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Road from ar Ramadi: The Private Rebellion of Staff Sergeant Mejia: An Iraq War Memoir epub ebook

by Camilo Mejía

Road from ar Ramadi: The Private Rebellion of Staff Sergeant Mejia: An Iraq War Memoir epub ebook

Author: Camilo Mejía
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: Haymarket Books (March 1, 2008)
Pages: 320 pages
ISBN: 1931859531
ISBN13: 978-1931859530
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 265
Other formats: lrf doc txt lrf


Mejia gradually became aware of Iraqis' desire that the occupation end, but he believed it would end very quickly.

Mejia, who now works on domestic civil rights issues in Miami while remaining part of the antiwar movement (another rarity), is a co-convenor of the VFP convention. In October 2003, Mejia was the first . soldier to publicly refuse to fight in Iraq. Mejia gradually became aware of Iraqis' desire that the occupation end, but he believed it would end very quickly. During an Iraqi protest, a young Iraqi man was about to toss a grenade, and Mejia aimed and fired - as did others around him.

Xxvi, 300 pages ; 21 cm. Recounts Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejia's experiences as the first publicly known conscientious objector to the Iraq war, exploring how he became a symbol of the antiwar movement in 2004 and choose to go to jail rather than. Recounts Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejia's experiences as the first publicly known conscientious objector to the Iraq war, exploring how he became a symbol of the antiwar movement in 2004 and choose to go to jail rather than fight in a war he did not believe in. Includes bibliographical references (page 300).

Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejía became the new face of the antiwar movement when he applied for discharge from the army as a conscientious objector

Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejía became the new face of the antiwar movement when he applied for discharge from the army as a conscientious objector. After serving in the army for nearly nine years, he was the first known Iraq veteran to refuse to fight, citing moral concerns about the war and the US occupation. His principled stand helped rally the growing oppositio Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejía became the new face of the antiwar movement when he applied for discharge from the army as a conscientious objector

Mejía has recently written a book entitled Road from Ar Ramadi: The Private Rebellion of Staff Sergeant Mejía which recounts his journey of conscience in Iraq.

Mejía has recently written a book entitled Road from Ar Ramadi: The Private Rebellion of Staff Sergeant Mejía which recounts his journey of conscience in Iraq. Mejía is interviewed in "The Ground Truth: After the Killing Ends (2006)", a documentary about the training and alleged dehumanization of . soldiers, and how they struggle to come to terms with it when they come back home.

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Staff Sergeant Camilo MejÃa became the new face of the antiwar movement when he applied for .

Staff Sergeant Camilo MejÃa became the new face of the antiwar movement when he applied for discharge from the army as a conscientious objector. In this stirring book, he argues passionately for the end to an unjust war. AsNew York Times columnist Bob Herbert writes, "The issues has raised deserve a close reading by the nation as a whole. His principled stand helped rally the growing opposition and embolden other soldiers. Mejía was eventually convicted of desertion by a military court and sentenced to a year in prison, prompting Amnesty International to declare him a prisoner of conscience.

Road from Ar Mamadi: The Private Rebellion of Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejia" tells this story as a veteran of. .

Road from Ar Mamadi: The Private Rebellion of Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejia" tells this story as a veteran of the war has enough of it, and requests discharge - only to be marked as a deserter and imprisoned. Now free, Mejia tells his story and urges Americans to support an end to what he calls an unjust war in Iraq. There is nothing simple in this book; nothing simple about the situations that Staff Sergeant Mejía faced in Iraq, nothing simple in the moral decisions he was forced to make, and nothing simple about the way that he eventually came those decisions.

After prison Mejia became active in the anti-war movement with IVAW and has authored a book on his experiences titled "Road from ar Ramadi: The Private Rebellion of Staff Sergeant Mejía".

In 2006, a Zogby poll revealed that 72% of soldiers who served in Iraq favored withdrawal within one year. The Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW), founded in 2004 by a handful of veterans, now boasts over 1,200 members. While there is no shortage of polemics in Mejia’s writing, he is also thoughtful and reflective. Mejia’s first-hand experience with the war enhances our understanding of the treatment of enemy combatants, the imperial nature of the war, and what he considers a popular uprising in Iraq.

Staff Sergeant Camilo Mejía became the new face of the antiwar movement when he applied for discharge from the army as a conscientious objector.

After serving in the army for nearly nine years, he was the first known Iraq veteran to refuse to fight, citing moral concerns about the war and the US occupation. His principled stand helped rally the growing opposition and embolden other soldiers.

