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Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's epub ebook

by John Elder Robison

Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's epub ebook

Author: John Elder Robison
Category: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Ebury Press (February 7, 2008)
Pages: 304 pages
ISBN: 0091924693
ISBN13: 978-0091924690
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 380
Other formats: docx mbr mbr doc


I hugely enjoyed reading Look Me in the Eye. This book is a wild rollercoaster ride through John . It opens up a window into the life of someone who has Asperger's Syndrome.

I hugely enjoyed reading Look Me in the Eye. This book is a wild rollercoaster ride through John Robison’s life-from troubled teenage prankster to successful employment in electronics, music, and classic cars. It was by far one of the easiest books for me to read. It flowed and kept my attention throughout, from beginning to end.

And Asperger’s is turning out to be surprisingly common: A February 2007 report from the federal Centers for Disease . Asperger’s is something you are born with-not something that happens later in life

That’s almost two million people in the United States alone. Asperger’s is something you are born with-not something that happens later in life. It was evident in me at a very early age, but, unfortunately, no one knew what to look for. All my parents knew was that I was different from the other kids.

Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's is a New York Times bestseller by John Elder Robison, chronicling the author's life with Asperger syndrome and tough times growing up. Published in 2007 on the Crown imprint of Random House, Look Me in the Eye describes how Robison grew up as a misfit in the 1960s, at a time when the Asperger syndrome diagnosis did not exist in the United States. The book describes how Robison learns to fit in, without actually knowing why he was different

John Elder Robinson starts his story with his earliest memories -a failed attempt to make friends in a sandbox and . And he’s absolutely right. Look Me in the Eye is one of the few books on Asperger's Syndrome that is not a dry training manual on the condition.

And he’s absolutely right.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Includes a new postscript from the author and a reading group guide"-Page 4 of cover. Includes bibliographical references (pages 291-295). Memoir of John Robison whose odd behavior was explained when he was diagnosed with a form of autism called Asperger's syndrome when he was forty and the change that made in his life. A little misfit - A permanent playmate - Empathy - A trickster is born - I find a Porsche - The nightmare years - Assembly required - The dogs begin to fear me - I drop out of high school - Collecting the trash - The flaming washtub - I'm in.

Look Me in the Eye, published in 2007, is a memoir of John Elder Robison’s unique life. The tale chronicles a man with Asperger’s syndrome and the challenges he has faced throughout. From loneliness as a child to finding his niche in the world as an adult, Look Me in the. Eye exemplifies what it means to see the world from a different lens and persevere.

John Robison lives with his wife and son in Amherst, Massachusetts. His company, J E Robison Service, repairs and restores classic cars such as Jaguars, Land Rovers, Rolls Royces and Bentleys. Robison had difficulty all of his life relating to people, emotions, social situations. He was incredibly gifted in understanding electronics and math, but normal conversations baffled him. It wasn't until he was 40 yrs old that he was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome - a form of autism.

Sometimes I think I can relate better to a good machine than any kind of person. I’ve thought about why that is, and I’ve come up with a few ideas. One thought is that I control the machines. t interact as equals. No matter how big the machine, I am in charge. Machines don’t talk back. They are predictable. They don’t trick me, and they’re never mean. I have a lot of trouble reading other people. I am not very good at looking at people and knowing whether they like me, or they’re mad, or they’re just waiting for me to say something

