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Politics, Social

One Less Car: Bicycling and the Politics of Automobility (Sporting) epub ebook

by Zack Furness

One Less Car: Bicycling and the Politics of Automobility (Sporting) epub ebook

Author: Zack Furness
Category: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Temple University Press (March 12, 2010)
Pages: 344 pages
ISBN: 1592136133
ISBN13: 978-1592136131
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 480
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In his original and exciting book,One Less Car,Zack Furness examines what it means historically, culturally . He connects bicycling to radical politics, public demonstrations, alternative media production (.

In his original and exciting book,One Less Car,Zack Furness examines what it means historically, culturally, socioeconomically, and politically to be a bicycle transportation advocate/activist. Presenting an underground subculture of bike enthusiasts who aggressively resist car culture, Furness maps out the cultural trajectories between mobility, technology, urban space and everyday life. 'zines), as well as to the development of community programs throughout the world.

Written by Zack Furness. Published by Temple University Press in 2010. When I was a younger, anarcho-punk bike commuter in Pittsburgh circa 1999, I never thought I'd end up writing a PhD dissertation and a book about bicycling and car culture. And I certainly never imagined that, 20 years later, I'd be cited in a study about women cyclists conducted by the Afghan National Cycling Federation.

In his original and exciting book, One Less Car, Zack Furness examines what it means historically, culturally . So I picked this book up hoping for an evenhanded treatment of all things to do with bicycling politics and culture.

In his original and exciting book, One Less Car, Zack Furness examines what it means historically, culturally, socioeconomically, and politically to be a bicycle transportation advocate/activist. Published by Temple University Press in 2010

Written by Zack Furness. PagesMediaBooks and magazinesBookOne Less Car: Bicycling and the Politics of Automobility. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español.

In his original and exciting book, One Less Car, Zack Furness examines what it means historically, culturally, socioeconomically, and po Although millions of people in the United States love to ride bicycles for exercise or leisure, statistics show that only 1 percent of the total . population uses bicycles for transportation-and barely half as many people bike to work. For Furness, bicycles not only liberate people from technology, they also support social and environmental justice. So, he asks, Why aren’t more Americans adopting them for their transportation needs?

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One Less Car: Bicycling and the Politics of Automobility. Steve Furness Contents. Born in 1977 in Pittsburgh, Furness earned a bachelor's degree in English from Pennsylvania State University, a master's degree and doctorate in Communication studies from the University of Pittsburgh, as well as a doctoral certificate in Women's Studies. He is currently Associate Professor of Communications at Penn State Greater Allegheny where he also serves as Communications Program Coordinator and. the WMKP Radio General Manager.

Within urban scenarios, NaSch lacks of flexibility to integrate heterogeneous road users like cars and bicycles. The tasks mentioned before are addressed in this paper, . we propose an approach for modeling and specification of urban mixed traffic simulations. As a first step (1), an extended graph as basis for traffic simulation has to be designed. For a concrete scenario, it will be automatically generated on basis of OpenStreetmap cartographical material. In his original and exciting book, One Less Car, Zack Furness examines what it means historically, culturally, socioeconomically, and politically to be a bicycle transportation advocate/activist. ‘zines), as well as to the development of community programs throughout the world.

Although millions of people in the United States love to ride bicycles for exercise or leisure, statistics show that only 1% of the total U.S. population ride bicycles for transportation--and barely half as many use bikes to commute to work. In his original and exciting book, One Less Car, Zack Furness examines what it means historically, culturally, socioeconomically, and politically to be a bicycle transportation advocate/activist. Presenting an underground subculture of bike enthusiasts who aggressively resist car culture, Furness maps out the cultural trajectories between mobility, technology, urban space and everyday life. He connects bicycling to radical politics, public demonstrations, environmentalism, alternative media production, as well as to the development of community programs throughout the world. One Less Car also positions the bicycle as an object with which to analyze and critique some of the dominant cultural and political formations in the U.S., particularly those connecting mobility to race, class and gender privilege. For Furness, bicycling is not just a way of getting from points A to B, it is a means for rethinking the world around us. In the series Sporting, edited by Amy Bass
Reviews (7)
Shalizel
A quick-read, whereas cycling advocates need more serious works like John Pucher's "City Cycling".

6 more words required for this review, What would Basho have said if told he needed more than 17 sylables in his poem about the old pond and the frog?

Furuike ya
Kawazu tobi komu
Mizu no oto.

