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Downsizing Prisons: How to Reduce Crime and End Mass Incarceration epub ebook

by Michael Jacobson

Downsizing Prisons: How to Reduce Crime and End Mass Incarceration epub ebook

Author: Michael Jacobson
Category: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: NYU Press (September 1, 2006)
Pages: 292 pages
ISBN: 0814742912
ISBN13: 978-0814742914
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 397
Other formats: mobi txt doc lrf


Michael Jacobson's excellent book combines the hands-on experience of a seasoned policy practitioner with a. .In Downsizing Prisons, he convincingly argues that mass incarceration will not, as many have claimed, reduce crime nor create more public safety.

Downsizing Prisonsis an excellent, well-documented, and well-referenced case study. Simply put, throwing away the key is not the answer.

Choice"Downsizing Prisons explains not only why current incarceration . He also demonstrates that this expansion has done nothing to reduce crime.

He also demonstrates that this expansion has done nothing to reduce crime.

Thinking About Crime Sense and Sensibility in American Penal Culture New York: Oxford Univ. Women's Lives, Men's Laws.

Downsizing Prisons offers an innovative approach to reducing the strain on America’s overcrowded prisons: namely, by fixing the dysfunctional parole systems in states around the country. Jacobson’s book comes at exactly the right time. Policy wonks, journalists, elected officials and students of criminal justice will find the arguments and data in this book worth grappling with. Downsizing Prisons is an excellent, well-documented, and well-referenced case study. Jacobson is a seasoned policy practitioner who understands the fit of partisan, policy,.

Downsizing Prisons book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Downsizing Prisons: How to Reduce Crime and End Mass Incarceration as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

book by Michael Jacobson. The increased use of mandatory minimum sentences, three-strikes legislation, and the vastly increased use of technical parole violations are identified as the major contributors to these increases.

Download books for free

Download books for free. After overseeing the largest city jail system in the country, Michael Jacobson knows first-hand the inner workings of the corrections system.

In Downsizing Prisons, he convincingly argues that mass incarceration will not, as many have claimed, reduce crime nor . Over two million people are incarcerated in America’s prisons and jails, eight times as many since 1975

In Downsizing Prisons, he convincingly argues that mass incarceration will not, as many have claimed, reduce crime nor create more public safety. Over two million people are incarcerated in America’s prisons and jails, eight times as many since 1975. Mandatory minimum sentencing, parole agencies intent on sending people back to prison, three-strike laws, for-profit prisons, and other changes in the legal system have contributed to this spectacular rise of the general prison population.

Over two million people are incarcerated in America’s prisons and jails, eight times as many since 1975

Over two million people are incarcerated in America’s prisons and jails, eight times as many since 1975.

Michael Jacobson, recent President and Director of the Vera Institute of Justice, offered his . In addition, he is the author of Downsizing Prisons: How to Reduce Crime and End Mass Incarceration (New York University Press 2005).

Michael Jacobson, recent President and Director of the Vera Institute of Justice, offered his views on the cost and efficiency of Mass Incarceration at St. He is the Chair of the New York City Criminal Justice Agency.

Over two million people are incarcerated in America’s prisons and jails, eight times as many since 1975. Mandatory minimum sentencing, parole agencies intent on sending people back to prison, three-strike laws, for-profit prisons, and other changes in the legal system have contributed to this spectacular rise of the general prison population.

After overseeing the largest city jail system in the country, Michael Jacobson knows first-hand the inner workings of the corrections system. In Downsizing Prisons, he convincingly argues that mass incarceration will not, as many have claimed, reduce crime nor create more public safety. Simply put, throwing away the key is not the answer.

