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Writing at the Kitchen Table : The Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David epub ebook

by Artemis Cooper

Writing at the Kitchen Table : The Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David epub ebook

Author: Artemis Cooper
Language: English
Publisher: PENGUIN BOOKS LTD; New Ed edition (2000)
Pages: 384 pages
ISBN: 0140263772
ISBN13: 978-0140263770
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 465
Other formats: lrf txt lrf docx


Artemis Cooper, author of & AT THE KITCHEN TABLE: THE AUTHORIZED . Elizabeth David certainly lived in interesting times

In the space of several decades, David had revolutionized cooking and meal preparation in Britain and introduced the British to really fine wines. Elizabeth David certainly lived in interesting times. A most intriguing aspect of Cooper's biography is her skillful placement of David within her age, a period during which the social mores of the UK changed somewhat dramatically. David had many interesting friends, including the writers Lawrence Durrell and Norman Douglas.

In this wonderful and creative book, Cooper has brought David to life. Artemis Cooper is skilled and wise enough to handle the contradictory sides of David's character without being either censorious or sensational. Derek Cooper, Sunday Times. One of the delights of Artemis Cooper's book is that it makes you go back, time and again, to the source. Arabella Boxer, The Times Literary Supplement.

Start by marking Writing at the Kitchen Table: The . Working from an extensive archive of personal papers, Artemis Cooper reveals the powerful tensions between Elizabeth David's private world and the image of the successful woman she presented to her public.

Start by marking Writing at the Kitchen Table: The Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It is a story that even some of her closest friends never knew.

Writing at the Kitchen Table: The Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David (Penguin Books Ltd, 2004; paperback e. Paris After the Liberation, 1944-1949 (Hamish Hamilton, 1994; Penguin Books, 2007; written with her husband, Antony Beevor). Paris despues de la liberación 1944-1949 (2004, Spanish translation). Words of Mercury (John Murray, 2003; Patrick Leigh Fermor & Artemis Cooper

Elizabeth David's reputation as one of the most influential food writers of the twentieth century rests primarily on her first five books.

Elizabeth David's reputation as one of the most influential food writers of the twentieth century rests primarily on her first five books. Before long every self-respecting cook had a copy of it in the kitchen; between 1955 and 1985, more than a million copies of her book were sold.

The food writer Elizabeth David had published six books and several booklets before 1977. Cooper, Artemis (1999). Writing at the Kitchen Table-The Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David. London: Michael Joseph. ISBN 978-0-7181-4224-7. Cooper, Artemis (2011). David, Elizabeth (1913–1992)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 2 January 2018.

Revealing look into a place and time. com User, January 25, 2002. When I purchased this book, I had no idea who Elizabeth David was, but as a writer I couldn't resist reading about such a successful cookbook author.

Elizabeth David was born into a upper-class family and pursued a rebellious and bohemian life as a student of art and then an. .From the publisher: The authorized biography shortlisted for Waterstones Book. Cairo in the War: 1939-45.

Elizabeth David was born into a upper-class family and pursued a rebellious and bohemian life as a student of art and then an actress in Paris, before running off with a married man to Greece and then settling in Cairo, where she worked for the British government. Artemis Cooper £1. 9.

And thanks to this biography, now those books are informed by the difficult, brilliant, and larger-than-life personality of their creator.

Writing at the Kitchen Table: The Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David. Now, almost a decade after David's death, Artemis Cooper has undertaken the task of telling the story of that very private, difficult, enigmatic, sometimes astonishing, sometimes tragic, life. And an extraordinary story it is - a tale of international adventures and multiple lovers, profound friendships, and carefully nourished grudges. And thanks to this biography, now those books are informed by the difficult, brilliant, and larger-than-life personality of their creator.

Reviews (7)
Naa
The unauthorized biography would have been a lot racier... but Artemis Cooper has served up a light, sometimes frothy, literary dish based on her friendship with Elizabeth David and her acquaintance with many of the characters in Elizabeth David's life.