From the time he was three or four years old, John Elder Robison realised that he was different from other people. He was unable to make eye contact or connect with other children, and by the time he was a teenager his odd habits - an inclination to blurt out non-sequiturs, obsessively dismantle radios or dig five-foot holes (and stick his younger brother in them) - had earned him the label 'social deviant'. It didn't help that his mother conversed with light fixtures and his father spent evenings pickling himself in sherry. Look Me in the Eye is his story of growing up with Asperger's syndrome - a form of autism - at a time when the diagnosis simply didn't exist. Along the way it also tells the story of two brothers born eight years apart yet devoted to each other: the author and his younger brother Chris, who would grow up to become bestselling author Augusten Burroughs. This book is a rare fusion of inspiration, dark comedy and insight into the workings of the human mind. For someone who has struggled all his life to connect with other people, Robison proves to be an extraordinary storyteller.
Reviews (7)
CopamHuk
I enjoyed this book. Robison had difficulty all of his life relating to people, emotions, social situations. He was incredibly gifted in understanding electronics and math, but normal conversations baffled him. It wasn't until he was 40 yrs old that he was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome - a form of autism. In this memoir he recounts his awkward childhood, few friends, the butt of jokes, being bullied. Even though he tested far above his schoolmates in intelligence, he dropped out of school before graduating. His home life was chaos, with an alcoholic father and a mother with mental issues. His expertise in electronics led to small jobs fixing amplifiers for local rock bands, and finally as the electronics special-effects guy for the band KISS. He entered the corporate world helping design inter-active games and early video games, but finally left when he was promoted to management and didn't like it (managing people was difficult, he was not able to use his hands and expertise, and the rat-race stress was too much). He went back to mechanics and opened a luxury car repair business. The parts of the memoir where he discusses his feelings and frustrations about relationships, and the Asperger's-related issues, are very good. But (as other reviewers have noted) there is way too much technical stuff about retrofitting fire-breathing guitars and designing games. Overall, a good memoir, if you can kind of scan over the super-techie parts.

Runeterror
John Elder, you are awesome for what you have overcome! We have a seven year old (also named John) who was diagnosed a few months ago. Trouble in school, self hate and other things are big things already. This memoir opened my eyes to an understanding of what we are dealing with on a daily basis; his anxiety; his lack of understanding at others expressions in speech, and body language; his frustration with other people not understanding his point the first time (He hates explaining things to "stupid" people). THANK YOU for sharing your story, it is amazing to see the hope of a bright future, the perseverance of someone who kept on trying new things and learned to work through difficulties and find a measure of satisfaction with life in spite of emotional and social adversity. People who read this book need to be sure and read the Preface and Prologue as they are an essential part of the book, as well. I read cover to cover with a pencil, marked it up with points to review and then went back and read the entire thing again.

Doulkree
My grandson was recently diagnosed as autistic. Being one of his caregivers for the last 4 years, I had not seen a difference in his actions and mine as a child or some even now. After scoring high in an Autism Spectrum Quotient test online, I spoke to my therapist. He suggested I read this book. After reading, pieces of my childhood started to fall into place and questions unanswered for the past 50 years began to make sense. This is a good read for anyone who suspects they may be on the spectrum, knows someone on the spectrum, or just wants to know more about autism.

Xisyaco
I have a young son who is 4 years old. He is atypical but very subtle when you meet him. Most people think his "traits" (sensitivity to sound, late potty train, echoing (repetitions of words), delay lack of communication flapping of arms when excited, lack of play with others) will be outgrown eventually. However, highly intelligent recognize letters and counts to 200 at age 2, reads, writes, spells, memorize downloadable from videos at age 2 1/2 years. As with motherly instincts, I insisted to the pediatrician that I need to see specialists which with persistency eventually happened. So with his second follow up in a few weeks with a child's developmental specialists, I decided to do some research by reading and watching videos of Aspergers. I don't know what the results will be with my son but at least I can be more knowledgeable about this topic.
This gives you understanding of how Aspergerians deal with social aspects, why they do what they do and that despite this condition (NOT a disease), they can still have a family, career....a fulfilling life. The only part that I didn't really care for is the details of his interests (experiments, pyrotechnics, trains). It was a bit boring to me but after reading this book, you will understand why. Overall, I think families should look into this book as a way to understand the perception of this way of life.

Mitynarit
This book is funny, insightful and eye opening. It opens up a window into the life of someone who has Asperger's Syndrome. John Robinson shares his story in a no nonsense way, it's totally honest and makes no excuses. It was by far one of the easiest books for me to read. It flowed and kept my attention throughout, from beginning to end. It was sweet in a lot of ways and a bit shocking in others, but I was able to get a real sense of how many children and adults live their daily lives who are on the spectrum. John Robinson was really likable and its hard to believe he wasn't able to make many friends as you really can see his personality shine through. I loved seeing the interactions with his brother and how it changed over the years. If you have a child on the spectrum, know of a child on the spectrum, or even if you don't this is a great afternoon read. I received this book for free in return for my honest opinion, no compensation was received.

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