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Phaedo (The World's Classics) epub ebook

by David Gallop,Plato

Phaedo (The World's Classics) epub ebook

Author: David Gallop,Plato
Category: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Revised edition (September 2, 1993)
Pages: 136 pages
ISBN: 0192830902
ISBN13: 978-0192830906
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 668
Other formats: lit mbr lrf txt


Plato's Phaedo is a classic.

Plato's Phaedo is a classic.

Ships from and sold by BOOK- LAND. Phaedo explains why there is a considerable gap of time between the sentencing and the carrying out of the execution. He refers to the myth of Theseus saving 14 people from the monster Minotour. Plato's Phaedo is a classic.

David Gallop is Professor of Philosophy (Emeritus) at Trent University, Ontario. He taught philosophy at the University of Toronto and at Trent University. Series: Oxford World's Classics. Paperback: 160 pages.

Phaedo (Oxford World's Classics). Gallop's translation, notes, and introduction to Plato's Phaedo shows first rate literary, philosophical and historical competence. -Professor John J. Glanville, San Francisco State University. I appreciate the full Stephanus notation as well as the ample index. -Germain Kopaczynski, St. Hyacinth Clg. & Sem.

Phaedo - Oxford World's Classics (Paperback). The Phaedo is acknowledged to be one of Plato's greatest masterpieces, showing him both as a philosopher and as a dramatist at the height of his powers. It is also a seminal document for many ideas deeply ingrained in western culture, and provides one of the best introductions to Plato's thought.

Phædo or Phaedo, also known to ancient readers as On The Soul, is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. The philosophical subject of the dialogue is the immortality of the soul. It is set in the last hours prior to the death of Socrates, and is Plato's fourth and last dialogue to detail the philosopher's final days, following Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito.

The Phaedo is acknowledged to be one of Plato's masterpieces, showing him both as a philosopher and as a dramatist at the .

The Phaedo is acknowledged to be one of Plato's masterpieces, showing him both as a philosopher and as a dramatist at the height of his powers. It is also a documentcrucial to the understanding of many ideas deeply ingrained in western culture, and provides one of the best introductions to Plato's thought.

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Persons of the Dialogue PHAEDO, who is the narrator of the dialogue to ECHECRATES of Phlius SOCRATES APOLLODORUS SIMMIAS CEBES CRITO ATTENDANT OF THE PRISON Scene The Prison of Socrates. Place OF THE NARRATION: Phlius. Were you yourself, Phaedo, in the prison with Socrates on the day when he drank the poison? Phaedo. Yes, Echecrates, I was.

Phaedo (Oxford World's Classics) New Paperback Book Plato, David Gallop. Phaedo (Oxford World's Classics) NUEVO Brossura Libro Plato, David Gallop. Phaedo (Oxford World's Classics) NOUVEAU Broche Livre Plato, David Gallop. Phaedo (Oxford World's Classics) New Paperback Book Plato, David Gallop.

The Phaedo is acknowledged to be one of Plato's masterpieces, showing him both as a philosopher and as a dramatist at the height of his powers. For its moving account of the execution of Socrates, the Phaedo ranks among the supreme literary achievements of antiquity. It is also a document crucial to the understanding of many ideas deeply ingrained in western culture, and provides one of the best introductions to Plato's thought. This new edition is eminently suitable for readers new to Plato, offering a readable translation which is accessible without the aid of a commentary and assumes no prior knowledge of the ancient Greek world or language.
Reviews (7)
Skillet
The introductory essay of this edition is superb. It emphasises the monster in us that need to be slayed to free ourselves. That monster, ie the Minotour, is originated in the opening passages of Phaedo.

Phaedo explains why there is a considerable gap of time between the sentencing and the carrying out of the execution. He refers to the myth of Theseus saving 14 people from the monster Minotour.

Socrates is the Theseus, he is saving the 14 people who are with him at that time (see 59B for a list of the 14 companions of Socrates). The Minotour is the fear of death and the fear of argument (logos).

The book itself is also divided into 14 sections:
I. Opening
II. Separateness and the care of death
III.Argument from contraries
IV.Argument from recollection
V. Songs for children
VI. Argument from invisibility
VII. Lyre and the weaver
VIII. Hatred of argument
IX.Tuning undone
X. Threat of blindness and the second sailing
XI.Enthusiasm of Echecrates
XII. Argument from cause
XIII.The true earth myth
XIV. The End.

Beautiful, only Plato can write a book like this.

Boraston
I have no desire to critique Plato or to give a synopsis of his Phaedo. What drew me to this review is actually the translators' introduction. Brann, Kalkavage and Salem do, what I think, is an excellent job at breaking down the imagery and themes of the piece while adding a tremendous amount of background. If this were my first encounter with Plato or Greek thought in general, I would find the introduction to be infinitely valuable. For example, the translators point out that Socrates' execution is being postponed due to a celebration. As it goes, each year the Athenians, in accordance to their vow to Apollo, send an emissary to Delos. Before they return, the city must keep itself pure and not put anyone to death. This is to commemorate Theseus' recovery of fourteen young Athenians from the Minotaur of Crete. Now in the Phaedo, Socrates is Theseus, the fourteen present are the same from the Minotaur's labyrinth and the Minotaur represents death itself. Personally, I found that little bit of information both charming and useful. The introduction is jam-packed full of such goodies that will help the reader gain a deeper understanding of this piece than if he or she were to just read it alone.

Andromajurus
Any translation or writing on Plato that has Kalkavage's name is must read. Very few contemporary academics can write with the fluency and understanding of classic Plato as Hegelian Kalkavage can. Oh yeah, Brann is pretty good too...

Xar
The translation is fine conceptually, but the digital version doesn't section it out the way physical copies do. This makes it confusing when you're looking for particular parts in class and it makes referencing it difficult as well.

If you're just looking to read Phaedo, this is perfectly fine, but if you're trying to use if for a class/research I would suggest getting a different version.

Zuser
Plato's Phaedo is a classic. This review is focused more on what makes this book different from others, which is it's commentary. It contains comments on plot meanings, word meanings, literature references, and more. Only thing I did not like about the book was that the commentary is in the back, so if want to read the commentary right after reading the line or paragraph it is about you need to keep flipping back and forth in the book. I would have rather had the comments at the bottom of the page.

Zadora
A very small book and a relatively short read, but if anyone is interested in knowing Plato's philosophy of the soul, this is the book to read.

Runemane
This appears in the Editorial Review notes for this edition:

"Gallop's translation, notes, and introduction to Plato's Phaedo shows first rate literary, philosophical and historical competence."--Professor John J. Glanville, San Francisco State University

Yet, the copy I received clearly states "translated by Benjamin Jowett."

I reached this edition from an Oxford Edition which is translated by Mr. Gallop. I thought I was "safe," even though I understood I was not getting exactly the Kindle version of the Oxford Edition, with all it's introductory material. (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0192839535/ref=x_gr_w_bb?ie=UTF8&tag=httpwwwgoodco-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0192839535&SubscriptionId=1MGPYB6YW3HWK55XCGG2)

But I have (once again) been snafu-ed by Amazon's careless handling of listings and comments, especially for Kindle editions.

Although the price was not high and there is introductory material, I thought I was purchasing Mr. Gallop's translation!

Beware!

(Yes, on hindsight, I can see that I could have caught this from the data at the top of the listing and from the "Look Inside." Given how I reached this listing (from the Oxford Edition) and the material under Reviews, neither of those particularly pacify my frustration.)

classic

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