Elizabeth David is one of my favourite writers on food. I use her recipes often and feel a kind of kinship with her. Her life was nothing if not adventurous, but she was often unlucky (and unwise) in love, and she experienced prolonged periods of unhappiness.

In her maturity, she was an authoritative, not say formidable, presence who could make restaurateurs quail. Maddeningly opinionated, she laid down the culinary law, especially as regarded dishes she claimed as her own.

Compared to the flexibility and inventiveness of modern cookery writers, Elizabeth David's recipes now seem old-fashioned; but she was from a different era -- and that is what makes her so fascinating. She practically invented modern British cookery. God bless her.

kewdiepie
`Writing at the Kitchen Table' is the `Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David' by Artemis Cooper. Biographer Cooper, by great sympathy with his subject, with access to great sources, and by superior narrative has given us a superior biography of one of the three great female English language culinary writers of the twentieth century.

It is revealing to compare the lives and careers of Ms. David with the other two greats, Julia Child and M.F.K. Fisher. She stands roughly between Child, the great teacher and Fisher, the great gourmand and explorer of appetites. Her recipe writing was less pedagogical and more analytical than Child, and less subjective but more attentive to details of other peoples works than Fisher.

In their personal lives, it is interesting to see that while David and Fisher were certifiably beautiful women through much of their lives, their success with husbands was poor to dismal by the standards of their day and ours. In contrast, the very tall and warbly voiced Julia Child was attractive by the same standards one may have used with Eleanor Roosevelt, yet her family life with husband, Paul Child was one of the world's great enduring love stories.

A fascinating parallel with Child and David is that they both served in their country's intelligence organizations overseas during World War II. While Child was with the OSS in India and Burma, David was with British Intelligence in Cairo, where she landed at the beginning of the war after a literally hair raising flight from the Italians and Germans in 1940, across the Mediterranean just as the Germans were invading Greece. Also, Ms. Child and Ms. David both met their future husbands during the war.

One small problem I have with the biographies of both Ms. David and Ms. Fisher is that neither does a really good job of identify the spark that ignited their interest in food. Unlike these two, Julia Child's epiphany is obvious when she found herself with a husband who liked to eat well, and she did not really know how to cook. Necessity took over and Julia dove into the subject with what became a lifelong passion.

With Elizabeth David, the interest seems to creep up on her as a result of really dismal food in her nursery as a child, followed by the revelation of very good food while living and studying in Paris and Munich. While Ms. Fisher started writing before World War II, Ms. Child and Ms. David both started their careers around 1950, although Ms. David was first published `Mediterranean Food' seven years before Julia Child et al's `Mastering the Art of French Cooking'. In fact, by 1962, after publishing `French Provincial Food' and `Italian Food', Ms. David was quite the authority compared to newcomer Child.

This is another interesting parallel in that the most famous works from all three authors came early in their careers. While Ms. Fisher's greatest fame came in the 1960's, it was largely based on reissues of works she did in the 1940s. And, neither Ms. Child nor Ms. David ever topped the popularity of the works in their first five years.

Oddly, Elizabeth David's very best work of scholarship was probably published near the end of her career, and it is probably her least known major work. This is `English Bread and Yeast Cookery', which lead to her achieving her highest official recognition's from the Crown and from English intellectual society. What is surprising is that this great scholarly work may have as much in common with Rachael Carson's `Silent Spring' as it does with Peter Reinhart's books on bread baking. Along with great information on home and commercial practice, it was a revelation of how poor English commercial bread baking could be.

In addition to her unfortunate romantic live and her James Bondean experiences at the opening of World War II, Ms. David's life in general seems to have been less happy than that of Ms. Fisher and far less happy than the `too good to be believed' life of Ms. Child. Ms. David's father died young and her mother did not have a great deal of interest in her four daughters. Early in life, Elizabeth made up for her family's alienation by living beyond her means, with the knowledge that her family's estate would bail her out of her debts.

