ePub 1926 kb. | Fb2 1614 kb. | DJVU: 1718 kb.
Politics, Social

Hobbes and the Law of Nature epub ebook

by Perez Zagorin

Hobbes and the Law of Nature epub ebook

Author: Perez Zagorin
Category: Philosophy
Language: English
Publisher: Princeton University Press; First Edition (1st printing) edition (December 6, 2009)
Pages: 192 pages
ISBN: 0691139806
ISBN13: 978-0691139807
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 188
Other formats: docx lit doc mobi


In this book, Professor Perez Zagorin makes the case that Hobbes had a natural law based moral . What a joy it was to read Perez Zagorin's Hobbes and the Law of Nature

In this book, Professor Perez Zagorin makes the case that Hobbes had a natural law based moral philosophy with the foundation being man's natural desire to survive and his natural desire to accept civil society as a means to survival. What a joy it was to read Perez Zagorin's Hobbes and the Law of Nature. For non-professional philosophers, such as myself, I cannot imagine a finer overview of the main themes of Hobbes' political philosophy. Among the many things that I like about this short text (128 pages) is that it is not a hatchet job.

In this book, Perez Zagorin argues that these two concepts are the twin foundations of the entire structure of Hobbes's moral and political thought. Zagorin clears up numerous misconceptions about Hobbes and his relation to earlier natural law thinkers, in particular Hugo Grotius, and he reasserts the often overlooked role of the Hobbesian law of nature as a moral standard from which even sovereign power is not immune. Princeton University Press, 16 нояб.

have any knowledge or awareness of the concept of the law of nature or natural law in its relation to morality, law, or politics

Home Browse Books Book details, Hobbes and the Law of Nature.

Home Browse Books Book details, Hobbes and the Law of Nature. Hobbes and the Law of Nature.

In this book, Perez Zagorin argues that these two concepts are the twin foundations of the entire structure of. . Preface ix Abbreviations xi Chapter 1: S ome Basic Hobbesian Concepts 1 The Law of Nature 5 Hobbes's Critique of the Natural Law Tradition 11 Natural Rights 20 Chapter 2: Enter the Law of Nature 30 Human Nature 32 The State of Nature or Man's Natural Condition 36 The Precepts of the Law of Nature 42 Natural Rights and the Creation.

Автор: Zagorin, Perez Название: Hobbes and the law of nature Издательство: Wiley . This book argues that these two concepts are the twin foundations of the entire structure of Hobbes& moral and political thought.

This book argues that these two concepts are the twin foundations of the entire structure of Hobbes& moral and political thought.

Princeton University Press (2009). Thomas Hobbes: The Eternal Law, the Eternal Word, and the Eternity of the Law of Nature. Similar books and articles. Natural law. Categories. Robert A. Greene - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (5):625-644. Pyrrhonism in the Political Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes. James J. Hamilton - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):217-247. How Rights Became Subjective.

Perez Zagorin was the Joseph C. Wilson Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Rochester. His books include Thucydides: An Introduction for the Common Reader and How the Idea of Religious Toleration Came to the West (both Princeton). Country of Publication. Philosophy & Psychology. Princeton University Press.

This is the first major work in English to explore at length the meaning, context, aims, and vital importance of Thomas Hobbes's concepts of the law of nature and the right of nature.

This is the first major work in English to explore at length the meaning, context, aims, and vital importance of Thomas Hobbes's concepts of the law of nature and the right of nature. Hobbes remains one of the most challenging and controversial of early modern philosophers, and debates persist about the interpretation of many of his ideas, particularly his views about natural law and natural right. In this book, Perez Zagorin argues that these two concepts are the twin foundations of the entire structure of Hobbes's moral and political thought.

Zagorin clears up numerous misconceptions about Hobbes and his relation to earlier natural law thinkers, in particular Hugo Grotius, and he reasserts the often overlooked role of the Hobbesian law of nature as a moral standard from which even sovereign power is not immune. Because Hobbes is commonly thought to be primarily a theorist of sovereignty, political absolutism, and unitary state power, the significance of his moral philosophy is often underestimated and widely assumed to depend entirely on individual self-interest. Zagorin reveals Hobbes's originality as a moral philosopher and his importance as a thinker who subverted and transformed the idea of natural law.

Hobbes and the Law of Nature is a major contribution to our understanding of Hobbes's moral, legal, and political philosophy, and a book rich in interpretive and critical insights into Hobbes's writing and thought.

