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Houston's Forgotten Heritage: Landscape, Houses, Interiors, 1824-1914 (Sara and John Lindsey Series in the Arts and Humanities) epub ebook

by Junior League of Houston,Barrie M. Scardino,Sadie Gwin Blackburn,Katherine S. Howe,Dorothy Knox Howe Houghton

Houston's Forgotten Heritage: Landscape, Houses, Interiors, 1824-1914 (Sara and John Lindsey Series in the Arts and Humanities) epub ebook

Author: Junior League of Houston,Barrie M. Scardino,Sadie Gwin Blackburn,Katherine S. Howe,Dorothy Knox Howe Houghton
Category: Architecture
Language: English
Publisher: Texas A & M Univ Pr; Reprint edition (September 1, 1998)
Pages: 387 pages
ISBN: 0890968519
ISBN13: 978-0890968512
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 999
Other formats: docx lit docx lrf


DOROTHY KNOX HOWE HOUSTON is a direct descendant of Jane .

DOROTHY KNOX HOWE HOUSTON is a direct descendant of Jane Birdsall and John Richardson Harris, the family for whom Harris County is named. She is a graduate of Bryn Mawr College and holds a Master's degree from the University of Texas at Austin. She is a member of the Junior League of Houston and is active in numerous other civic and cultural group. She is also the author of The Houston Club and its City. SADIE GWIN BLACKBURN is a direct descendant of Harvey Allen and holds two degrees from Rice University. KATHERINE S. HOWE is director of the Rienzi and Dora Maar House at Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Houston’s Forgotten Heritage stands out because of its integration of architecture, landscape, social history, and interior design, along with the authors’ ability to place Houston within the broader context of American history. Sara and John Lindsey Series in the Arts and Humanities. Texas A&M University Press.

Houston's Forgotten Heritage book. Start by marking Houston's Forgotten Heritage: Landscape, Houses, Interiors, 1824-1914 as Want to Read

Houston's Forgotten Heritage book. Start by marking Houston's Forgotten Heritage: Landscape, Houses, Interiors, 1824-1914 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Houston’s Forgotten Heritage stands out because of its integration of architecture, landscape . About the Author: DOROTHY KNOX HOWE HOUSTON is a direct descendant of Jane Birdsall and John Richardson Harris, the family for whom Harris County is named.

Houston's Forgotten Heritage by Barrie M. Scardino, Sadie Gwin Blackburn, Katherine S. Howe .

Landscape, Houses, Interiors, 1824-1914 (Sara and John Lindsey Series in the Arts and Humanities, No 2). by Barrie M. Howe, Dorothy Knox Howe Houghton. Published September 1998 by Texas A&M University Press.

Find nearly any book by Katherine S. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Junior League Of Houston, Barrie M. ISBN 9780890968512 (978-0-89096-851-2) Softcover, Texas A & M Univ Pr, 1998.

Exquisite Corpse Booksellers. 17 July 2016 ·. Those of us who have lived in Houston for awhile continue to be amazed at how well done the development of the parks around Buffalo Bayou is and how many people are now enjoying its natural beauty. At least the portion around Allen Parkway.

Houston's Hermann Park. Alice (Barrie) M. Scardino Bradley Author Doreen Stoller Author of afterword, colophon, etc. Sara and John Lindsey Series in the Arts and Humanities (Series). (2013).

Author and historian Barrie Scardino Bradley sets Hermann Park in both a local and a national context as this grand park celebrates its centennial at the culmination of a remarkable twenty-year rejuvenation. As Bradley shows, Houston’s development as a major American city may be traced in the outlines of the park’s history. During the early nineteenth century, Houston leaders were most interested in commercial development and connecting the city via water and rail to markets beyond its immediate area.

This ambitious book, originally published by Rice University Press in 1991, describes Houston home life and culture from the settlement of Houston to World War I, when rapid economic development spelled demolition for many notable nineteenth-century public buildings.Sadie Gwin Blackburn discusses landscape and horticulture, from the early plantations and the farms of German immigrants in Harris County to the residential gardens of early twentieth-century Houston. Barrie M. Scardino traces the development of domestic architecture from the log cabins built along the bayous in the 1820s to the grand Neville house built at 11 Courtlandt Place.Katherine S. Howe focuses on the evolution of home interiors, describing how four-poster beds were used to support mosquito netting and likely had mattresses filled with Spanish moss. Dorothy Knox Howe Houghton addresses domestic life and its influence on the social and cultural fabric of the city, describing how schools, religious assemblies, and even businesses evolved from the home.
Reviews (6)
Obong
This is a wonderfully researched and portrayed vision into the City of Houston's short but illustrious past. It is highly recommended reading for all native Houstonians, as well as those who have arrived since birth but now call Houston home. Those who find themselves enthralled in history will likewise enjoy the wealth of information and photographs addressing the intricacies of Houston's development and growth. Ronald Wardell

Lynnak
Good read

EROROHALO
This is exactly the book I was looking for about the history of many of Houston's buildings and homes in its early days, whether they still exist or not.

Bulace
I bought this as a gift for a friend who is an avid gardener. I wanted the Jr. League garden book but discovered it was not available. I substituted for this one, and she has said it was a beautiful book and she loved it.

Nawenadet
Received the book in the promised condition and in the promised amount of time. Well done!

Vispel
The authors and contributors to this book worked deep in the fine details of Houston's past. So much of it has been lost to the ages, but with Houston's Forgotten Heritage, it almost comes back to life through the fine photographs of the opulent homes and even the log cabins. It is a joy to show this book to many of my "old-timer" neighbors, who remember a building here and there, and even the old fixtures, appliances, and ways of life. We should all be grateful to the authors of this book for reminding us of our glorious past.

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