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American Empire and the Politics of Meaning: Elite Political Cultures in the Philippines and Puerto Rico during U.S. Colonialism (Politics, History, and Culture) epub ebook

by Julian Go

American Empire and the Politics of Meaning: Elite Political Cultures in the Philippines and Puerto Rico during U.S. Colonialism (Politics, History, and Culture) epub ebook

Author: Julian Go
Category: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Duke University Press Books (March 14, 2008)
Pages: 392 pages
ISBN: 0822342111
ISBN13: 978-0822342113
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 508
Other formats: txt mobi lrf docx


Colonialism by Julian Go As we approach the end of the long American century, there is a renewed scholarly interest in its origins, the informal empire of islands acquired as a result of that "splendid little war," the Spanish-American War of 1898

In the second half of American Empire, Go illustrates how American occupation led not only to the reproduction of familiar meanings under different tropes, but also helped change the meanings behind them, thus altering the practice of local political systems. In the case of Puerto Rico and the Philippines, the context is American occupation, and it was either traditional power structures or the socioeconomic context that changed, or, as was the case in Puerto Rico, a combination of both.

Fascinating look at the cultures of Puerto Rico and the Philippines under US rule. Paul Vittay rated it liked it Apr 13, 2019. Amber rated it it was ok Jan 30, 2016. Tina Shull rated it it was amazing Jul 13, 2015. Alex Gilvarry rated it it was amazing Dec 18, 2011. Wyndinthewillows rated it liked it Feb 28, 2016.

The sociologist Julian Go unravels how American authorities used culture as both . Colonialism and Culture in the American Empire. 1. Tutelary Colonialism and Cultural Power.

The sociologist Julian Go unravels how American authorities used culture as both a tool and a target of rule, and how the Puerto Rican and Philippine elite received, creatively engaged, and sometimes silently subverted the Americans’ ostensibly benign intentions. When the United States took control of the Philippines and Puerto Rico in the wake of the Spanish-American War, it declared that it would transform its new colonies through lessons in self-government and the ways of American-style democracy. 25. Domesticating Tutelage in Puerto Rico.

Latin American Politics and Society. Julian Go, American Empire and the Politics of Meaning: Elite Political Cultures in the Philippines and Puerto Rico During . Durham: Duke University Press, 2008. William A. Morgan (a1). Published online by Cambridge University Press: 02 January 2018. Export citation Request permission. Recommend this journal.

When the United States took control of the Philippines and Puerto Rico in the wake of the Spanish-American War, it declared that it would transform its new colonies through lessons in self-government and the ways of American-style democracy. In both territories, . colonial officials built extensive public school systems, and they set up American-style elections and governmental institutions.

"By combining rich historical detail with broader theories of meaning, culture, and colonialism, the author provides an innovative study of the hidden intersections of political power and cultural meaning-making in America’s earliest overseas empire. Copublished with Duke University Press.

Cultures in the Philippines and Puerto Rico during . Politics, History, and Culture. Duke University Press.

American Empire and the Politics of Meaning: Elite Political Cultures in the Philippines and Puerto Rico during .

Julian Go, American Empire and the Politics of Meaning: Elite Political Cultures in the Philippines and . Willard B. Gatewood, Black Americans and the Quest for Empire, 1898–1903, Journal of Southern History 38, no. 4 (November 1972): 54. rossRefGoogle Scholar.

Julian Go, American Empire and the Politics of Meaning: Elite Political Cultures in the Philippines and Puerto Rico during . Colonialism (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2008), 18–23. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. 67. Howard N. Meyer, e. The Magnificent Activist: The Writings of Thomas Wentworth Higginson (Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press, 2000), 402–3.

Julian Go. When the United States took control of the Philippines and Puerto Rico in the wake of the Spanish-American War, it declared that it would transform its new colonies through lessons in self-government and the ways of American-style democrac. The officials aimed their lessons in democratic government at the political elite: the relatively small class of the wealthy, educated, and politically powerful within each colony.

When the United States took control of the Philippines and Puerto Rico in the wake of the Spanish-American War, it declared that it would transform its new colonies through lessons in self-government and the ways of American-style democracy. In both territories, U.S. colonial officials built extensive public school systems, and they set up American-style elections and governmental institutions. The officials aimed their lessons in democratic government at the political elite: the relatively small class of the wealthy, educated, and politically powerful within each colony. While they retained ultimate control for themselves, the Americans let the elite vote, hold local office, and formulate legislation in national assemblies.

American Empire and the Politics of Meaning is an examination of how these efforts to provide the elite of Puerto Rico and the Philippines a practical education in self-government played out on the ground in the early years of American colonial rule, from 1898 until 1912. It is the first systematic comparative analysis of these early exercises in American imperial power. The sociologist Julian Go unravels how American authorities used “culture” as both a tool and a target of rule, and how the Puerto Rican and Philippine elite received, creatively engaged, and sometimes silently subverted the Americans’ ostensibly benign intentions. Rather than finding that the attempt to transplant American-style democracy led to incommensurable “culture clashes,” Go assesses complex processes of cultural accommodation and transformation. By combining rich historical detail with broader theories of meaning, culture, and colonialism, he provides an innovative study of the hidden intersections of political power and cultural meaning-making in America’s earliest overseas empire.

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