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Critical Entertainments: Music Old and New epub ebook

by Charles Rosen

Critical Entertainments: Music Old and New epub ebook

Author: Charles Rosen
Category: Music
Language: English
Publisher: Harvard University Press; 1st edition (April 28, 2000)
Pages: 336 pages
ISBN: 0674177304
ISBN13: 978-0674177307
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 208
Other formats: mobi azw mbr rtf


Critical Entertainments book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Critical Entertainments: Music Old and New as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Critical Entertainments book.

Rosen, Charles, 1927-2012. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Article in Music and Letters 82(2):282-287 · May 2001 with 6 Reads. This chapter explores how the Country Music Association and the Country Music Foundation have shaped the telling of country music history. How we measure 'reads'. It traces the development of the Foundation and the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum from the mid-1960s to the present, arguing that although the Foundation sought to become a traditional academic institution in its early years, it was ultimately.

Critical Entertainments is that rare combination, of both the critical and the entertaining-as one would expect from a performer

Critical Entertainments is that rare combination, of both the critical and the entertaining-as one would expect from a performer. Anthony Gritten "Music and Letters ". Synopsis. This book brings together many of the essays that have established him as one of the most influential and eloquent voices in the field of music in our time.

Hardcover Book, 336 pages. Critical Entertainments brings together many of the essays that have established him as one of the most influential and eloquent voices in the field of music in our time. These essays cover a broad range of musical forms, historical periods, and issues - from Bach through Brahms to Carter and Schoenberg, from contrapuntal keyboard music to opera, from performance practices to music history as a discipline.

Charles Rosen is that exciting college professor from whom you felt honored to earn a B-plus, and his new anthology is. .

Charles Rosen is that exciting college professor from whom you felt honored to earn a B-plus, and his new anthology is bracing. This book brings together many of the essays that have established him as one of the most influential and eloquent voices in th filed of music in our time.

A consummate pianist who embraces Beethoven and.

It covers a variety of topics, including Oliver Strunk; the work of various composers; the status of contemporary music, and the "New Musicology". Rosen also published in other areas of the humanities: Romanticism and Realism: The Mythology of Nineteenth-Century Art, and Romantic Poets, Critics, and Other Madmen. Aspects of Rosen's writing

Charles Rosen is renowned as a pianist, scholar, and lecturer, and as a writer in the fields of music, art, literature .

Charles Rosen is renowned as a pianist, scholar, and lecturer, and as a writer in the fields of music, art, literature, and intellectual history. York in 1927 and left The Juilliard School of Music at the age of eleven to study piano with Moritz Rosenthal, a pupil of Liszt. Recent publications include a collection of essays under the title ‘Critical Entertainments’ published by Harvard University Press, ‘Beethoven’s Piano Sonatas – A Short Companion’ published by Yale University Press (2001), and ‘Piano Notes, The Hidden World of the Pianist’ published by Allen Lane (2003).

An extraordinarily gifted musician and writer, Charles Rosen is a peerless commentator on the history and performance of music. Critical Entertainments brings together many of the essays that have established him as one of the most influential and eloquent voices in the field of music in our time.

These essays cover a broad range of musical forms, historical periods, and issues--from Bach through Brahms to Carter and Schoenberg, from contrapuntal keyboard music to opera, from performance practices to music history as a discipline. They revisit Rosen's favorite subjects and pursue some less familiar paths. They court controversy (with strong opinions about performance on historical instruments, the so-called New Musicology, and the alleged "death" of classical music) and offer enlightenment on subjects as diverse as music dictionaries and the aesthetics of stage fright. All are unified by Rosen's abiding concerns and incomparable style. In sum, Critical Entertainments is a treasury of the vast learning, wit, and insight that we have come to expect from this remarkable writer. It will delight all music lovers.

Reviews (4)
MisterQweene
Charles Rosen is a writer of staggering intellect. I have most of his books. He is also a very good pianist. He is also an intellectual whose interests go beyond the realm of classical music...

