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Suitcase Filled with Nails: Lessons Learned from Teaching Art in Kuwait epub ebook

by Yvonne Wakefield

Suitcase Filled with Nails: Lessons Learned from Teaching Art in Kuwait epub ebook

Author: Yvonne Wakefield
Language: English
Publisher: Book Publishers Network; first edition edition (2012)
Pages: 242 pages
ISBN: 1937454347
ISBN13: 978-1937454340
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 167
Other formats: azw doc txt rtf


Suitcase Filled with Nails book. Yvonne Wakefield naively leaves behind a secure life in the lush Pacific Northwest to teach art in the desert state of Kuwait.

Suitcase Filled with Nails book. For six years, she will instruct university aged Muslim women, earn their trust, and learn the consequences of freedom of expression, taken for granted in one culture but not granted in another. Told from the unique perspective of an artist, Suitcase Filled with Nails is a riveting, I COULD NOT PUT IT DOWN. I LOVED it. -Susan Jane Gilman, NYT best selling author.

15 quotes from Suitcase Filled with Nails: Lessons Learned from Teaching Art in Kuwait: ‘Their questions, their interpretations of a piece of art, help . .Suitcase Filled with Nails Quotes Showing 1-15 of 15. Their questions, their interpretations of a piece of art, help me get a little more of a glimpse into the minds and hearts of the young women with whom I’m working. Yvonne Wakefield, Suitcase Filled with Nails.

The introduction to "Suitcase Filled with Nails: Lessons Learned Teaching Art in Kuwait," the story of my years teaching in Kuwait .

The introduction to "Suitcase Filled with Nails: Lessons Learned Teaching Art in Kuwait," the story of my years teaching in Kuwait, a lesson learned. injustice knows no bounds. Suitcase Filled with Nails & Babe in the Woods. 17 September 2018 ·. An FYI for everyone who has been asking about "Babe in the Woods: Building a Life One Log at a Time. However none of the royalties are being paid to me.

From page 54 in Suitcase Filled with Nails: Lessons Learned from Teaching in Kuwait. as I wait the orange-and-white kitten with a festering leg limps from behind the shelf. The elevator door opens. I get in and stare back at the pathetic thing. That pathetic thing turned into . Kuwaiti Cat) the cat I would claim and eventually fly him out of Kuwait wheree I was working as an art professor. took his final flight yesterday August 2, 2019. Suitcase Filled with Nails & Babe in the Woods

Yvonne Pepin-Wakefield and Yvonne Wakefield.

Yvonne Pepin-Wakefield and Yvonne Wakefield. At the age of 18 Yvonne built a log cabin in the Oregon mountains, and is currently working on a series of three books about this and subsequent experiences of building with logs and living in the wilderness.

Results from Google Books

Results from Google Books. A spirited artist with a can-do attitude, Yvonne Wakefield leaves behind a secure life in the lush Pacific Northwest to teach art in the desert state of Kuwait. Over the course of six years, she will instruct university-aged Muslim women, earn her students' trust, and learn the consequences of freedom of expression, taken for granted in one culture but not granted in another. Told from the unique perspective of an artist, Suitcase Filled with Nails is a colorful, true, timely, rare and riveting tale about living and coping in the Middle East.

3 books of Yvonne Wakefield. A spirited artist with a can-­do attitude Yvonne Wakefield naively leaves behind a secure life in the lush Pacific Northwest to teach art in the desert state of Kuwait. Suitcase Filled With Nails: Lessons Learned from Teaching Art in Kuwait. Over the course of six years, she will instruct university aged Muslim women, earn her students’ trust, and learn the consequences of freedom of expression, taken for granted in one culture but not granted in another. Despite obstacles set by her detractors, she persists, and her students. and life in Kuwait flourish.

Artist, arts educator and author of Suitcase Filled with Nails: Lessons Learned from Teaching Art in Kuwait, muses on the foggy business of publishing and promoting a book, ála the non-traditional way. The pitfalls and pinnacles of this journey are spliced with meaningful meanderings about the Middle East, Pacific Northwest and points in-between. Monday, August 5, 2013.

