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Roman Social Relations, 50 B.C. to A.D. 284 epub ebook

by Ramsay MacMullen

Roman Social Relations, 50 B.C. to A.D. 284 epub ebook

Author: Ramsay MacMullen
Category: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Yale University Press; 1st edition (1974)
Pages: 212 pages
ISBN: 0300027028
ISBN13: 978-0300027020
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 114
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Roman Social Relations, . I recommend this book for non specialists.

MacMullen, Ramsay, 1928-. Yale University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on July 7, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

The aim of author Ramsay MacMullen, in ROMAN SOCIAL RELATIONS: 50 BC TO AD 284, is to get at the feelings that governed the behavior of the broad social groups or conditions at that time. This purpose requires direct quotations so that people may be heard as often as possible speaking in their own words; they mention prejudice, servility, isolation, pride, shame, friendship, indifference, contempt, loyalty, despair, or exclusiveness.

Roman Social Relations, 50 B. C to A. D. 284. by Ramsay MacMullen. A perceptive and sensitive interpreter, he has drawn widely upon the scattered and unorganized evidence about the poorer classes, rural and urban, in much of the Roman Empire, and presents a fresh picture of their conditions, attitudes and aims.

This book provides a good overview of Roman social relations, and would pair well with The Oxford Handbook of.Ramsay MacMullen is an Emeritus Professor of history at Yale University, where he taught from 1967 to his retirement in 1993 as Dunham Professor of History and Classics.

This book provides a good overview of Roman social relations, and would pair well with The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World (edt. Michael Peachin) and Roman Social History: A Sourcebook (by Tim Parken and Arthur Pomeroy) for giving a deeper look into the topic. His scholarly interests are in the social history of Rome and the replacement of paganism by Christianity. Books by Ramsay MacMullen.

Are you sure you want to remove Roman social relations, 50 .

Roman social relations, 50 . Are you sure you want to remove Roman social relations, 50 .

Ramsay MacMullen is the recipient of a lifetime Award for Scholarly Distinction from the American Historical Association (awarded Jan. 5, 2001). The citation begins, ?Ramsay MacMullen is the greatest historian of the Roman Empire alive today. the social relations between different groups within the Empire over a period of more than three centuries.

Roman Social Relations: 50 . 284 New Haven: Yale University Press, 1974. Pp. ix + 212. ISBN 0300027028. Excluding family relations and race relations, MacMullen focuses on the character of and connections between rural and urban societies, highlighting their respective attitudes, economies, class structures, property distribution, and group dynamics. It is a sweeping study, and in less capable hands it would surely constitute egregious overreaching. Yet, having explored these subjects in great detail over the span of his career, MacMullen is a sure guide whose broad expertise allows him to paint broad strokes without obscuring the facts. RAMSAY MacMULLEN. Published by: Yale University Press. Robert S. Broughton"Ramsay MacMullen's work is always provocative and illuminating.

Specialist or no. his fine book represents for us what we may legitimately know of ancient society. Journal of Social History Ramsay MacMullen is the author of Paganism in the Roman Empire and Roman Government’s Response to Crisis, . 235-337, among other works.

“In this interesting and suggestive book, Professor MacMullen views anew an important and rather neglected aspect of Roman social relations. A perceptive and sensitive interpreter, he has drawn widely upon the scattered and unorganized evidence about the poorer classes, rural and urban, in much of the Roman Empire, and presents a fresh picture of their conditions, attitudes and aims.”―T. Robert S. Broughton“Ramsay MacMullen’s work is always provocative and illuminating. This book is no exception…Through good writing, clear presentation, and outstanding common-sense judgment the author has given us chapters to be read with pleasure by a large audience. Specialist or not…This fine book represents for us what we may legitimately know of ancient society.”―American Historical Review“Much of the evidence which MacMullen uses in his narrative is illuminating, much of the analysis and argument lucid and compelling….Roman Social Relations is an interesting and lively book [that] should certainly be read by anyone interested in the social history of the ancient world.”―Journal of Social HistoryRamsay MacMullen is the author of Paganism in the Roman Empire and Roman Government’s Response to Crisis, A.D. 235-337, among other works. He is Dunham Professor of History and Classics at Yale University and is currently president of the Association of Ancient Historians.
Reviews (2)
Abandoned Electrical
Not just for scholars...

I was referred to this book by the bibliography of History of Private Life vol. I. This is really more of a short (120pp.) essay on the title subject then a full treatment of the topic. As a non-specialist, I found quality to be appealing.

MacMullen sketches out a thumbnail portrait of Roman society during the republic. It is not a complex picture. The wealthy comprised one ten thousandth of one percent of the entire population, but they controlled almost all of the wealth. Below them were their often wealthy slaves and on the bottom were the "free romans".

Life in Roman times was nasty, brutish and filled with oft-violent conflict. In fact, the Pax Romana was anything but "pax". MacMullen's portrait of Roman life (at least in the rural areas) sounds like something a social Darwinist writing in the 19th century would approve of. Wealth was derived from land, and conservatism in all things economic was the rule.

Note on the other review posted: I'm not sure how one could read the same book I read and say "not enough detail and support" for the statements made. The notes and appendixes are almost as long as the text itself! The notes contain references to over 380 works on ancient roman life, so I think the below reviewer was not paying attention.

I recommend this book for non specialists.

Samulkree
MacMullen is one of the leading scholars on economic and social history of the ancient world. But this book shares a common flaw: not enough details and support for the statements made. The conclusions are intriguing but often I was left wondering how everything fit together so neatly; sometimes I couldn't figure it out, on other occassions I had to say "no, don't agree with that interpretation." Is worth reading for the scholars out there.

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