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Memoris, Biographies

Infantry Attacks epub ebook

by Erwin Rommel

Infantry Attacks epub ebook

Author: Erwin Rommel
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: Greenhill Books (August 29, 2006)
Pages: 256 pages
ISBN: 1853677078
ISBN13: 978-1853677076
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 614
Other formats: mobi azw lrf docx


Infantry Attacks book.

Infantry Attacks book.

The book is written primarily as an instructional manual, drawing lessons from the detailed small unit actions Rommel describes. In passing, it also burnishes Rommel’s reputation (which grew in interwar Germany in part due to this book), even though Rommel not infrequently criticizes his own performance. Finally, the book serves as a platform for Rommel’s thoughts on what constitutes an honorable German soldier, which are pretty much as you’d expect for the time and place.

Infantry Attacks (German: Infanterie greift an) is a classic book on military tactics written by Erwin Rommel about his experiences in World War I. At the time of the book's writing in the mid-1930s. At the time of the book's writing in the mid-1930s, Rommel's rank was lieutenant colonel. Rommel had planned to write a successor called Panzer greift an (in English: Tanks Attack) about tank warfare, and gathered much material during the North Africa Campaign. However, he was forced to commit suicide before completing this work.

by. Rommel, Erwin, 1891-1944. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. European history: Second World War, Military tactics, Military - World War II, History, Biography, Autobiography, Germany, Military, History, Military, World War I, 1891-1944, Rommel, Erwin,, Rommel, Erwin, 1891-1944, World War (1914-1918), World War, 1914-1918, Infantry drill and tactics, Military campaigns. London : Greenhill ; MBI : St. Paul. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 20, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Field Marshal Erwin Rommel exerted an almost hypnotic influence not only over his own troops but also over the Allied soldiers of the Eighth Army in the Second World Wa. Infantry Attacks - Erwin Rommel.

Field Marshal Erwin Rommel exerted an almost hypnotic influence not only over his own troops but also over the Allied soldiers of the Eighth Army in the Second World War. Even when the legend surrounding his invincibility was overturned at El Alamein, the aura surrounding Rommel himself remained unsullied. In this classic study of the art of war Rommel analyses the tactics that lay behind his success. Part one: the war of movement, belgium and northern france, 1914. Even when the legend surrounding his invincibility was overturned at El Alamein, the aura surrounding Rommel. First published in 1937 it quickly became a highly regarded military textbook, and also brought its author to the attention of Adolph Hitler. Rommel was to subsequently advance through the ranks.

Frontline Books, 20 февр

Frontline Books, 20 февр. Field Marshal Erwin Rommel exerted an almost hypnotic influence not only over his own troops but also over the Allied soldiers of the Eighth Army in the Second World War. In this classic study of the art of war Rommel analyses the tactics that lay behind his success

Опубликовано: 7 нояб.

Опубликовано: 7 нояб. 2018 г. Infantry Attacks by Erwin Rommel Chapter 3. Категория. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически. Военный боевик! Шпионы, разведчики, десант! Мощное Кино. Лисья Нора - Продолжительность: 3:06:56 КиноМУР Recommended for you.

Johannes Erwin Eugen Rommel (15 November 1891 – 14 October 1944) was a German general and military theorist. Popularly known as the Desert Fox, he served as field marshal in the Wehrmacht (Defense Force) of Nazi Germany during World War II, as well as serving in the Reichswehr of the Weimar Republic, and the army of Imperial Germany. Rommel was a highly decorated officer in World War I and was awarded the Pour le Mérite for his actions on the Italian Front

Field Marshal Erwin Rommel exerted an almost hypnotic influence not only over his own troops but also over the Allied soldiers of the Eighth Army in the Second World War. Even when the legend surrounding his invincibility was overturned at El Alamein, the aura surrounding Rommel himself remained unsullied. As a leader of a small unit in the First World War, he proved himself an aggressive and versatile commander, with a reputation for using the battleground terrain to his own advantage, for gathering intelligence, and for seeking out and exploiting enemy weaknesses. Rommel graphically describes his own achievements, and those of his units, in the swift-moving battles on the Western Front, in the ensuing trench warfare, in the 1917 campaign in Romania, and in the pursuit across the Tagliamento and Piave rivers. This classic account seeks out the basis of his astonishing leadership skills, providing an indispensable guide to the art of war written by one of its greatest exponents.
Reviews (7)
Ghile
Most people have heard of Erwin Rommel, at least in passing. But most people probably associate his name with only two events: World War Two tank battles in North Africa, and Rommel’s forced suicide by Hitler because of his ancillary association with Stauffenberg’s attempt to assassinate Hitler. And most people probably have a general sense that Rommel was not so bad a guy, relative to the Nazi regime as a whole (as low a bar as that may be). This book contradicts none of that, but provides a broader sense both of who Rommel was, and also provides a different perspective on World War One than we commonly have.

Infantry Attacks is basically a war travelogue. It is an autobiography not of war anguish, but of war practice. Informally written, it features Rommel leading small units, usually involving fast action against other small units. We typically associate World War One with Western Front trench warfare, and although Rommel did fight there and records it, much of the book is concerned with other fronts.

The first other front is the Carpathian border between Rumania and Hungary. (Well, what was then the border, before Transylvania was taken by the victorious Allies from Hungary, of which Transylvania had been a part for more than a thousand years, and given to the Rumanians to reward them for finally entering the war in 1916, when they figured out who was winning the war. Then the Rumanians also switched sides to gain advantage in World War Two.). The second is mountain warfare on the Austrian/Italian front, including the Battle of Caporetto, where Rommel won the Pour le Mérite, Germany’s highest military honor (informally called the Blue Max. and jarringly formally named in French, for historical reasons).

