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The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling epub ebook

by Arlie Russell Hochschild

The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling epub ebook

Author: Arlie Russell Hochschild
Category: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: University of California Press; Soft Cover Clean & Tight Contents edition (August 14, 1985)
Pages: 307 pages
ISBN: 0520054547
ISBN13: 978-0520054547
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 291
Other formats: docx doc lrf mobi


Arlie Russell Hochschild is a Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley

Arlie Russell Hochschild is a Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley.

The Managed Heart Commercialization of Human Feeling, Updated with a New Preface. by Arlie Russell Hochschild (Author). Her articles have appeared in Harper’s, Mother Jones, and The New York Times Magazine, among others.

The Managed Heart book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Commercialization of Human Feeling. By Arlie Russell Hochschild. Working mothers frustrated with the expectations they face. Arlie Russell Hochschild is a Professor Emerita of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. Her latest book is Strangers In Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right.

The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling, by Arlie Russell Hochschild, was first published in 1983. It was reissued in 2012 with a new preface

The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling, by Arlie Russell Hochschild, was first published in 1983. It was reissued in 2012 with a new preface. It has been translated into German (Campus Press), Chinese (Laureate Books, Taipei, Taiwan), Japanese (Sekai Shisosha, Kyoto, Japan), Polish (Polish Scientific Publishers PWN), and French (La Découverte, 2017).

Arlie Russell Hochschild is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. She is author of The Commercialization of Intimate Life: Notes from Home and Work (2003), The Time Bind: When Work Becomes Home and Home Becomes Work (1997), The Second Shift: Working Parents and the Revolution at Home (1989), and The Managed Heart: The Commercialization of Human Feeling (California, 1983), all cited as notable books of the year.

Arlie russell hochschild. This book was also the winner of the Charles Cooley Award in 1983, awarded by the American Sociological Association and received an honorable mention for the C. Wright Mills Award. AfterThe Managed Heartfirst appeared, I began to receive visits from flight attendants, nurses, and others who did emotional labor for a living and to receive long letters from scholars who wanted to study it. From both, I learned much more about emotional labor than I knew when I wrote the book. She is author of The Commercialization of Intimate Life: Notes from Home and Work (2003), The Time Bind: When Work Becomes Home and Home Becomes Work (1997), The Second Shift: Working Parents and the Revolution at Home (1989), and The Managed Heart: The Commercialization of Human Feeling (California, 1983), all cited as notable books of.

Because of its wide resonance, The Managed Heart, Commercialization of Human Feeling, by Arlie Russell Hochschild, (Hochschild 1983/85) might be taken to represent this kind of sociology. Hochschild’s book appeared in 1983, and in the same year it received the New York Times Book of the Year Award. Later it received other awards, and it is now being translated into German. And indeed, the book reads very well, although from a al perspective its contents is disappointing.

by Arlie Russell Hochschild. Knock, And He'll open the door. Vanish, And He'll make you shine like the sun.

In private life, we try to induce or suppress love, envy, and anger through deep acting or "emotion work," just as we manage our outer expressions of feeling through surface acting. In trying to bridge a gap between what we feel and what we "ought" to feel, we take guidance from "feeling rules" about what is owing to others in a given situation. Based on our private mutual understandings of feeling rules, we make a "gift exchange" of acts of emotion management. We bow to each other not simply from the waist, but from the heart.But what occurs when emotion work, feeling rules, and the gift of exchange are introduced into the public world of work? In search of the answer, Arlie Hochschild closely examines two groups of public-contact workers: flight attendants and bill collectors. The flight attendant’s job is to deliver a service and create further demand for it, to enhance the status of the customer and be "nicer than natural." The bill collector’s job is to collect on the service, and if necessary, to deflate the status of the customer by being "nastier than natural." Between these extremes, roughly one-third of American men and one-half of American women hold jobs that call for substantial emotional labor. In many of these jobs, they are trained to accept feeling rules and techniques of emotion management that serve the company’s commercial purpose.Just as we have seldom recognized or understood emotional labor, we have not appreciated it cost to those who do it for a living. Like a physical laborer who becomes estranged from what he or she makes, an emotional laborer, such as a flight attendant, can become estranged not only from her own expressions of feeling (her smile is not "her" smile), but also from what she actually feels (her managed friendliness). This estrangement, though a valuable defense against stress, is also an important occupational hazard, because it is through our feelings that we are connected with those around us.On the basis of this book, Hochschild was featured in Key Sociological Thinkers, edited by Rob Stones. This book was also the winner of the Charles Cooley Award in 1983, awarded by the American Sociological Association and received an honorable mention for the C. Wright Mills Award.
Reviews (7)
Enone
Discovered my love of emotional labor as a graduate student in Industrial Psychology. This is a must for any industrial organizational psychologist. My favorite professor suggested Erving Hoffman was the originator of emotional labor, so I've ordered all his books too - I can't seem to get enough of this subject. As society becomes more commercialized, we must acknowledge the toll of "performing" on service employees, especially in health care!

Usanner
In this seminal thesis, Hochschild in a sense shows how Marx is relevant even in the era of falling industrialization and rising service sectors. In his write-up "Estranged Labour", Karl Marx argues that industrialization leads to various sorts of alienation among the workers. A worker is alienated from her/his creative self/crafts since s/he gets to do a very small part of the whole product. For the same reason, a worker is alienated from the product as well as other workers. This alienation, in Marx's arguments, alienate workers from the owners of capital as well. There was sense that rising service sectors could reduce the noted sources of alienation argued by Marx. However, Hochschild shows that not necessarily so. In service sectors, workers are supposed to fake their emotions (have consequences for their own emotions, & for their social relations as well).

A must read for anyone interested in sociology of work and life.

Abdullah Shahid, Cornell University

Hulis
Still reading but it's an important topic

MOQ
all ok

Bliss
Arlie Hochschild's research often brings out the most interesting aspects of our mundane practices. Here, primarily by analyzing the experiences of airline stewardesses, Hochschild tackles the question of what happens when, in our hyper consumer culture, one's emotions become commodified, when our feelings become a product? For service industries - hence the stewardesses - Hochschild finds that it isn't just delivering drinks that is part of the product; it is also one's smile and positive attitude that is similarly included (no matter how much you might want to dump a drink on the guy in the second row). As one can likely imagine, emotional commercialization doesn't lead to the best of outcomes: burnout and an inability to parse out on-stage and off-stage emotions.

This book is great for those interested in sociology of emotions, the effects of modernizations and commercialization, and anyone hankering for another reason to not like consumer culture. For me, this book stands as a model for what good sociological writing can be like: insightful, entertaining and inspiring.

Bloodfire
My doughter use thi book in the colleges and she think is great and help the students to learn the class.

Saimath
I received this book and thank you for having it. This is one of the books I did not think I would find for such a reasonable price. Much appreciated.

Fantastic work, great research...,great Subject, but need a follow up Book...to see how things are done now at DL...

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