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Genealogy of Nihilism (Routledge Radical Orthodoxy) epub ebook

by Conor Cunningham

Genealogy of Nihilism (Routledge Radical Orthodoxy) epub ebook

Author: Conor Cunningham
Category: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (September 20, 2002)
Pages: 336 pages
ISBN: 0415276934
ISBN13: 978-0415276931
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 193
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In Genealogy of Nihilism, Cunningham interrogates a plethora of thinkers-ranging from Plotinus to Badiou!-and their variegated involvements . I had my doubts about "Radical Orthodoxy" but this book has removed many of them. 9 people found this helpful.

In Genealogy of Nihilism, Cunningham interrogates a plethora of thinkers-ranging from Plotinus to Badiou!-and their variegated involvements with a logic of nihilism. At the core of the book, is the claim that throughout the course of the history of philosophy, the logic of nihilism has posits a concept of the nothing, as something.

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Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Theology Conor Cunningham . Genealogy of Nihilism Routledge Radical Orthodoxy.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Conor Cunningham is a doctor of theology and teacher of divinity at the University of Cambridge. His previous academic interests have included the study of Law, Social Science and Philosophy, and he was among the original contributors to Radical Orthodoxy: A New Theology (Routledge, 1999). 1134474008, 9781134474004.

Radical orthodoxy is a Christian theological and philosophical school of thought which makes use of postmodern philosophy to reject the paradigm of modernity

Radical orthodoxy is a Christian theological and philosophical school of thought which makes use of postmodern philosophy to reject the paradigm of modernity.

Genealogy of Nihilism book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Genealogy of Nihilism (Routledge Radical Orthodoxy) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

series Routledge Radical Orthodoxy. This text re-reads Western history in the light of nihilistic logic, which pervades two millennia of Western thought. From Parmenides to Alain Badiou, via Plotinus, Avicenna, Duns Scotus, Ockham, Descartes, Spinoza, Kant, Hegel, Heidegger, Sartre, Lacan, Deleuze and Derrida, a genealogy of nothingness can be witnessed in development, with devastating consequences for the way we live.

This text re-reads Western history in the light of nihilistic logic, which pervades two millennia of Western thought

This text re-reads Western history in the light of nihilistic logic, which pervades two millennia of Western thought.

Conor's first monograph was Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies .

Conor's first monograph was Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Nothing and the Difference of Theology (Routledge: London and New York, 2002), this is being translated into Spanish. Conor's expertise includes: - philosophical theology.

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by: Conor Cunningham. Publisher: Routledge. Print ISBN: 9780415276931, 0415276934. eText ISBN: 9781134474004, 1134474008.

This text re-reads Western history in the light of nihilistic logic, which pervades two millennia of Western thought. From Parmenides to Alain Badiou, via Plotinus, Avicenna, Duns Scotus, Ockham, Descartes, Spinoza, Kant, Hegel, Heidegger, Sartre, Lacan, Deleuze and Derrida, a genealogy of nothingness can be witnessed in development, with devastating consequences for the way we live.
Reviews (6)
Faell
A marvelously creative critical engagement with the philosophy of nihilism. Perhaps I read a different book than some of the other reviewers, who seem to think Cunningham’s thesis is something along the lines of: nihilism=bad, Christianity=good. Yet, if one bothers to open the book, one finds that there are pages inside...with words on them. In reading these words, it becomes quite evident just how widely read and deeply conversive with nihilistic thought Cunningham actually is. Nor is this an “attack” on nihilism from a Christian perspective. It is instead a profound engagement with the central insights of such “nihilistic thinkers” as Spinoza, Hegel, Lacan, Derrida, Deleuze, Zizek, and others. Indeed, for Cunningham, nihilism is not so muc opposed to Christianity as it is ordered to it—as nature is ordered to grace or promise is ordered to fulfillment. Even if one does not accept the conclusion of his argument, however, Cunningham certainly provides much to appreciate (and—though I suspect some may be incapable of imagining this—learn from) along the way.

Macill
Christianized "Nihilism" -- waste of time.