The book is written primarily as an instructional manual, drawing lessons from the detailed small unit actions Rommel describes. In passing, it also burnishes Rommel’s reputation (which grew in interwar Germany in part due to this book), even though Rommel not infrequently criticizes his own performance. Finally, the book serves as a platform for Rommel’s thoughts on what constitutes an honorable German soldier, which are pretty much as you’d expect for the time and place.

What strikes the modern reader most about the book is that it has a very different view of World War One fighting than we are used to. Most of the time, we think of World War One as unrelieved horror to no point, led by clueless generals and political leaders, featuring such low points as endless static trench fighting, Verdun, poison gas, and Gallipoli. Rommel enjoyed war, and he was good at it, and it shows continuously in the book. He frequently mentions how “exciting” a particular fight is, often in reference to “grenade duels.” He doesn’t spend any time at all navel gazing or reflecting on what lessons about human nature are being taught.

His men apparently worshipped him (although that is only obliquely evident in the book). One gets the impression, though, that was not due to his common touch, which is nowhere in evidence, but to his demi-godlike stature as a man who led from the front and was able to minimize his men’s casualties. As he says, “Winning the men’s confidence requires much of a commander. . . . . But once he has their confidence, his men will follow him through hell and high water.” Sounds easy, but reading the book you can see the things he did to really put that into practice successfully. (Someone would doubtless have written a book on applying the lessons of Rommel to business, if not for the unfortunate Nazi overtones that such a book would generate.)

We may think it’s odd, but we should remember that history and armies are full of examples of people who actually don’t mind, or actually positively enjoy, war, who nonetheless aren’t psychopaths or insane. It’s not just generals standing back from the battlefield, either—it’s just as much people like Rommel, engaged in “retail” war, who enjoy it.

Infantry Attacks can feel repetitive, particularly for a reader who doesn’t know the relevant geography or military tactics in detail. I’m sure for a military practitioner, each skirmish and battle in which Rommel describes his and his men’s part in detail, complete with Rommel’s hand drawn maps and sketches, teaches its own valuable lessons. But even for a causal or non-military leader, there is a lot of value in reading the book. It gives an invaluable flavor of the time and the war, very different from what normally receive, and is therefore very much worth reading.

Trash Obsession
I found this book to be a very interesting read, particularly as we move through the 100 year anniversaries of some of the battles mentioned. The binding of my copy is excellent, the print is dark and clear. The subject matter is a discussion of actions personally commanded by the author in the format of battle reports with lessons learned. This book was written to be studied by future generations of infantry commanders and provides insight into the mind of the man himself. All in all a very splendid purchase.

Angana
5 Stars...with a comment: This is Rommel at his objective best...very dry, very analytical. His diagrams are as entertaining as the descriptions of his small unit narratives. By a truth, this is a great tacticians study guide. It is a leadership example of the best way to manage a platoon or company sized unit. And, it is from the very hand of Rommel. Some say Rommel was luckier than professional. After reading this, you will see a man of unlimited courage, extreme capacity to stay focused in the heat of battle and a man capable of explaining it all after the action in great detail. If you really want to learn what small unit commanders should be doing and paying attention to in battle, read this book.

HappyLove
This is an account of the small-unit infantry engagements in which Rommel and his units were principle forces during WW I. The lessons Rommel drew from these experiences directly influenced his fighting in WW II, particularly his constant reconnaissance, either personally or by designated groups. Rommel's successes often came from his intimate knowledge of the geography of his fights and, often, the precise disposition of his enemies.

Bev
Through the questions he asked himself on battlefield, and his after action observations, you get a quick idea of how his thought process works. Also, may help explain how he achieved his early WW2 success.

Zulkigis
I'm not sure about this one, but a lot of "infantry Attacks" are just reprints of the hastily translated version with parts missing and sections cut that might embarrass the Allies, printed in 1944.
"Attacks" published by Athena press went back and translated the original book and isn't missing any maps or drawings, it is also a lot better laid out.
It is called 'Attacks' and not 'Infantry Attacks' and is also available on Amazon.

But review wise on 'Attacks' that i am reading right now, Five Starts and a half. Rommel inspires me and it is a great read.

Moswyn
265 pages that are packed with knowledgeable insights. Of course Rommel requires no introduction, his WWII exploits are well known. This book is a summation of his involvement in the learning of warfare, phase of his life in WWI. The events are clearly laid out for the reader to visualize. His hand made sketches accompany the text and most interesting is his after action analysis of an event and the lessons learned from it. Through his hand in this book you can see the WWII Rommel developing. His command learning, his actions show the daring, opportunity exploiting, deceptions, courage, excellent use of the local physical surroundings - he almost always found a way through or around an enemy position. He even learned by the mistakes he had made. The close combat scenes he relates add an additional flavor to the understanding of the infantryman's everyday plite.
These are lessions that would have been useful from the American civil war through to today.

good read, very interesting to see the insight. This is the battle experiences from Rommel from WW1 NOT WW2, Very interesting. It is his personal recounting of his experiences, with notes of his lessons learned from each section. engagement. It was a relatively engaging read. I plan on buying this book Attacks as it is supposed to be a much better and more complete translation. If I had to buy 1 i would buy attacks

Over all I would recommend buying Attacks, rather than this book

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