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Roman Society: A Social, Economic, and Cultural History epub ebook

by Henry Boren

Roman Society: A Social, Economic, and Cultural History epub ebook

Author: Henry Boren
Category: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Cengage Learning; 2 edition (January 2, 1991)
Pages: 368 pages
ISBN: 0669178012
ISBN13: 978-0669178012
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 557
Other formats: azw docx docx lit


Roman Society: A Social,. has been added to your Cart. An excellent book that stands on its own as a useful overview of Roman Society and its cultural and political institutions within the context of its history.

Roman Society: A Social,. 6 people found this helpful.

Start by marking Roman Society: A Social, Economic, and Cultural History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

338 pages : 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (pages 325-332) and index. Beginnings - The early republic, 509-287 . From city-state to domination of Italy, 360-264 . Changing times, 264-133 . From the Gracchi to the "First Triumvirate," 133-60 . Failure of the Oligarchy: Caesar to Augustus, 60-30 . Social change in the late republic. The early empire: Augustus and Tiberlius, 27 . -A.

Items related to Roman society: A social, economic, and cultural history. Ideal for a one-semester course in Roman civilization or history, Roman Society offers a broad synthesis of the social, economic, and cultural history of this civilization. Henry Charles Boren Roman society: A social, economic, and cultural history (Civilization and society). ISBN 13: 9780669846812. Topics such as social class, religion, the roles of women and slaves, and inflation are all covered, and maps, photographs, and a chronological chart complement the narrative.

Religion and culture. The decline of Roman rule. Ecclesiastical architecture flourished, showing a strong French influence: Henry III’s patronage of the new Westminster Abbey was particularly notable. The invaders and their early settlements. Edward I’s castles in North Wales rank high among the finest examples of medieval military architecture.

Boren is an author of numerous professional articles and books on ancient history specializing in ancient Rome, including "Roman Society, A Social, Economic and Cultural History.

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. Boren is an author of numerous professional articles and books on ancient history specializing in ancient Rome, including "Roman Society, A Social, Economic and Cultural History. "Henry Boren Obituary". The News & Observer.

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Excellent Overview of Roman Social, Economic and Cultural History. Published by Thriftbooks An excellent book that stands on its own as a useful overview of Roman Society and its cultural and political institutions within the context of its history. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 12 years ago. Professor Boren takes on the difficult task of explaining the development of Roman political institutions within the framework of social and economic developments that characterized the rise of the Romans from a regional to international power.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Made in America: a social history of American culture and character. State, Society and Mobilization in Europe during the First World War (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare).

Ideal for a one-semester course in Roman civilization or history, Roman Society offers a broad synthesis of the social, economic, and cultural history of this civilization. Topics such as social class, religion, the roles of women and slaves, and inflation are all covered, and maps, photographs, and a chronological chart complement the narrative.
Reviews (2)
Anayalore
This book was the primary textbook for my college Roman Civilization class. I liked the book then and regretted that we had to rush through it so quickly and only read certain parts of it. Now that I have graduated, I at last have had time to read the entire book at a leisurely pace and really think about what I've read. On the whole, I think this book provides an excellent overview of ancient Roman culture. Historically the book covers the period from Rome's mythical beginnings to the collapse of the Western Empire, as after that point another era really begins. But history is only a part of the book. It also gives an idea of the social structures, such as the home and family, and marriage and parenthood, which were quite different from our own. It also gives an idea of governmental, political, and social structures, including the rather complicated patron-client relationships. Interwoven are discussions of the economic and monetary systems, the military, trade and technology, religion, art and literature. None of these things can really be separated, as all these forces are interactive and influence one another. That author Henry C. Boren was able to discuss all these elements in only one relatively short book is quite remarkable. Our class also used Shelton's sourcebook, AS THE ROMANS DID, for specific examples. These two books together provide an excellent framework for any further study of Ancient Rome. Highly recommended. Five stars.

Hamrl
Professor Boren takes on the difficult task of explaining the development of Roman political institutions within the framework of social and economic developments that characterized the rise of the Romans from a regional to international power.

Tracing the origins of the Roman people as possible refugees from the Trojan War who settled in and around a small backwater village on the Tiber River in Italy through the rise of their economic power and increased rivalry with their Etruscan neighbors, he explains how the Romans' penchant for both the organization and imitation of the positive traits of the peoples around gave them cultural and political advantages over their neighbors and propelled them to become a republic, to defeat first their immediate neighbor, the Etruscans, then the highly organized North African city-state, Carthage. From there, Rome went on to establish itself first as the leading power on the Italian peninsula and with the gradual conquest of lands in every direction from Italy, to become first a regional power and eventually the dominant force in Europe, North Africa and Eastern Asia.

Boren explains that it was ongoing rivalry between the ancient landed nobility, the thirty-plus patrician families called the patricians and the emerging economic power of the "new men," new entries into the nobility, of bright and ambitious men such as Cicero and Pompey that led to the eventual downfall of the old republic when the Roman people decided to support economic and political "peace" even at the surrender of their ancient freedoms long guaranteed by a Senate that had become a hollow corrupt shell of the original grand and noble institution it once was.

With the advent of the Empire, under Julius Caesar and after his assassination on March 15, 44 B.C, soon under his nephew and "chosen heir," Octavian, who became Caesar Augustus, a long period of political order came to the Rome to be known as the "Pax Romana." During this period a tremendous spurt of both political and economic growth came about.

But social and political excesses, corruption, civil wars, pressure from incoming barbarian hordes and the removal of political power from Rome to Constantinople led to the initial decline and eventual fall of Roman power, first in the West with the sacking of Rome by barbarians in 344 and eventually in the East with the fall of Constantinople.

Boren makes an excellent case for characterizing the decline of Rome not as some mere "historical accident," but rather as the direct and inevitable result of the decline of the social and political institutions that had once propelled Rome to the world stage.

An excellent book that stands on its own as a useful overview of Roman Society and its cultural and political institutions within the context of its history.

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