Marelyne
In Genealogy of Nihilism, Cunningham interrogates a plethora of thinkers--ranging from Plotinus to Badiou!--and their variegated involvements with a logic of nihilism. At the core of the book, is the claim that throughout the course of the history of philosophy, the logic of nihilism has posits a concept of the nothing, as something. This is to say, that philosophies of the nothing, on account of their attempt to render the nothing as something, betray their own proximity to theologies of creation ex nihilo. Moreover, the key continental philosophies of nihilism, e.g. Fichte, Kant, Hegel, Heidegger, Derrida, operate according to a dualistic logic that is ultimately grounded in a monism that generates their movement and generation. As Cunningham writes, "The aforementioned quandary [aporetic dualisms of finitude] can be seened throughout the history of philosophy. We pay witness to it in the dualisms employed to cope with this aporia. For example: Lacan and Deleuze ground sense in non-sense; Derrida grounds the Text in the Nothing, which is said to reside outside it; Heidegger grounds Being in das Nicht; Hegel, finitude in the infinite, Fichte, I in Non-I; Schopenhauer, representation in will; Kant, phenomenal in noumenal; Spinoza, Nature in God, and God in Nature."
As Cunningham proceeds with an impressive survey of medieval thought, detailing the Pagan aspects of Plotinus' emanation and moving through accomplished discussions of medieval nominalism in thinkers like Avicenna, Ghent, Scotus, and Ockham, we are treated with an impressive demonstration of nominalism's tendency to render the nothing as something.
However, Cunningham's treatment of early modern thinkers like Spinoza, as well as of 20th century continentalists like Heidegger and Derrida are just rife with confusion. Regarding Spinoza's dual-aspect monism, Cunningham writes that in terms of the aproria [of dualisms of finitude], Spinoza "copes with it by generating the dualism God or Nature; God supplements Nature, while Nature supplements God. But the simultaneous movement between each betrays a monism, in terms of a single substance" (59). I can find no way to think of Spinoza's dualism of God and Nature in terms of a "supplement." Indeed, there is only the single substance, namely God, which is identical to nature. But neither concepts function in terms of a supplement--these distinctions are merely aspectival, not substantive. His analysis therefore suffers as he proceeds to relate Spinoza's monism to what he coins "Pan(A)Theistic Acosmim", a rather dubious term that incorrectly attributes transcendence to nature.
The section on Heidegger is interesting for its discussion on the relation of Celan's poetry to Heidegger, but the analysis still suffers from some flat-footed readings of Heidegger's work. Cunningham's basic reading is predicated on a fundamental mis-identification between Being and the Nothing. Heidegger makes no such identification. As Cunningham writes, "Dasein, in understanding death, can comprehend its own nothingness, and so begin to approach Being in an ontological manner, which means precisely, for Heidegger, to approach Being as nothing. (138) Ontology does not denote understanding Being on the basis of nothing--not in Being and Time, and not in any of the later work. Being as event is the event of co-propriation and the nothing is, if anything, the groundless ground of Being. It is important to follow Heidegger's strange machinery as his ontology captures the ways in which nothingness permeates the beings of the world, and the way in which Dasein's thrown projection discloses its ownmost possibility of no longer being possible.
It is for these reasons Cunningham's excursus into the regions of continental thought is plagued with misinformation. Despite such lapses, his study is valuable indeed for its ambition, its accomplished treatments of nominalism in medieval thought, its fine analysis of Hegel, and its provocative Trinitarian thesis.

Helo
I really did not enjoy this book. Cunningham identifies the "logic of nihilism" as a consequence of a univocity of a non-being that results from an un collapsible, dualistic aporia and reads this model into everyone from Plotinus to Badiou. According to Cunningham, the logic of nihilism cannot adequately "provide" (he develops a "technical" understanding of this term)a cosmological account. The solution to this problem? The trinity and the christian god.

The book is obscure, jargony and full of appeals to authority, most infuriatingly to the bible. It offers nothing new to the discourse on nihilism (like most contemporary books on the subject, excluding Brassier's work) and ultimately,unconvincingly and uninterestingly shows why nihilists (a category Cunningham reduces and abuses so heavily that it ends up applying to all philosophers who do not accept christ as god in person blah, blah, blah...) and theologians cannot agree: Philosophers who do not accept god cannot give a satisfactory theological account of creation. He completely neglects the fact that nihilism is, in the hands of many, a weapon to be used against this kind of reductive and childish christian ideology.

Ultimately, this book is of a very low quality and a high price. Do not buy it unless you've already drank the christian cool-aid.

Rishason
This is a difficult book, but truly superb - hence the difficulty! I had my doubts about "Radical Orthodoxy" but this book has removed many of them.

Twentyfirstfinger
I am no professional philosopher of any kind but I am an amateur study. I think they did a good job in this book of explaining nihilistic philosophies in ways but the whole refutation is simply a baseless assertion in belief to "imagine" one's self out of the valid issues that nihilistic philosophers bring up. The authors bring up the UTILITY of comfort that the belief in Christ and absolute value through God, but they do not really establish the solidity of such a thing. It is a placeholder, a fragile bridge over the chasm of meaninglessness that could never span the full breadth of reality. But the utility of it is indeed there nontheless. The effect of believing in God is the effect of believing in God, not the effect of God.

Ultimately only useful to people who still have Christian faith. I wouldn't recommend it otherwise.

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