» » They Don't Get It, Do They?: Communication in the Workplace - Closing the Gap Between Women and Men
hotellemcasadeicervia.it
ePub 1345 kb. | Fb2 1929 kb. | DJVU: 1736 kb.
Money

They Don't Get It, Do They?: Communication in the Workplace - Closing the Gap Between Women and Men epub ebook

by Kathleen Kelley Reardon

They Don't Get It, Do They?: Communication in the Workplace - Closing the Gap Between Women and Men epub ebook

Author: Kathleen Kelley Reardon
Category: Skills
Language: English
Publisher: Little Brown & Co; 1st Pbk. Ed edition (May 1, 1996)
Pages: 200 pages
ISBN: 0316736341
ISBN13: 978-0316736343
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 907
Other formats: lrf txt lit doc


Reardon offers insights into common communication failures between men and women in the business world .

Reardon offers insights into common communication failures between men and women in the business world, offering advice to female executives who feel ignored or misunderstood. I read this book when it first came out and now I'm having my daughter read it! They Don't Get It, Do They? is just as relevant today as it was when I first read it, perhaps even more. Acting like men isn't the answer. Dr. Reardon's writing is succinct and insightful.

Yet history shows that those distinctions are made every day in organizations around the world, where women continue to be poorly represented at the top and significantly underpaid in most fields and at nearly every level. Through hundreds of interviews and her own extensive experience in business, Reardon has produced an insightful examination of the gender communication rift

Kathleen Reardon's mission is to explain what women - and men - can do about it. Summary, et.

Many men haven't learned to define women in terms of their achievement, pigeonholing them instead as wife, daughter, mother, secretary. Women have their own set of myths: it pays to be a good, quiet little worker; so don't make waves. Kathleen Reardon's mission is to explain what women - and men - can do about it. They Don't Get It, Do They? is incisive and practical, based on the experiences of hundreds of working women and filled with telling real-life examples.

They do not get it, do they? Responsibility: Kathleen Kelley Reardon.

Communication in the Workplace-Closing the Gap Between Women and Men, Little, Brown, Boston .

Communication in the Workplace-Closing the Gap Between Women and Men, Little, Brown, Boston MA, US. oogle Scholar. 1996) Reflexive Communication in the Culturally Diverse Workplace, Quorum Books, Westport, Connecticut, US. 3. Davis, M. (Summer, 1988) Avoiding the tragedy of whistleblowing. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 8 (4): 3–19.

Closing the Communication Gap Between Women and Men after writing . To change the overall picture for women in the workplace, it’s critical to change the day-to-day as well.

Communication patterns between women and men have not adequately adjusted to the increasing presence of women in the workplace. Changing this condition means stepping out of the scripts we’re used to enacting, especially the dysfunctional ones.

Reardon, Kathleen Kelley. Rubrics: Sex role in the work environment Communication in organizations Communication Sex differences Case studies Sex discrimination in employment

Reardon, Kathleen Kelley. Little, Brown, (c)1995. Rubrics: Sex role in the work environment Communication in organizations Communication Sex differences Case studies Sex discrimination in employment. Download now They don't get it, do they : communication in the workplace closing the gap between women and men Kathleen Kelley Reardon. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Kathleen Kelley Reardon, Professor of Management and Organization in the .

Kathleen Kelley Reardon, Professor of Management and Organization in the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business has served on the faculty of the MBA, Executive MBA International MBA Programs and the faculty of Preventive Medicine. She is a leading authority on persuasion, politics in the workplace, negotiation, health and interpersonal communication.

Reardon, Kathleen Kelley, They Don’t get It, Do They? Communication in the Workplace-Closing the Gap Between Men and Women. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company, 1995. Requejo, William Hernandez and Graham, John . Global Negotiation: The New Rules

Reardon, Kathleen Kelley, They Don’t get It, Do They? Communication in the Workplace-Closing the Gap Between Men and Women. Global Negotiation: The New Rules.