Reviews (7)
Arlana
For hundreds of years, blacks and minorities have been living racial inequalities from the slavery era, to Jim Crow laws, and finally the mass incarceration. In less than three decades, we managed to imprison more than 1.3 million, mostly blacks and Latinos, the highest percentage of prison population in the entire world. Many scholars and civil rights advocates suggested so many unrealistic solutions, but very few had the ability or the courage to provide any practical or realistic recommendations. However, Michael Jacobson's Downsizing Prisons is considered one of the few scholars that identified the problem as well as the solution. After running the largest jail system in New York City, Jacobson noted that the current prison system is producing racial inequalities, and swallowing billions of dollars from state budgets, that should be directed to improve the standard of living for millions of impoverished families and communities. Most importantly, he argues mass incarceration negatively impacts blacks and racial minorities, and does not reduce crime.
In the first part of the book, Jacobson demonstrated that, during the past fifteen years, he Criminal Justice System has been affected by political movements such as "Tough on Crime" the "War on Drugs" and other such slogans that seduced public opinion in favor of harsh penalties. He added that politicians use high profile crimes such as the 12-year-old Polly Klaas incident, which resulted in the three-strike law of California, to shrewdly gain public support. To illustrate the correlation between mass incarceration and the surge in corrections numbers, Jacobson, used the Department of Justice reports to prove his argument. He indicated that, today, the US imprisons (702 per 100,000), more than Russia (628 per 100,000). Furthermore, the incarceration rate for whites is (450 per 100,000), blacks (1176 per 100,000) and Hispanics (3437 per 100,000). Financially, the "prison business employs 747,000 people and involves over $37 billion in expenditures."
In the last part of his book, Jacobson offered several suggestions for reform. In California, for instance, he suggested that legislators put a "cap" on the length of time that technical parole violators stay in prison which could save the state "up to $190 million--could then be partially reinvested in drug treatment and employment training, with the rest freed up for non-corrections programs." Likewise, he argues that, if California sent fewer technical parole violators back to prison immediately, `the state could save up to $750 million." Portions of this savings could be reinvested in community-based programs. To be more specific, he suggested the correction system must provide efficient drug treatment programs for nonviolent criminals, and decrease punishments for technical parole violations which account for the majority of prison re-entries, as opposed to the commission of new crimes.
In what he referred to as "Success Stories," Jacobson argued that the issue of probation could be resolved by examining the case studies of California, Connecticut and Louisiana. All three are unique, but have similar problems. Each of these states has problems with large numbers of supervised parole and probation violators, they all suffer fiscal distress, and at the same time they are different in size, geography and politics. To achieve success: 1) Reform must be a homegrown idea. 2) Strategies must confront and surmount unique local obstacles to reform. 3) Some obstacles to reform can become part of the solution. 4) Whenever and wherever it is possible, labor reductions should occur through attrition and states should limit layoffs. 5) Private prison contracts should be reduced, which will result in immediate budget savings. 6) Savings must be reflected in the budget, and the savings should be redirected toward helping prisoners' reenter society.
At the end of the book, he argues that politicians should get together and approve the "The Second Chance Act" which proposes lifting the barriers on government aid programs such as finical aid, federal housing, welfare benefits and more funds for job training and rehabilitations to felons especially for violent criminals. One of the reasons this book is considered a landmark in the history of criminology is Jacobson's simple and convincing argument that mass incarceration does more harm than good, and now is the time for prison reform. Mass incarceration has resulted in high recidivism rates, unsafe communities and a waste of tax payer's money. However, Jacobson did note what impact mass incarceration has had on the African American community, but work still needs to be done in this area, particularly as the Affordable Heath Care Act becomes available.

Cetnan
Thank you!

Zamo
Once I ordered the book i recieved it in a few days and all I requested was regular mail. I would def. order from here again.

Goltigor
Jacobson was a budget director for New York City who then became the head of probation and later the head of corrections. He thus has considerable experience with the costs of incarceration and how those costs impact the rest of the government's budgets.

In this book he reviews the tremendous rate of increase of incarceration over the last three decades and the costs attendant to this policy. The increased use of mandatory minimum sentences, three-strikes legislation, and the vastly increased use of technical parole violations are identified as the major contributors to these increases. He then reviews how ineffective this has been in reducing crime. Then he makes the case for reducing the rate of incarceration.

His thesis is that for lower grade cases (property crimes; drug crimes; etc.), lengthy prison sentences are both ineffective and fiscally wasteful. He would divert significant resources from this incarceration to (a) more treatment in lieu of custody and (b) other social programs which are also fiscally strapped.

The budget crunch faced by states in recent years he believes provide an opportunity for changes: states simply cannot afford their prisons. Even Louisiana and Mississippi have recently passed legislation which reduce some prison terms.

The book seems to be generally aimed at polilcy-level people. It describes the sorts of legislation that would be necessary, delineates some of the general political forces which are at work and which must be met ('tough-on-crime' attitudes; the prison guards unions; private prison corporations mainly). The book makes a persuasive case in fiscal terms and even on effectiveness (though his claims that we know which programs work and which don't are supported by citations of work and are not entirely convincing).

I was very glad to see a book like this become generally available and hope it gets a wide readership. This society clearly needs to deal with the issue, as we incarcerate people at a rate higher than any other nation in the world. Hopefullyl the book will help initiate and further the debate on the issue.

But it is not a book for general readership. He assumes that if costs can be cut and there is little change in public safety, then there can be little reason to not adopt the suggestions, that only politics is in the way. He makes no moral case against excessive incarceration. This omission means that this is not the book to convince the public, though it certainly should be given due consideration by the general public and policy makers.

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