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What A President Should Know: An Insider's View on How to Succeed in the Oval Office epub ebook

by Lawrence B. Lindsey,Marc Sumerlin

What A President Should Know: An Insider's View on How to Succeed in the Oval Office epub ebook

Author: Lawrence B. Lindsey,Marc Sumerlin
Category: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (January 3, 2008)
Pages: 256 pages
ISBN: 0742562220
ISBN13: 978-0742562226
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 110
Other formats: rtf doc mobi docx


Lawrence B. Lindsey was Assistant to the President for Economic Policy and Director of the National Economic Council at the White House (2001-2002). Marc Sumerlin is Managing Director and co-founder of The Lindsey Group

Lawrence B. From 1997 to 2001, he was a Resident Scholar and holder of the Arthur F. Burns Chair in Economics at the American Enterprise Institute. During late 1999 and throughout 2000 he served as then-Gov. George W. Bush's chief economic advisor for his presidential campaign. Marc Sumerlin is Managing Director and co-founder of The Lindsey Group. He previously served as Deputy Assistant to the President for Economic Policy and Deputy Director of the National Economic Council for Pres.

This book is for the next president of the United States, all the ting, and, most importantly .

This book is for the next president of the United States, all the ting, and, most importantly, political junkies who appreciate that these authors were Oval Office advisors and that they understand what it takes to get a new administration up-and-running. What are the likely issues he will encounter on the first day in the Oval Office? What does he do about the cost of the Iraq War? He'll get blamed if there's another terrorist attack, so what does he need to do that first day and the days and weeks to come to realistically and prudently prevent such an attack? How's the economy?

Электронная книга "What a President Should Know: An Insider's View on How to Succeed in the Oval Office", Lawrence B. Lindsey.

Электронная книга "What a President Should Know: An Insider's View on How to Succeed in the Oval Office", Lawrence B. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "What a President Should Know: An Insider's View on How to Succeed in the Oval Office" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

What a President Should Know book. Interesting tidbits about history. by Lawrence B Lindsey is the type of book that, if I owned a copy, I would read it all, a little at a time, over a period of time. Since it needs to go back to library, I am probably going to move it to my Did Not Finish list.

Lawrence B. Lindsey, Marc Sumerlin. The winner of the presidential election will need to get quickly up-to-speed on how to manage the government. What are the likely issues he will encounter on the first day in the Oval Office? What does he do about.

Personal Author: Lindsey, Lawrence. The winner of the presidential election will need to get quickly up-to-speed on how to manage the government

Personal Author: Lindsey, Lawrence. What are the likely issues he will encounter on the first day in the Oval Office? What does he do about the cost of the Iraq War? He'll get blamed if there's another terrorist attack, so what does he need to do that first day and the days and weeks to come to realistically and prudently prevent such an attack? How's the economy?

What a President Should Know.

What a President Should Know. But Most Learn Too Late : An Insider's View on How to Succeed in the Oval Office. by Lawrence B.

Personal Name: Lindsey, Lawrence. by von Manfried Dietrich, Oswald Loretz. ISBN: 3927120006 Author: Dietrich, Manfried.

The winner of the presidential election will need to get quickly up-to-speed on how to manage the government  . You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

Author: Lawrence B. Title: What a President Should Know: An Insider's View on How to Succeed in the Oval Office. No user reports were added yet. Be the first! Send report: This is a good book. No genres by users yet.

The winner of the presidential election will need to get quickly up-to-speed on how to manage the government. What are the likely issues he will encounter on the first day in the Oval Office? What does he do about the cost of the Iraq War? He'll get blamed if there's another terrorist attack, so what does he need to do that first day and the days and weeks to come to realistically and prudently prevent such an attack? How's the economy? What kind of policies can he now really propose based upon the present state of the economy and the tax-base that supports federal programs? He promised during the campaign to tackle big issues like healthcare, education, energy, immigration, international trade, and taxation. If he's going to hold himself to his own campaign rhetoric then he'd better surround himself with political savvy, fiscally astute advisers―like Lindsey and Sumerlin. This book is for the next president of the United States, all the policy-makers-in-waiting, and, most importantly, political junkies who appreciate that these authors were Oval Office advisors and that they understand what it takes to get a new administration up-and-running.
Reviews (5)
Purestone
I have read some of the other reviews and my take is this book was not written for my direct benefit but for that of an incoming President. We have now seen the terrible results of a president with no prior experience of any substance. Eighteen trillion dollars in debt and no plan to stop spending. I am familiar with the authors of this book and know the "substance" of their background experience. Economist. The book provides a description of the complexity of the issues at the table of an incoming president. Increasing debt only complicates the problem creating division and diversion from the issues.
The reason I enjoyed the read was it brings to the public the difficult task of being the leader of the free world, while still managing the USA. Social media makes it even more difficult to accomplish anything and then there is the political correctness crowd reducing everything to the lowest the common denominator.