Vojar
As a committed cycling advocate, I devour pretty much anything that covers the hobby. So I picked this book up hoping for an evenhanded treatment of all things to do with bicycling politics and culture.

Author Zack Furness first takes us on an historical tour which tends to get bogged down quite a bit when he often takes us, tangentially, into French situationist politics and Debordian Marxism. While it's not dreadfully hard-going, it's not exactly page-turning stuff either. The problem is, the author seems very taken by the movements of the 1960s and when he tries to bridge the gap to make it relevant to cycling, it just seems a bit forced. Also, the more the book turns to politics, the more the author's own politics gets in the way. I don't mind an author having a point of view, but when it clouds the issues, that's a problem.

And this is the biggest problem I have with the book: when the author comes to deal with the cycling politics of the 1970s and later, he loses it big time. He pretty much gives 'Critical Mass' a free ride (no pun intended), painting them as free-spirit progressive anarchists and blithely ignoring the criticisms that many have regarding their activities. This same radically uncritical attitude is applied to bike paths - the author has his pro-bike path script and he's sticking to it with the fervour of a committed ideologue. But when it comes to Vehicular Cycling, he goes into full-fledged foaming-at-the-mouth attack dog mode. Now Vehicular Cycling (or VC) has its detractors, but in the end it is simply a method of operating a bicycle that is intended to keep cyclists both safe and legal. While some of its advocates have a slash and burn strategy in terms of how they interact with others (they are not the most easygoing bunch), I see no reason to get this riled up about it. Mr. Furness basically equates VC's advocates with the Ku Klux Klan, at one point calling VC 'racist' with little more argument than the fact that the League of American Wheelmen was once (a long long time before VC was ever adopted by the organization) a racist organization. He goes on to paint VC as a philosophy of middle-aged white elitist men. This is totally uncalled for and I basically stopped crediting the author as having anything serious to say at this point. Mr. Furness's apparent rage towards certain cyclist advocates prevents him from giving us any sort of evenhanded assessment of cycling politics during the last 40 years, which is a shame, since that is what the book is trying to be about.

While the book is not a complete loss (chapter 2 is not bad), I found the book mildly tedious, extremely doctrinaire, uneven and deeply politically biased. I urge prospective readers to avoid this one.

Kefrannan
This is an outstanding treatment of bicycles and their relationship to larger quality of life issues in the USA. The key idea s that of "automobility." The book is a powerful and tractable exposition, the only treatment of I know of that is not undertheorized with respect to its subject matter! (And I've read them all...)

His treatment is sociological and normative, not just descriptive and historical (assuming the latter is possible.) Apparently, this is confusing to folks. Building a solid case on a sandy foundation is always going to upset those, who, regardless of disciplinary pedigree, are only satisfied with unassailable assessments...but such is life.

Furness focuses on the *relationships* between bicycles, transportation, the built environment and the larger consumer culture (with its dominant "rugged individualist" psychology and economic "market ideology). He examines the role of the bicycle, both the role it has played and could play, in enhancing (or detracting from) the quality of life emergent among those relationships. In so doing, Furness critically helps point the way forward for bicycle advocacy, from an historically informed perspective on "automobility."

Contrary to the other reviewers, this book is not the least bit ideological. The claims of bias seem confused, even if predictable. Furness does demand critical inquiry, where third-party evidence is what matters, not the parroting of the received wisdom from various "stakeholders" in and around bicycle and transportation circles; and he assumes that ecological concerns should be primary in *any* historical or normative account of *any* technology in 2011; and he assumes that any "black box" discussion of the bicycle - as if the bicycle is ipso facto, an unimpeachable, cosmic good - is a malignant form of ideology all its own. (Which is sure to anger orthodox bicycle advocacy organizations.) These are certainly his assumed departure points. But they are methodological. Such assumptions don't undermine his thesis and discussion about the *politics of automobility* - they ground it. Every critique assumes a departure point. At least Furness' is evidentially, normatively and historically grounded. I would challenge anyone to indicate otherwise...

Furness's book will likely anger traditional bicycle advocates, especially those inclined to classically liberal political perspectives: again, his is not a reductionist treatment that isolates the bicycle in a "black box" as an unequivocal good.

Those who are interested in the decline of the quality of life in the USA; social and mechanical technology; distributed theories of learning and cognition; embodied aesthetics; transportation; the built environment; and social movements, will be fascinated and rewarded by this book. It is excellent precisely because it does not offer definitive answers, much less decontextual, ahistorical ones. It is useful and excellent precisely because so much of it is arguable!

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