Fern√°ndez, Diane C. Fujino, Dayo F. Gore, Joshua Guild, Gerald Horne, Ericka Huggins, Angela D. LeBlanc-Ernest, Joy James, Erik McDuffie, Premilla Nadasen, Sherie M. Randolph, James Smethurst, Margaret Stevens, and Jeanne Theoharis.

Reviews (4)
Rindyt
WANT TO START A REVOLUTION? is a major intervention in the literature on the black freedom struggle in the United States. It aims at nothing less than a re-envisioning of African American radicalism, which it does by placing women at the core of the struggle in the 20th century. The volume reveals women at work across time and space and in numerous movements and settings. It shows, too, incredible political transgression--that is, the ease and abandon with which women in struggle moved across organizational, ideological and other boundaries that were supposed to be fixed and impenetrable.

In this volume, such transgressions are encountered from beginning to end. Consider Esther Cooper Jackson, the subject of the first chapter. Middle-class in background, she encountered the communist movement as a graduate student at Fisk University before ending up at Freedomways magazine, from which podium she powerfully mediated the inter-connections and inter-locutions between multiple traditions in the black freedom struggle. Consider, too, Johnnie Tillmon, whose story is told in the last chapter of the volume. Descended from sharecroppers, her political career demonstrated the suppleness and power of Black Power, which previously took a drubbing from scholars for allegedly mashing up the Civil Rights movement. WANT TO START A REVOLUTION, along with a number of other recent works, definitively refutes and corrects such fallacies, and indeed shows that there were no inseparable lines between Civil Rights and Black Power. This verity is well exemplified in the life and labor of Johnnie Tillmon, in whose hands Black Power became an ideology for defending poor single mothers and welfare recipients like herself. Organizationally, the result was the militant National Welfare Rights Organization.

Between Cooper and Tillmon, WANT TO START A REVOLUTION presents a cast of equally fascinating activists (Vicki Garvin, Shirley Graham Du Bois, Rosa Parks, Assata Shakur, Flo Kennedy, Shirley Chisholm, Denise Oliver and Yuri Kochiyama, among them) and movements (the Panthers' Oakland Community School, the Young Lords, and Atlanta's Black Arts scene, among them). Vicki Garvin probably summed it up best. "While I was a pan-Africanist, I was a proletarian, working class, internationalist," she is quoted as saying in the chapter on her. She failed to add that she was also a feminist, but perhaps that went without saying.

Like the women and movements it chronicles, WANT TO START A REVOLUTION is a book for all seasons. Academic specialists will find it novel and refreshing both because of the new information it contains and its bold paradigmatic challenges. The volume is also accessible and engaging, which makes it an excellent undergraduate text. Last, but certainly not least, WANT TO START A REVOLUTION will inspire and excite activists, providing them something of a handbook from which many lesson may be learned and many techniques gleaned.

August
I needed this book for a class and I was really excited to see that it arrived very soon. When I ordered it I thought I'd have to wait a couple weeks, but a few days and the book was on my front porch. I was very grateful. ^__^

-J.D. Kirkland

DireRaven
Highlighting these women's radical politics makes visible their convergence at the center of the Black Revolt. For example, as Black Panthers Elaine Brown, Bobby Seale, and Ericka Huggins campaigned for local political office in March 1972, 16,000 people gathered at a rally in Oakland, California to hear Johnnie Tillmon and Shirley Chisholm support the grassroots politics and voter registration efforts of the Black Panther Party. The cover photo of this book, taken by photographer Leroy Henderson, depicts Rosa Parks at the Gary Convention gazing at a poster of Malcolm X who she had long admired. Henderson photographed numerous demonstrations and Black caucuses in the 1960s and 1970s. "I was there with my camera watching, recognizing people, and grabbing candid shots of them. .... capturing this stuff for future generations... Like the time I was at the Black Political Convention in Gary Indiana ... Standing at this poster table was a lady nobody even seemed to know who she was... I knew it was Rosa Parks."

Just as the work of these radical women in the political arena changed the complexion of black political culture, the examination of women's activism in this volume will reorient studies of black radicalism by expanding its boundaries beyond self-defense and separatism and by articulating its roots in labor, civil rights, and early autonomous black feminist politics that came to flower in the postwar era. Pulling together the stories of Rosa Parks, Vicki Garvin, Toni Cade Bambara, Shirley Chisholm, Johnnie Tillmon and Assata Shakur in one collection uncovers an obscured history of postwar radicalism. Major contours of Black Radicalism have been impossible to see because the commitment, resilience, and longevity of these women have rarely shared the same page. Often defined in vastly different terms, these women seem to represent separate, mutually exclusive political movements. Yet bringing the work of these women together presents a powerful demonstration not only of their individual achievements but also the collective force of black women activists as strategic thinkers, leaders, and architects of postwar radicalism.

Tamesya
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