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Arthurian Tales: Ambrosius Aureliani epub ebook

by Leon Mintz

Arthurian Tales: Ambrosius Aureliani epub ebook

Author: Leon Mintz
Language: English
Publisher: Erie Harbor Productions; first edition edition (November 15, 2010)
Pages: 352 pages
ISBN: 0971782857
ISBN13: 978-0971782853
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 346
Other formats: lit lrf lrf mbr


The Arthurian legends are not about Arthur alone. A worse problem in my view are various implausibilities in Mintz's story. Characters keep appearing just when someone starts discussing them.

The Arthurian legends are not about Arthur alone. Ambrosius Aureliani tells the story of King Arthur's uncle who has his own epic of the British Isles to tell, of his own struggles for justice. For those with a love for fantasy and Arthurian lore, Ambrosius Aureliani is certainly a choice pick with plenty to entice readers to read further. Leon Mintz grew up in Port Huron, Michigan. Over the years, he has developed an unique writing style.

Ambrosius Aureliani book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Ambrosius Aureliani (Arthurian Tales Book 1) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Mintz (Memoir of the Masses, 2006) organizes a grand cache of myths and historical information to open a new series called Arthurian Tales. An impressive and captivating start to a new series offering Arthurian adventures. Pub Date: Nov. 15th, 2010. The story of Ambrosius, King Arthur’s uncle, proves an epic in its own right, filled with battles during which the grass drank itself red, and chivalrous wisdom, as in the line Good deeds made a person noble, not lands or titles. Mintz also whets the audience’s appetite for fifth-century history, with the bulk of his plot including the taming of the Saxon and Irish heathens.

Ambrosius Aureliani is clearly a labor of love from author Leon Mintz. Arthur is still a boy as the book closes. The range of the story crosses the empire from Ireland to Rome, with much of the action in Gaul as Roman discipline descends into chaos. The story is narrated by Merlin in short, episodic chapters, that have a bit of a choppy feeling.

Ambrosius Aureliani is the legendary uncle of King Arthur and the title of the first book in a series called Arthurian Tales written by Leon Mintz

Ambrosius Aureliani is the legendary uncle of King Arthur and the title of the first book in a series called Arthurian Tales written by Leon Mintz. Ambrosius Aureliani begins with the kidnapping of Theodosius, the son of King Adaulphus and Princess Placidia. Merlinus takes their son to Britain and leaves him there to be raised as a boy named Ambrosius. Years later after being driven off the island, Ambrosius finds refuge at Merlinus' Gallic villa near Aureliani

Ambrosius Aurelianus. Flag as Inappropriate .

Ambrosius Aurelianus. Ambrosius Aurelianus is one of the few people that Gildas identifies by name in his sermon De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae, and the only one named from the 5th century In Baxter's novel, Aurelianus is a minor character who interacts with the book's main Roman-era protagonist, Regina, founder of an (literally) underground matriarchal society.

Ambrosius Aurelianus (Welsh: Emrys Wledig; Anglicised as Ambrose Aurelian and called Aurelius Ambrosius in the Historia Regum Britanniae and elsewhere).

Ambrosius Aurelianus (Welsh: Emrys Wledig; Anglicised as Ambrose Aurelian and called Aurelius Ambrosius in the Historia Regum Britanniae and elsewhere) was a war leader of the Romano-British who won an important battle against the Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century, according to Gildas. He also appeared independently in the legends of the Britons, beginning with the 9th-century Historia Brittonum.

Ambrosius Aurelianus appears in later pseudo-chronicle tradition beginning with Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historiae Regum Britanniae with the slightly garbled name Aurelius Ambrosius, now presented as son of a King Constantine

Ambrosius Aurelianus appears in later pseudo-chronicle tradition beginning with Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historiae Regum Britanniae with the slightly garbled name Aurelius Ambrosius, now presented as son of a King Constantine. When King Constantine's eldest son Constans is murdered at Vortigern's instigation, the two remaining sons, Ambrosius and Uther, still very young, are quickly hustled into exile in Brittany.

