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Theories of Consciousness: An Introduction (Philosophical Issues in Science) epub ebook

by William Seager

Theories of Consciousness: An Introduction (Philosophical Issues in Science) epub ebook

Author: William Seager
Category: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (April 2, 1999)
Pages: 320 pages
ISBN: 0415183944
ISBN13: 978-0415183949
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 597
Other formats: txt azw mobi rtf


Series: Philosophical Issues in Science.

Series: Philosophical Issues in Science. Paperback: 320 pages. Bottom line is - for people really serious about consciousness, I think this book is worth adding to the library.

Theories of Consciousness: an introduction and assessment/William Seager. p. cm. – (Philosophical issues in science).

REAL HISTORY Martin Bunzl. BRUTE SCIENCE Hugh LaFollette and Niall Shanks. THEORIES OF CONSCIOUSNESS An introduction and assessment William Seager. Theories of. Consciousness. An introduction and assessment. Theories of Consciousness: an introduction and assessment/William Seager. Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Consciousness 2. Mind and body.

Part I: Philosophical Theories of Consciousness. Part II: Scientific Theories of Consciousness. Epilogue: A Brief Tour of the Introductions to Consciousness Studies. Science cannot be deaf to conceptual analy-ses, as much as philosophy cannot be blind to scientic results. Arguably, the most fruitful methodology for studying the human mind is to favor a multidisciplinary and highly integrated approach, capable of combining relevant ndings from differ-ent disciplines.

Theories of Consciousness book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Theories of Consciousness: An Introduction as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The book's broad scope, depth of coverage and focus on key philosophical positions and arguments make it an indispensable text for those teaching or studying philosophy of mind and psychology.

The problem of consciousness is arguably the central issue in current theorizing about the mind. We need to understand both what consciousness is and how it relates to other, nonconscious, aspects of reality. History of the issue. 2. Concepts of Consciousness. Creature Consciousness.

Science, Emergence and Consciousness. Book follows a more philosophical. jp: Theories of Consciousness: An Introduction. es : -5% de descuento en Theories of Consciousness: An Introduction (Philosophical Issues in Science).

William Seager is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto, Scarborough, Canada, where he has taught for over 25 years

William Seager is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto, Scarborough, Canada, where he has taught for over 25 years. He is the author of Metaphysics of Consciousness (1991), and Natural Fabrications: Science, Emergence and Consciousness (2012).

This text seemed to be directed to freshman-level college students to introduce the idea that they will encounter instances in their work that demand they take a stand

This text seemed to be directed to freshman-level college students to introduce the idea that they will encounter instances in their work that demand they take a stand. But the content appeared to focus disproportionately on the power differential between PIs and young grad students and/or lab workers

The most remarkable fact about the universe is that certain parts of it are conscious. Somehow nature has managed to pull the rabbit of experience out of a hat made of mere matter. Making its own contribution to the current, lively debate about the nature of consciousness, Theories of Consciousness introduces variety of approaches to consciousness and explores to what extent scientific understanding of consciousness is possible. Including discussion of key figures, such as Descartes, Foder, Dennett and Chalmers, the book covers identity theories, representational theories, intentionality, externalism, and the new information-based theories.

Reviews (3)
Mr.Death
First of all, I think it's pretty nuts that the reviewer above can say that Seager gives panpsychism "short shrift" - did he not make it to the last chapter? That chapter, by the way, is entitled "Consciousness, Information, and PANPSYCHISM", and the entire point of it is to try to construct a defense of....PANPSYCHISM (this results from a consideration of Chalmers's ideas). In an academic climate in which, justifiably or not, panpsychism is often taken about as seriously as David Icke's theory of reptilian "shape-shifters" controlling the world (with panpsychists thus being seen as worthy of the Art Bell show rather than any professorial chair), one can hardly imagine a more serious attempt (in a book of this modest size anyway) at an explanation and defense of this theory than the one provided by Seager.

Kudos to Seager for treating what he calls the "generation problem" seriously (that is, how in the world can non-conscious matter generate consciousness?) and for avoiding the off-putting dogmatism displayed by certain other consciousness researchers.

I appreciate also that he takes seriously the question of what kind of understanding we ought ever justifiably to expect of consciousness, since we are denied third person observation of consciousness, and are therefore left largely trying to understand consciousness by and through it itself.

Potential buyers should know that this book is one man's meditation on this difficult subject, rather than a general "introduction to consciousness" (for that, buy the Susan Blackmore book, "Consciousness: An Introduction"). It is also pretty technical. I am fairly new to this topic, but because I had already read through the Blackmore book and some others, I was able to get most of what Seager says. So, it is not of value exclusively to other scholars; but without some prior introduction to consciousness, the reader will be quite confused.

This book was written in 1999. Because Seager seems like a fair and thoughtful guy, I would like to see an updated version of this book taking into account some of what has transpired in the field since then.

Bottom line is - for people really serious about consciousness, I think this book is worth adding to the library.

Zeueli
I am writing a full, formal review of this book for _Philosophical Psychology_, where I develop some of my criticisms in more detail. This is just a short preview of what's to come.
This book is an interesting read, although it is definately not for the beginner. It assumes a good amount of philosophical training already-- which is not a bad thing, but such training would already assume familiarity with some of the issues that Seager tries to present in this introduction. The book could also use some closer editing-- there are a few embarrasing typos and awkward sentences that the editors at Rutledge should have caught.
As for the content, the book his hit and miss. The chapter on HOT theory is excellent, and as good an introduction as any. The first chapter on Dennett is also valuable. But Seager has the strangest reading of Descartes I've seen, and his eagerness to suggest emperical experiments to undermine verificantionist thought experiments actually betray his tendency towards armchair philosophy. He also gives panpsychism short shrift. Perhaps most eggregious is the chapter on identity theory: no mention of the work of Smart, Place, and Armstrong at all. Rather, Seager attacks a going model of qualia, Paul Churchland's vector theory, and shows why it can't work as a full theory of consciousness. While his criticism stands, its just sloppy to ignore the philosophical and historical contributions to the mind/body debate and then try to rebutt a specific model with the complaint that it doesn't address the issues that are most philosophically interesting.
For all that, though, the book makes many good points and clears up a number of misconceptions, especially about HOT theory and representatonalist theories. I think chapters of this book will make good readings for undergrad seminars on consciousness or phil of mind, or perhaps even intro grad seminars. But, if you're really interested in consciousness, I still recommend the anthology by Block, Flanagan, and Guzeldere _The Nature of Consciousness_. You'll get more of your money's worth.

Ger
William Seager gives a wonderful account of all the predominant theories of consciousness that have been given, begining with Descartes, right up to the present, and critically analyzes them. He describes the issues with detail and gives valuable insights. Though not a difficult read, I do not recommend going through the book too quickly, as you should take care to understand what is being said. Basic knowledge of philosophy of mind would be a valuable asset. The *perfect* book for begining a journey into consciousness!

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