Two decades after the publication of They Don't Get It, Do They?, much less has changed for women seeking equal opportunity and pay at work than they ever expected. In this book, Kathleen Kelley Reardon Ph.D., the author of The Secret HandshakeIt's All Politics and Comebacks at Work, turns her extraordinary observational skills toward obstacles to women's advancement. Author of such Harvard Business Review articles as "The Memo Every Woman Keeps in Her Desk" and "Courage as a Skill," Reardon fills her book with scores of real-life examples. They Don't Get It, Do They? shows how to identify, understand and overcome the hidden subtexts of business conversations. Men and women speak different languages at work but different shouldn't mean better or worse, Reardon argues. Yet history shows that those distinctions are made every day in organizations around the world, where women continue to be poorly represented at the top and significantly underpaid in most fields and at nearly every level. Through hundreds of interviews and her own extensive experience in business, Reardon has produced an insightful examination of the gender communication rift. She explores how differing perceptions -- as well as realistic concerns that men have of women taking their jobs -- perpetuate a chasm between the sexes. Following Reardon's empowering advice, women can learn to develop a language that bridges the divide without requiring that they mimic men or sacrifice the benefits of their personal styles. Communication, it turns out, is the hard stuff of business and Kathleen Kelley Reardon's books are at the forefront of exploring the complexities so many of us don't notice. This is your chance to learn why we're all at least 75% responsible for the way we're treated at work and what that means for women in terms of turning things around for the better.
Reviews (5)
sergant
It never ceases to amaze me how people who are in fairly privileged positions in life react so vehemently and violently to the least criticism of the social order from which they and their parents before them have benefitted. I believe that Dr. Deborah Tannen's "You Just Don't Understand, Men and Women in Conversation" is a much better book that explains more objectively and empirically the cultural/cognitive differences between men and women; yet still I do not think this work should just be dismissed.

While I do not believe it is useful for anyone to accept the role of victim and take on the helplessness implied in such a label, I also am tired of men who cannot tolerate being asked for once in their lives to seriously examine the perspectives and experiences of women. (I am also tired of women who have so completely bought into a corporate and public policy culture of hierarchical competition that they dismiss the realities of a diversity of perspectives along with their potential advantages.)

As a negotiator, I would be a complete idiot to exclude the worldviews, experiences and cognitive processes of any particular group of people that I was either representing or with whom I was negotiating. Life experience shapes leadership and world views. Any successful negotiation concerning either individuals or communities and nations must necessarily include input from both men and women (or critical concerns/needs get left out and what is agreed upon becomes untenable in actual practice).

My advice: stop reacting with such violent emotion when being asked to expand your understanding of human beings, and accept that different people have had different life experiences and therefore hold different world views than you do. Knowledge is empowerment, not just for the person you are being asked to empathize with, but for yourself. If you are truly critical of this work, then seek out alternative voices on the same topic -- the true differences in life experience and cognitive processes that can be influenced by gender; such books as Deborah Tannen's. Fry and others, while excellent sources for negotiation in general, do not even touch upon these areas.

We may be inclined to prefer objectivity, but most of this world in reality is influenced more often by passions. Only in understanding the origin of those passions can we hope to achieve fair and successful outcomes.

Went Tyu
I was forced to read this as a required text in a Negotiation & Persuasion class in the MBA program at USC, where Dr. Reardon teaches. I and many others in the class were so infuriated by the relentless "I am a victim because I am female" propaganda throughout the entirety of the book that we all returned the text to the bookstore upon finishing it because we could not stand the thought of Dr. Reardon making a dime off of sales to us. The professor that taught the class was so embarrassed by having to assign the text (it was required, oddly enough, by the head of the department who by mere coincidence, I'm sure, happened to be Dr. Reardon), that she sheepishly cut off discussion of the text after only a few minutes. The only victims we were able to find were students who were hoodwinked into paying $1900 to learn negotiation skills but in reality were held captive to the rantings of Dr. Reardon's feminist soapbox. If you are looking to waste your time trying to find out all the ways that men are EVIL and should be eradicated from the workplace, this is your bible. If, however, you are looking for inspiration on how to make your organization a great one for all employees, male and female, I'd look elsewhere, like Warren Bennis' Organizing Genius or the Jan Carlzen's classic Moments of Truth.

Uscavel
As the American workplace becomes more diverse, it's increasingly likely that your coworkers' upbringing, assumptions, and communication rituals are NOT going to be the same as yours. If you go around insisting that your interpretation is always right, or that any misunderstandings are always someone else's fault? Well, that's not going to get you very far. As of the writing of this review, there are something like six job-seekers out there for every job vacancy. If you have communication problems with your coworkers, you're going to be the one who's seen as a problem, and you'll be out the door quickly.

They Don't Get It, Do They? Is an evidence-based but readable guide to communicating in the workplace, and--importantly-- to understanding how your communication style might seem to others.

Kecq
I read this book when it first came out and now I'm having my daughter read it! They Don't Get It, Do They? is just as relevant today as it was when I first read it, perhaps even more. Men and women speak a different language and this book helps women develop a language that bridges the divide in the work place. Acting like men isn't the answer. Dr. Reardon's writing is succinct and insightful. It's a must have handbook for all women in the workforce.

Doukree
This is a must-read book for men and women alike. The author provides valuable insight on the way men and women communicate in the workplace. She provides real life experiences from corporate leaders.

2016-2020 © www.hotellemcasadeicervia.it
All rights reserved