Beazekelv
This is good, ripe stuff. Very interesting discussions of music old and new. I suppose it helps to be musically literate when reading the book but I'm not and I really enjoyed it.

Keath
Charles Rosen is a leading performer of the most difficult works of the 20th century avant-garde on piano (Elliot Carter, Anton Webern), as well as the classical repertory (Beethoven, Chopin), so he brings unique insight to his scholarship and writing on music. I enjoyed several of these essays tremendously, including "Radical, Conventional Mozart," and the piece on the problems with performing Carter's "Double Concerto" for piano and harpsichord.

The essay "The Irrelevance of Serious Music," though, is not only brilliant, but should be widely popularized. The key is that Rosen writes from the perspective of the musician! He emphasizes that musicians will play music they are inspired by, even if only for one another. He presents many examples of music and musicians now established in the repertory that were initially rejected as "too difficult."

But he also argues that an attempt to appeal to the lowest common denominator will not satisfy the serious listeners either -- they want to be challenged, at least up to a point. The reductio ad absurdum of commercialism, of course, is to eliminate "classical" music altogether, as the market is too small for a huge corporation to justify. (Rosen had a recording cancelled by Sony when he wrote a portion of this essay in the NYT criticizing the head of Sony for his obtuse commercialism.)

Rosen concludes that "[a] work that ten people love passionately is more important than one that ten thousand do not mind hearing." Rosen provides support for my contention that books such as Libbey's "NPR Guide" do the public a disservice by excluding the leaders of the late 20th century avant-garde, including instead works that continue in the Romantic tradition.

In Rosen's essay on Beethoven, he critiques a book by a sociologist. While I don't disagree with much here, I do think Rosen mainly takes on a strawman version of sociology. In the introduction he criticizes "[s]ociologists who believe that the history of music can be entirely elucidated by its social functions and the classes that support it without any reference to the music itself..."

What I think Rosen misses is that the very process he describes so eloquently, the process of musicians shaping the reception of advanced works, is itself sociological! Becker's Art Worlds is a basic reference here, but the best book elaborating how music acquires meaning is Peter J. Martin's Sounds and Society.

Rosen is a graceful and compelling writer, and I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys serious music!

(verified library loan)

Gathris
To give a worthy review of this wonderful book would be to write 18 reviews, because every chapter deals with a different subject. There is something here for anyone and everyone who loves Classical music, including professional musicians, music scholars, and the general public. As always with this author, his impeccable music scholarship and insights are coupled with a clear prose style and commentary that is completely accessible to anyone. Topics range the full gamut of musical eras from Gregorian Chant through Baroque, Classical, Romantic, to Contemporary. The informative and aesthetically chosen chapter titles "speak for themselves": The Aesthetics of Stage Fright; The Discipline of Philology: Oliver Strunk; Keyboard Music of Bach and Handel; The Rediscovering of Haydn; Describing Mozart; Beaumarchais; Inventor of Modern Opera; Radical, Conventional Mozart; Beethoven's Career; Brahms: Influence, Plagiarism, and Inspiration; Brahms the Subversive; Brahms: Classicism and the Inspiration of Awkwardness; The Benefits of Authenticity; Dictionaries: the Old Harvard; Dictionaries: The New Grove's; The New Musicology; Schoenberg: The Possibilities of Disquiet; The Performance of Contemporary Music: Carter's Double Concerto; The Irrelevance of Serious Music. Each chapter in this book is filled with new and fascinating information that, although usually discussing music of the past, is also relevant to the 21st Century in which we now live. Charles Rosen's unique personal insights come from a life time of experience both performing and studying music that is exceptional in contemporary times. I found discussions of the careers and/or music of Bach, Handel, Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, Schoenberg, and Carter very unique. The chapter concerning Brahms use of specific passages in pieces by Chopin and Beethoven as models for his own music was one of my favorites. The books concludes with a chapter about the state of serious music today relative to the negative influence shared by many directors of the record industry in their pursuit of fast profits without any concern for the future. I can't say enough about this wonderful book. Most highly recommended!

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