Her relations with her family and many friends seemed to be perpetually bumpy. Elizabeth could be both very reserved and very prickly, with a blindness to seeing the other point of view in a lot of cases, leading to more than one very long term alienation from former friends. She was, for example, very difficult to interview and had a great aversion to seeing her name in print in contexts other than as author of her own works.

Her business dealings tended to the difficult as well, although not entirely through her doing. Her relations with publishers of books and magazines seemed to be especially difficult, leading to serious legal entanglements. Her problems with the cookware store, `Elizabeth David, LTD', of which she was just one of five shareholders were largely her own doing, as she ignored good business sense and ran things largely to suit her personal tastes. Then, she took serious offense when her business partners brought in a manager with good marketing skills.

While Elizabeth David's influence was not great in the United States, it did have a great effect on the general direction of American cuisine in her friendship with American expatriate, Richard Olney and their joint influence on Chez Panisse movers and shakers, Alice Waters and Jeremiah Tower, plus the tiny San Francisco eatery, Zuni Café, soon to be the second best known San Francisco eatery, after Panisse.

This book was more enjoyable to read than the recent Fisher biography, `Poet of the Appetites', but not quite as much fun as the Child biography, `Appetite for Life'.

If you consider yourself a card-carrying foodie, you should read this book.

spark
Having previous knowledge of the subject (such as Lisa Chaney's earlier book) and having met many of the people mentioned in this new biography I was very thrilled to have previous gaps in my knowledge filled.

Elizabeth David's life if quite fully covered in all its many and various aspects, incidental to the main culinary aspects. She lived in the ever changing periods from Edwardian England to the late twentieth century. The book brings to life what it was like to live through those changes and will be helpful to future historians studying the last century. Great fun and easy to read.

Tto
Loved it. Artemis cooper is a brilliant biographer This is my second book by her.

Dalallador
Tedious

Nagis
When friends and relatives and acquaintances gathered together Sept. 10, 1992 to memorialize Elizabeth David, they shared bottles of Macon Prisse 1991 and Morgan Chateau Gaillard 1991, as well as conversation. Artemis Cooper, author of `WRITING AT THE KITCHEN TABLE: THE AUTHORIZED BIOGRAPHY OF ELIZABETH DAVID suggests David would have approved. In the space of several decades, David had revolutionized cooking and meal preparation in Britain and introduced the British to really fine wines. Like her counterpart in America-Julia Child-David had no idea she would cause such a stir when she began to write articles about French, Italian, and other Mediterranean cuisines after WWII. David's notion that one could cook and eat other people's food-a multiethnic moment if there ever was one-was downright avant garde in the 1950s.
Cooper covers David's (nee Elizabeth Gwynne) life from her early days on the family estate in Wales, through WWII when she worked for the British in Egypt, to her amazing career as an author of books on food and food preparation. Before, during, and after WWI, David lived in Italy, the Levant, Egypt, and India where she learned how to make many local dishes and to appreciate "home grown" foods we call organic today. When Ms. David began to write about her dishes on her kitchen table, rationing was in still in force in Britain. Nevertheless, her first book on French country cooking was a hit. She then went on to write a number of books and many articles focused on what various people grow, cook, and eat.
Elizabeth David certainly lived in interesting times. A most intriguing aspect of Cooper's biography is her skillful placement of David within her age, a period during which the social mores of the UK changed somewhat dramatically. David had many interesting friends, including the writers Lawrence Durrell and Norman Douglas. Her book agent was Paul Scott, author of the RAJ QUARTET, and Olivia Manning, who wrote the Balkan and Levant trilogies known collectively as THE FORTUNES OF WAR was a friend from her days in Egypt. If you enjoy biographies as social history, I recommend ELIZABETH DAVID.

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