Ambrosius Aureliani begins with the kidnapping of Theodosius, the son of King Adaulphus and Princess Placidia. Merlinus takes their son to Britain and leaves him there to be raised as a boy named Ambrosius. Years later after being driven off the island, Ambrosius finds refuge at Merlinus' Gallic villa near Aureliani. With Bishop Germanus of Auxerre, they return to Britain and battle Vortigern and his Saxon army.
Reviews (3)
lacki
This book is so unlike what I normally read but found it to be quite interesting. Liked the authors take on Merlin's life and how through out the book he tried to atone for his misdeed. This was a good back drop to build Arthur on. The only complaint was the lack of a love interest it might have rounded the story out. Looking forward to seeing what the author does next.

the monster
This novel certainly gives the impression of being well researched. It includes a lengthy appendix on the historical sources, justifying the author's timeline and identification of various characters, and it is packed full of references to Roman history. Perhaps the editorial reviewer, and the other reviewer, could be forgiven for assuming that it is as well researched as it seems. However some anachronisms require no special knowledge of history to recognize. For example (p. 191), "Old man GIllan ... sported a dudeen [a clay pipe] though it wasn't always lit and smoking" --- only 1200 years too early! Another is "Urien of Moray" (imported from Geoffrey of Monmouth). Why would a (presumably) Pictish King from the highlands of Scotland have been giving his opinion at a council of Romano-British rulers in London in 429?

A worse problem in my view are various implausibilities in Mintz's story. Characters keep appearing just when someone starts discussing them. He compresses half of all the recorded history (or early legend) of post-Roman 5th century Britain into two years (428-9): the arrival of Hengest and the English as Vortigern's mercenaries, the English revolt, St. Germanus' battle against them and the Picts, Vortimer's battles, the departure of the English for Scandinavia, the return of the English, the massacre of the British elders, the overthrow of Vortigern, and the death of Hengest at the hands of Ambrosius.

The identification of Vortigern with Grallon made no sense to me, either geo-politically or narratively. (And why, if Vortigern was a title not a name, did his son have the name Vortimer?) I could not even see the narrative point of the mystery (to some) of Ambrosius' birth - it doesn't seem to play any great role in his later life other than to act as a constant reminder to Merlin of his guilt.

The book desperately needs proof-reading to eliminate errors like these (p. 274) "Those that had reluctantly recognized his high lordship, now, only nominally observed him [sic]. Descent [sic] didn't disappear when his army defeated Duke Gorlois." Mintz's use of modern language - e.g. "Okay". "Right." - is jarring. He also makes the mistake of beginner writers to think you have to use lots of different verbs for "said". Finally, the story is full of pointless detail - descriptions of places and characters that are unimportant to the story and that the reader has no reason to care about.

As the first reviewer said, this is clearly a work of love, and I'm sorry to have to write such a critical review. I do like the fact that Mintz has put the Arthurian story in a novel historical context. Also, the origin of the round table is a nice vignette, and the death of Ambrosius is genuinely moving. But overall I can only give it 3 stars.

Haal
Ambrosius Aureliani is clearly a labor of love from author Leon Mintz. It is a meticulously researched re-working (yes, another one) of "the matter of Britain." On the fairy-dust spectrum of Arthurian stories, this is hard over at the "this is the way it really happened" end. Mintz's methodology was to look at the few documented sources regarding the twilight of Roman Britain, going back to Gildas, make some interpolations and assumptions (all documented in an appendix), then set forth a possible chronology of events around the 5th Century. He then weaves his story in and around these fixed points.

This volume, the first of a projected four, covers the campaigns of Ambrosius against the invading Saxons, and proposes a relationship between him and characters we know today as Merlin and Uther Pendragon. Arthur is still a boy as the book closes. The range of the story crosses the empire from Ireland to Rome, with much of the action in Gaul as Roman discipline descends into chaos.

The story is narrated by Merlin in short, episodic chapters, that have a bit of a choppy feeling. Anywhere from a few minutes to fourteen years can elapse between chapters. Merlin has to shuttle around Europe (and even to Cathay) a little improbably to get to the scene of the action, and, even then, large swathes of events are introduced by characters in narration. But there's lots of action, some fictional and much historical, to keep things moving along.

The writing could stand some scrutiny by an editor. Characters sometimes slip in unannounced. While the book is written in modern English -- not many of us read Brythonic -- the occasional use of a clearly modern usage like "worst-case scenario" is jarring.

If you're looking for swooning maidens and the trappings of medieval romance, this probably isn't the Arthur series for you. But if you're looking for a little light shown into this murkiest period of history, you'll enjoy reading about how it may have happened. I'm looking forward to the next volume.

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