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Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity: From Static to Genetic Phenomenology (Contemporary Studies in Philosophy and the Human Sciences) epub ebook

by Janet Donohoe

Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity: From Static to Genetic Phenomenology (Contemporary Studies in Philosophy and the Human Sciences) epub ebook

Author: Janet Donohoe
Category: Philosophy
Language: English
Publisher: Humanity Books (July 5, 2004)
Pages: 197 pages
ISBN: 159102210X
ISBN13: 978-1591022107
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 141
Other formats: mobi lrf mbr azw


It is a valuable and much welcomed contribution to studies in contemporary phenomenology and Husserl .

It is a valuable and much welcomed contribution to studies in contemporary phenomenology and Husserl scholarship. This book provides a compelling look at the importance of Husserl's methodological shift from his original, purely "static" approach to his later "genetic" approach to the analysis of consciousness. This much-needed synthesis of Husserl's methodology will be of interest to Husserl scholars, phenomenologists, and philosophers from both Continental and analytic schools.

Janet Donohoe shows that between 1913 and 1921 Husserl progressed in his thinking from a constitutive analysis of how something is experienced, which focused primarily on the This book provides a compelling look at the importance of Husserl’s methodological shift from his original.

Janet Donohoe shows that between 1913 and 1921 Husserl progressed in his thinking from a constitutive analysis of how something is experienced, which focused primarily on the This book provides a compelling look at the importance of Husserl’s methodological shift from his original, purely "static" approach to his later "genetic" approach to the analysis of consciousness.

Husserl: Genetic Phenomenology in Continental Philosophy. The question arises because Husserl approaches volitional consciousness in his static and his genetic phenomenology rather differently.

Humanity Books (2004). Husserl: Genetic Phenomenology in Continental Philosophy. Husserl: Horizonality in Continental Philosophy.

The Other Husserl: The Horizons of Transcendental Phenomenology (pp. 165–220). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

December 2006, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 249–258 Cite as. Donohoe, Janet, Husserl on ethics and intersubjectivity: from static to genetic phenomenology. Authors and affiliations. The Other Husserl: The Horizons of Transcendental Phenomenology (pp. Mensch, J. R. (2001). In Postfoundational Phenomenology: Husserlian Reflections on Presence and Embodiment (pp. 185–241).

Janet Donohoe is a professor of philosophy in the Department of English and Philosophy at the University of West Georgia.

In Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity, Janet Donohoe offers a compelling look into Husserl’s shift from a "static" to a "genetic" approach in his analysis of consciousness. Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity: From Static and Genetic Phenomenology. Janet Donohoe is a professor of philosophy in the Department of English and Philosophy at the University of West Georgia. 1: On the Distinction Between Static and Genetic Phenomenologies. 2: On Time Consciousness and Its Relationship to Intersubjectivity.

In Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity, Janet Donohoe offers a compelling look into Husserl’s shift from a static to a genetic approach in his analysis of consciousness. Engaging critics from contemporary analytic schools to third-generation phenomenologists, Donohoe shows that they often do not do justice to the breadth of Husserl’s thoughts.

This book provides a compelling look at the importance of Husserl's methodological shift from his original, purely "static" approach to his later "genetic" approach to the analysis of consciousness.

From Static and Genetic Phenomenology. series New Studies in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics. In separate chapters Donohoe elucidates the relevance of Husserl’s later genetic phenomenology to his work on time consciousness, intersubjectivity, and ethical issues.

KEYWORDS: Kunstlehre; Phenomenology; Husserl; Gadamer; Phrónesis; Sensus Communis; Applied Phenomenology. JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Philosophy, Vo. N., May 29, 2013. Aristotle’s concept of phrónesis will be also regarded as a kind of natural as if, and considered as Kunstlehre.

Phenomenology (from Greek phainómenon "that which appears" and lógos "study") is the philosophical study of the structures of experience and consciousness. As a philosophical movement it was founded in the early years of the 20th. As a philosophical movement it was founded in the early years of the 20th century by Edmund Husserl and was later expanded upon by a circle of his followers at the universities of Göttingen and Munich in Germany. It then spread to France, the United States, and elsewhere, often in contexts far removed from Husserl's early work.

This book provides a compelling look at the importance of Husserl’s methodological shift from his original, purely "static" approach to his later "genetic" approach to the analysis of consciousness. Janet Donohoe shows that between 1913 and 1921 Husserl progressed in his thinking from a constitutive analysis of how something is experienced, which focused primarily on the general structure of consciousness as an abstract unity, to an investigation into the origins of the subject as a unique individual interacting with and growing within the surrounding environment. Whereas his earlier work presents the ego as already fully evolved and thus leaves much about human experience unaccounted for, Husserl’s later writings demonstrate an appreciation for the development of the ego and for questions of history, culture, intersubjectivity, and ethics.Engaging critics from contemporary analytic schools to adherents of critical theory and deconstruction, to second and third generation phenomenologists, Donohoe shows that they often do not do justice to the breadth of Husserl’s thought. In separate chapters, she elucidates the relevance of Husserl’s later genetic phenomenology to his work on time - consciousness, intersubjectivity, and ethical issues such as the categorical imperative, the relationship of the individual to the community, and tradition and self-responsibility.This much-needed synthesis of Husserl’s methodology will be of interest to Husserl scholars, phenomenologists, and philosophers from both Continental and analytic schools.
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