Reviews (5)
Geny
This book is an absolute delight. Zagorin’s writing style is academic, but he discusses the sometimes confusing issues with a clarity that demonstrates a supreme command of the subject. In the process he clarifies Hobbes’ philosophy of the law of nature and dispels many misconceptions about the operation of these laws within the framework of the sovereign commonwealth. His discussion is not limited to Hobbes. He discusses and analyzes the evolution of natural rights and natural law from ancient times, through the Scholastic period, to Hobbes’ contemporaries. Zagorin accomplishes that very rare feat — making a dull subject exciting and engaging.

Zagorin presents an aspect of Hobbes’ work little discussed. The book explains how the laws of nature informed the philosophical debate before Hobbes, but how it defined not only his entire philosophical framework, but defined the political mind and struggles which would ensue for the centuries later and remains to this day.

The great conflict in the philosophy of law is between legal positivism and natural law. The tenets of legal positivism has been the justification of authoritarianism since the inception to the present day and finds its expression in the Unitary Theory of Presidential power. On the other end of the spectrum are the natural rights that belong to everyone which have inspired the United States Constitution, the Paris Commune, and the Enlightenment and the American, French and Russian Resolutions.

The convenient wisdom is that Hobbes is the champion for the Leviathan, the absolute sovereign to whom its subjects have relinquished their rights and to whom obedience is given. Zagorin clarifies Hobbes’ theoretical system to show that he was the champion of natural laws as well, perhaps even more so. While the citizenry relinquishes their natural rights to the sovereign to escape the chaos of the state of nature, the scope of the sovereign’s power is limited by the scope of this relinquishment. The sovereign’s actions are illegitimate when he acts in excess to those limits. This should give all dictators pause.

There are other books that discuss Hobbes’ philosophy of natural law and natural rights. The Peripatetic Reader doubts whether there are any better explanations of this topic or a better reading experience.

GEL
"Why does everyone have to write about Hocke and Lobbes, Hocke and Lobbes?," grumbled an old professor of mine. Why indeed?

Hobbes and Locke are the two key seventeenth-century writers in the Anglo-American tradition--never neglected, but often misrepresented. Of the two, Hobbes arguably is the more original thinker and more often misunderstood. Rather than a two-dimensional figure, notable for first clearly articulating a "theory of sovereignty" and who brilliantly re-imagined the contract by which men move from an apolitical state to settled government, or a straw man to be attacked by the latest clever political philosopher, Zagorin has given us an "historical-philosophical essay"(2) that rightly puts Hobbes's moral philosophy and his concern with natural law at the heart of his project.

Zagorin blazes his own path through the almost overwhelming jungle of Hobbes scholarship, and emerges with a slender, almost terse volume that should put to rest the myth of an "amoral" or "atheist" Hobbes who was unconcerned with how we ought to live, and puts in its place a thinker who had thought long and hard about why the benefits of a settled political regime were worth the high price that he thought we needed to pay to realize it.

This is the last work of a distinguished historian, argued with as much passion and vigor as his first writings on seventeen-century political thought published over fifty years ago, and is well worth reading.
DK

Vrion
very good

ACOS
Thomas Hobbes is known almost exclusively for his views on the social contract and the creation of an almost absolute government, as described in his famous tome, Leviathan. What he is not known for is his moral philosophy. In this book, Professor Perez Zagorin makes the case that Hobbes had a natural law based moral philosophy with the foundation being man's natural desire to survive and his natural desire to accept civil society as a means to survival. There is a lot to be mined here and Zagorin does a great job of presenting opposing viewpoint to his own. There is an interesting discussion and description of Hobbes' views on heresy, and the almost standard review of whether or nor Hobbes as a theist. This book gives Hobbes a more rounded look, one that he deserves as being more than the misunderstood proponent of despotic governments.

Nejind
What a joy it was to read Perez Zagorin's Hobbes and the Law of Nature. For non-professional philosophers, such as myself, I cannot imagine a finer overview of the main themes of Hobbes' political philosophy. Among the many things that I like about this short text (128 pages) is that it is not a hatchet job. Unlike others, he does not tranform Hobbes into a "straw man" so that he can pillory him. On the contrary, Zagorin, while alert to where Hobbes's thought bears tough scrutiny, shows Hobbes at his best. And even more than that, he shows how everything that Hobbes wrote flows from his original presuppositions about human nature. This is a fun, fascinating, and engaging book. Enjoy it!

2016-2020 © www.hotellemcasadeicervia.it
All rights reserved