Jwalextell
I loved this book. It helped me understand why some of the most complicated issues facing are nation (i.e. health care, education, taxes, terrorism), are so complicated and why many presidents don't have the political guts to get to the core of these issues. Lindsey does not make a list of people to condemn. He is favorable to Bush which is fine with me--(Bush hasn't been the sole source of all our troubles these last 8 years.)--but he doesn't set him up like a God either. I like this book better than other books of a political nature because it was not a smeer of current politicians. It was more like--'here's the big problems, here is why no one else has wanted to deal with them, here are some things you could do, but either way it's going to be rough on you'.

Rude
I tried going into this book with an open mind. The fact that I believe George Bush is the worst president of all time aside, Lindsey & Sumerlin's book is fairly evenhanded with a slant toward republicanism.

This book does not spend much time discussing the current admin but actually spends more time on previous administrations

Lindsey avoids referring to the current president's mistakes so comes off as an apologist by omission. Having said that, there were things that I learned in historical context of the workings of the White House, the economy and politics.

Don't expect an in depth discourse on decision making in the executive branch. It's more like, 'How to be the Prez 101'.

I would still recommend reading it, but get it at the library and spend your money on a different book or music instead.

Qwert
Lindsey's book is a great disappointment - was hoping for an erudite examination of major economic issues facing the U.S., and instead found sophomoric suggestions such as "Don't" go into war, because it damaged Lincoln, Wilson, FDR, LBJ, Nixon and Bush II politically, and their physical appearance and health, and "if you do go into war, have an exit strategy."

The government's response to 1929 was tax increases, tightened monetary policy, and increased tariffs. Therefore, per Lindsey, we should do the opposite today - even though Bush's last tax cuts were followed by continued decline in the economic status of most Americans, as well as the loss of millions of manufacturing jobs and a resulting negative impact on our security. (Nonetheless, without noting the key relevance, Lindsey also points out that Adam Smith believed free trade was not justified when it damaged national security. He seems to think that overvaluing the Chinese currency is the only problem - failing to realize that they have millions willing to work at 10% or so of American wages, thus severely limiting how far the yuan would rise. Further, raising the value of the yuan would decrease foreign investment in China (vs. Vietnam, etc.), lead to unrest due to job losses in China, and require exchange rate losses on the hundreds of billions of U.S. debt they already hold.

Health care, education, and energy are identified as major problems. Lindsey's analyses, however, are of no value. He sees health-care as trapped between increased rationing and an increased share of GNP (ignoring substantial opportunities for savings through a single-payer system and a strong focus on eliminating the nearly 50% spent on ineffectual/harmful treatments, per experts). After summarizing recent "achievements" in education (higher expenditures with little/nothing to show for it), he leaves the topic without any recommendation (How about maximizing parental and pupil involvement such as is done in Asia?). Next, he dances around both energy and environment policy without considering conservation.

As for Bush's tax cuts, Lindsey ignores the disparate impact issue and simply "proves" their effect by noting that the economy grew after their impact. That logic (assuming causation via correlation) has long been derided as of little/no value by researchers.

The only useful "takeaway" from this book is his pointing out that by the time a significant proposal gets to the Oval Office, the presenter (eg. from the National Security Council, National Economic Council, etc.) is greatly outnumbered by others without any detailed knowledge of the topic - mostly persuaders (lobbyists) and long-time loyalists (sycophants). Hardly a recipe for good policy-making.

Zan
I had high expectations for this book because of Lindsay's history in the White House. However, his depiction of what a future president should know was extremely boring and redundant. I would not recommend this book to anybody.

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