Mejía was eventually convicted of desertion by a military court and sentenced to a year in prison, prompting Amnesty International to declare him a prisoner of conscience. Here Mejía tells his own story, from his upbringing in Central America to his service in Iraq—where he witnessed prisoner abuse—to his struggle today to end the occupation there.

In this stirring book, he argues passionately for the end to an unjust war. As New York Times columnist Bob Herbert writes, “The issues [Mejía] has raised deserve a close reading by the nation as a whole. . . . He has made a contribution to the truth about Iraq.”

Includes a new afterword by the author.

Camilo Mejía grew up in Nicaragua and Costa Rica before moving to the United States in 1994. He joined the military at age nineteen, serving as an infantryman in the active-duty army for three years before transferring to the Florida National Guard. He fought in Iraq for five months. He lives in Miami.

Reviews (7)
Legionstatic
One of those books you can't put down. This book reads so well and opens your eyes to so many aspects of the life of an amazing man. So grateful to have read this book, so grateful to have Sergeant Mejia write out this story of his life.

Vizil
Very important reading--especially for those thinking of serving in the Middle East or who have family members considering going there. Also, a good read for vets and for those who question war being the answer.

Phallozs Dwarfs
One of the most inspiring events thus far at the Veterans For Peace National Convention underway in Miami was a presentation on Thursday by several veterans who have refused to participate in war. Typically, they have done this at the risk of significant time in prison, or worse. In most cases these resisters avoided doing any time. Even when they did go behind bars, they did so with a feeling of liberation.

Gerry Condon refused to deploy to Vietnam, was sentenced to 10 years in prison, escaped from Fort Bragg, left the country, and came back campaigning for amnesty. President Jimmy Carter pardoned resisters as his first act in office. Condon never "served" a day, in either the military "service" or prison.

Jeff Paterson of Courage to Resist refused to fly to Iraq, choosing instead to sit down on the tarmac. Ben Griffin from VFP's new chapter in the U.K. refused to participate in our nations' wars and has been issued a gag order. He's not permitted to speak, and yet he speaks so well. Mike Prysner of March Forward and Camilo Mejia of VFP here in Miami described their acts of resistance.

Mejia did us all the enormous favor some years back of putting his story down in a book -- an extreme rarity, sadly, for peace activists with great stories to tell. Mejia's book "Road From Ar Ramadi" is a terrific introduction for anyone wondering why someone would sign up for the military and then refuse to kill people. Mejia, who now works on domestic civil rights issues in Miami while remaining part of the antiwar movement (another rarity), is a co-convenor of the VFP convention.

In October 2003, Mejia was the first U.S. soldier to publicly refuse to fight in Iraq. At that time only 22 members of the U.S. military had gone AWOL from that war, a number that would quickly climb into the thousands as the war worsened and as belief in the various rationales offered for the war evaporated. Soldiers also began to refuse particular missions that would be likely to kill civilians or to put themselves at risk for no purpose other than the advancement of a commander's career -- a commander safely giving orders from a base. Veterans of the Iraq War would soon work with Veterans For Peace to form a new organization, Iraq Veterans Against the War. But at the time of Mejia's refusal to fight he stood virtually alone.

Mejia joined the military largely for the very same reason most Americans do: the lack of other options. He had worked his way through high school and community college. But the government cut off his financial aid, and he couldn't afford the college bills. The Army offered him college tuition and financial security. That was enough. This son of Sandinista revolutionaries headed off to Fort Benning, the home of the School of the Americas, where he would train to kill for U.S. empire.

Mejia learned to dislike the military. His commitment was due to end in May 2003. But in January 2003, the Florida National Guard shipped off to begin the invasion of Iraq that President Bush was publicly pretending to try to avoid and privately concocting harebrained schemes to get started. Mejia's contract was extended to 2031 (not a typo), and he was sent to Jordan. He was neither for nor against the military or the war in any simple sense. He was aware of the massive peace demonstrations around the world. He disliked many things about the military and about this particular war, which he believed was a war for oil. But he was loyal and obedient, not yet convinced of the extreme immorality of the operation in which he was playing a part.

Mejia's first experience in Iraq involved the abuse of prisoners. He disliked these practices but did not resist. Mentally he tried to brush them aside as the work of "a few bad apples." Or he tried to justify doing what he was doing out of loyalty to the soldiers around him.