A spirited artist with a can-do attitude, Yvonne Wakefield naively leaves behind a secure life in the lush Pacific Northwest to teach art in the desert state of Kuwait. Over the course of six years, she will instruct university aged Muslim women, earn her students' trust, and learn the consequences of freedom of expression, taken for granted in one culture but not granted in another.

Despite obstacles set by her detractors, she persists, and she and her students flourish. Yet the traps never disappear, only multiply as other set more for her, intent on denying what they have no desire to understand. Told from the unique perspective of an artist, Suitcase Filled with Nails is a colorful, true, and timely tale about living and coping in the Middle East.

Reviews (7)
Iaran
Dr. Yvonne has the desire and courage to teach in a Kuwait. Culture clashes and attitudes towards women are difficult for an American woman to understand and accept, but "Doctora" prevails by teaching to her high standards and being respected for her work by her students. For the reader, it is good to see what life is like outside of our country.

Golden Lama
This is an interesting inside journey to a place most of us will never see for ourselves. Along the way we meet women of every personality, and most importantly, we meet women who are living in a most restrictive environment, just because they were born female. The ones who are from wealthy families are more fortunate than those from poverty, but even they have little true freedom of choice. It is hard to believe in the year 2014 such restrictions are still in place as part of a national political practice.
The author conveys her experiences vividly and brings the young women she teaches, to life and we feel we have met them in person.
All the characters that populate her story seem flesh and blood. There are even a few good men, though they are outnumbered by the controlling ones. (There are, to be fair, a couple of women who are not such good or fair people, either).
A very good writer, an interesting story, a bit of history, some art, stray cats (and a dog or three) and many moments of reading to convey the reader to another universe, yet right here on our own planet.

Abywis
I purchased the book because I like learning about cultures other than my own. I know nothing about Kuwait, nor about art, so I could only be enriched by the book! She did write about Kuwaiti culture and food, which was great, and she included some portions about art, which was also nice. I love that she helped to rescue animals while there. It was well written too. The only downside, to me, was that she seemed to be about 80% negative, and only 20 % positive. For someone who stayed as long as she did, there seemed to be so little she liked about being there. I would have liked to have more beauty described to me, and surely it is there in Kuwait somewhere. Were the beaches pretty? Was the skyline of the city gorgeous? Are the mosques beautiful? Surely something was!
Still, I liked the book and was happy with my purchase.

Dogrel
I stopped and started the book several times when the author's decisions to stay and be treated like a non-person got on my nerves. Her lack of preparation for work in a country with very clear rules about interactions between men and women was irritating. I kept going back to it because the ins and outs of working in Kuwait were fascinating. Then I realized that the author could greatly enhance her professional vitae by sticking it out for several years as well as getting several grants for her work and then, Voila! a book. The light bulb went off over my head and I kept reading. Kudos to her for putting up with the awful treatment. I hope it was personally worth it.

Jugami
Fascinating book that I couldn't stop reading. It gave me insights into Kuwait but also was an intriguing novel that revealed the persistence, bravery and naiveté of the author. I loved this book - it was the perfect combination of travel writing, cultural explorations and artist insights. It ended before I was done. Which happily lead me to her next book.
Mena

Qwne
I enjoyed this book. Well-written, full of information about author's years teaching in Kuwait. We readers learn the good points and the bad ones about living and working in a country with so much red tape, government rules, and leadership in her schools. You understand first hand about the young men and women she taught, or met on the street, or in stores. I liked this book on Kindle that I'm buying the hard copy for several of my family.

Jieylau
I kept getting angry and frustrated over the injustice and corruption described by the Doctora. After the second chapter I thought I would put it away. But I didn't, and I'm grateful for that. I would have missed the best parts of the story- kindnesses and friendships and remarkable women who live a life I cannot even imagine myself living. I have to admire the Doctora- she is tough and smart. I'm so glad I stayed to find out the rest of the story.

I loved this book. It was funny and inspirational. She struggled to adjust in a new culture and stood strong through the hardships. I felt the fear and anguish of her unknowing arrival. And the joy and love she experienced. Good book. Must also read Babe in The Woods. Same author. Very Good book as well.

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