Mejia gradually became aware of Iraqis' desire that the occupation end, but he believed it would end very quickly. During an Iraqi protest, a young Iraqi man was about to toss a grenade, and Mejia aimed and fired -- as did others around him. The young man died instantly, but the trouble the incident aroused in Mejia's soul did not.

Mejia was troubled by his fellow soldiers' racist hatred of all Iraqis. Innocent Iraqis were imprisoned and interrogated, when they weren't shot. Their dead bodies were mistreated by joking soldiers snapping photos with their prize pieces of flesh. "It occurred to me," Mejia writes of some Iraqis who observed such actions, "how upsetting it must have been for them to see their relative in the dirt, half naked and covered in blood, being laughed at and humiliated even in death."

The beginnings of resistance among the troops arose out of their growing awareness that their commanders were using them in a competition for the most fire fights, the most kills, and the most prisoners. The needs of this competition outweighed justice or even strategy. Returning to base with innocent prisoners was far preferable to returning empty-handed. There was no grander goal driving any operations, as far as the soldiers could see. They went on patrols the entire purpose of which was to guard themselves as they patrolled.

As Iraqi resistance grew, so did U.S. fear, to the point where troops would fire even on unarmed children if the soldiers couldn't be certain that the children posed no danger. Mejia understood both points of view, and came to realize that in war the choices are bad or horrendous. The only good choice, he began to see, is to not cooperate with war at all.

At one point Mejia tried to explain to some Iraqis something he barely believed any longer himself, that the war was aimed at bringing "freedom" to the people of Iraq. One of the Iraqis who knew something about Mejia's situation pointed out that Mejia wished to leave the military and could not. "So how," this Iraqi asked, "can you bring freedom to us, when you don't have freedom for yourselves?" When Mejia took part in raids of Iraqi houses, he viewed the terror the Iraqis showed of U.S. capture and "detention" as misguided. Surely prisoners would all be fairly tried and released if innocent, he told himself. "As it turned out," Mejia admits, "the families . . . knew my own army much better than I did."

Yet the troops that left the bases knew more than the commanders who didn't. The latter, falsely believing that resistance was coming from outside the local area, ordered all the wrong roads blockaded to no purpose. The soldiers who knew such decisions were wrong dared not say anything for fear of what challenging a "superior" can do to your career.

Mejia was able to return to the United States for two weeks' leave. He went AWOL with assistance from peace groups, and turned himself in to face possible imprisonment. He'd "served" more than the eight years he'd agreed to. And he believed the war was killing human beings for no useful purpose whatsoever.

A mockery of a charade of a pretense of a trial convicted Mejia and sentenced him to 1 year in jail. "That day," as he went to jail, Mejia recalls, "I was free, in a way I had never been before."

olgasmile
The book is a personal, emotional revelation of someone who has suffered from his experiences. I can respect that but the overall issue is much greater than Mejia as an individual.
Mejia says he was accused of deserting his comrades in arms by not returning to Iraq but his most salient defense is left out. He reports in sometimes boring detail how he and his men were used to provoke attacks in order for their superior officers to earn combat experience medals; therefore his refusal to return to a shooting gallery was not cowardly but indeed heroic. He was not running away from a fight and leaving his mates to fend for themselves indeed he was running off to get help for his fellow soldiers. In a firefight if a soldier decides it's best to flee and get help wouldn't that be the best idea rather than die w/ his platoon? Mejia was calling attention to the poor treatment of his fellow soldiers.
Mejia had served most of his commitment before the war broke out then he discovered a sneaky provision where enlistees can be called back to duty with their initial enrollment actually 8 years not the 4 years they thought it was. In fact Mejia was told b/c he enrolled in 2003 (?) and the Iraq war broke out he could be forced to serve until the year 2031!
Does anyone think that is reasonable? Essentially that is a death sentence "You will be sent into combat until you are dead or until the year 2031 whichever comes first".
Some people think soldiers must do what they are told and not question orders. Mejia describes the torture of prisoners suspected of being active fighters. Sleep deprivation and forcing them to stand or walk until they collapse is not what young poor folks have in mind when they sign up for the military.
Sure, the military can pay for college and young men love the warrior image but that doesn't justify our govt using our young men to brutalize a foreign country.
Stop the foreign wars for foreign oil. Let's use natural gas powered cars, drill for oil of the Calif shore, maybe nuclear energy, solar energy and wool sweaters in the winter; sounds crazy?
Not as crazy as sending a million man (and woman) army to the other side of the planet and destroying societies and ultimately destroying the souls of our young soldiers. Think about that.

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