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Slavemaster President: The Double Career of James Polk epub ebook

by William Dusinberre

Slavemaster President: The Double Career of James Polk epub ebook

Author: William Dusinberre
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 27, 2003)
Pages: 272 pages
ISBN: 0195157354
ISBN13: 978-0195157352
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 889
Other formats: mbr mobi rtf lit


Dusinberre William (EN). James Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849, a time when slavery began to dominate American politics

Dusinberre William (EN). James Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849, a time when slavery began to dominate American politics. Polk's presidency coincided with the eruption of the territorial slavery issue, which within a few years would lead to the catastrophe of the Civil War. Polk himself owned substantial cotton plantations- in Tennessee and later in Mississippi- and some 50 slaves

Download PDF book format. Polk, James K. (James Knox), 1795-1849 Relations with slaves.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Slavemaster president : the double career of James Polk William Dusinberre. Book's title: Slavemaster president : the double career of James Polk William Dusinberre. Rubrics: Presidents United States Biography Plantation owners Tennessee Mississippi Slavery History 19th century. Download now Slavemaster president : the double career of James Polk William Dusinberre. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

At the core of the book is a meticulous reconstruction of James Knox Polk's cotton plantation.

James Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849, a time when .

James Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849, a time when slavery began to dominate American politics. In this excellent book, historian Dusinberre (Them Dark Days: Slavery in the American Rice Swamps) combines first-rate scholarship and a wealth of data to create a compelling narrative on the dual.

Home Browse Books Book details, Slavemaster President: The Double Career of James. James Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849, a time when slavery began to dominate American politics

Home Browse Books Book details, Slavemaster President: The Double Career of James. Slavemaster President: The Double Career of James Polk. By William Dusinberre. Polk himself owned substantial cotton plantations- in Tennessee and later in Mississippi- and some 50 slaves.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. 5% restored. Главная Slavemaster President: The Double Career of James Polk. Author: Dusinberre, William. Life at the Polk estate was brutal and often short.

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Slavemaster President book. James Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849, a time when slavery began to dominate American politics

Slavemaster President book. Polk himself owned substantial cotton plantations- in Tennessee and later in Mississippi- and some James Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849, a time when slavery began to dominate American politics.

James Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849, a time when slavery began to dominate American politics. Polk's presidency coincided with the eruption of the territorial slavery issue, which within a few years would lead to the catastrophe of the Civil War. Polk himself owned substantial cotton plantations-- in Tennessee and later in Mississippi-- and some 50 slaves. Unlike many antebellum planters who portrayed their involvement with slavery as a historical burden bestowed onto them by their ancestors, Polk entered the slave business of his own volition, for reasons principally of financial self-interest. Drawing on previously unexplored records, Slavemaster President recreates the world of Polk's plantation and the personal histories of his slaves, in what is arguably the most careful and vivid account to date of how slavery functioned on a single cotton plantation. Life at the Polk estate was brutal and often short. Fewer than one in two slave children lived to the age of fifteen, a child mortality rate even higher than that on the average plantation. A steady stream of slaves temporarily fled the plantation throughout Polk's tenure as absentee slavemaster. Yet Polk was in some respects an enlightened owner, instituting an unusual incentive plan for his slaves and granting extensive privileges to his most favored slave. Startlingly, Dusinberre shows how Polk sought to hide from public knowledge the fact that, while he was president, he was secretly buying as many slaves as his plantation revenues permitted. Shortly before his sudden death from cholera, the president quietly drafted a new will, in which he expressed the hope that his slaves might be freed--but only after he and his wife were both dead. The very next day, he authorized the purchase, in strictest secrecy, of six more very young slaves. By contrast with Senator John C. Calhoun, President Polk has been seen as a moderate Southern Democratic leader. But Dusinberre suggests that the president's political stance toward slavery-- influenced as it was by his deep personal involvement in the plantation system-- may actually have helped precipitate the Civil War that Polk sought to avoid.
Reviews (7)
shustrik
Slavery overhangs American political history and is full of contradictions and hypocrises. The book fails to look at the bigger issues and the complex challenges that slavery posed not only for Polk, but Jefferson, Lincoln (whose political hero Van Buren was a slave-owner, and Lincoln himself who famously wrote that the the Civil War was about preserving the Union and not about slavery). The list of Presidential slave owners (including Grant) is surprisingly large. The book is far too emotional in it's approach and contains hyperbole and suppostion. The only thing scholarly is the archival research undertaken that lays out Polk's slave trading and financial record. If History is about asking 'what happened and why' the book is a failure. The use of the highly emotional word 'Slavemaster' appears 95 times in the book. Dusinberre's approach is that he seems to have retrofitted data fit his biases and prejudices rather than to objectively analyse the times, circumstances and character of Polk. It's as if he set out to play "Gotcha." Don't waste your money.

Gorisar
All good!

Whatever
James Polk is usually the least familiar president to appear on historians' top 10 lists. But for William Dusinberre, Polk firmly holds a spot near the very bottom. For Dusinberre, Polk and his ideological brethren set the country on a course that unnecessarily led to the Civil War, the violent fall of the South, and the self-destruction of his own class.
Polk annexed Texas and was the instigator of the Mexican American War, which led to acquisition of most of the southwest for the United States. Polk also took the Oregon territory, which encompassed much of what is now the northwestern United States. Dusinberre suggests that there was a certain inevitability to some of this, but the way it all played out, and the final border results were far from certain. Polk's overly aggressive expansionism was, to Dusinberre the worst possible way for the country to stretch from sea to shinning sea because it infused militarism and obstinacy into the debate about the future of slavery.
Dusinberre convincingly argues that Polk's, and the Southern ruling classes' mores about slavery as a tool of social order, southern honor, and states rights were all subservient to the economic benefits reaped by slave owners such as Polk. This economic incentive was so great, that it blinded Polk to what Dusinberre believes to be the inevitable fall of slavery. A more forward-looking advocate of the Southern ruling class could have promoted a plan for a soft landing and perhaps sought alliances with moderates, rather than painting everyone who had any problems with slavery as extreme "abolitionists."
Polk's military adventurism, intolerance for even discussion of issues related to slavery, and insistence that slave owners' so-called rights should be expanded (or the South would lose its dominance in the Senate) was coupled by his implicit threat of secession in the event of almost any sort of compromise. Dusinberre argues that before Polk and his war, different gradations of opinion existed in the south, but afterward existed only unithought. The Civil War followed.
SLAVEMASTER PRESIDENT is not really a biography as much as it is a study of how slave ownership may have affected the ideology of pre-Civil War southern Democrats such as and including Polk, and how that ideology in turn contributed to the conditions that led to the Civil War. It is a compelling argument. Dusinberre also achieves a heart-rending description of slave life on the Polk plantation. The book achieves what it set out to do.
Still, I would have liked the book to be a bit more biographical. Dusinberre expains up front that his book "does not discuss Polk's role as a congressman in President Andrew Jackson's war against the Bank of the United States. Nor does it portray President Polk's part in securing the Tariff of 1846, nor his diplomacy with Britain, which led to the establishment of the northwestern boundary dividing the United States from Canada. These stories," explains Dusinberre, "have been told elsewhere." Maybe they have, but there is remarkably little popular literature on this influential, if wrongheaded president. I am satisfied with Dusinberre's book such that it is, but it also left me wanting to read more about Polk.

Brol
I'm not sure if I would have been better off reading a general bio on Polk first, becuase this book is very biased, as the author admits. The argument is that Polk's policy was stronly influenced by him being a slaveowner. That Polk had conflicting interests because he ran several plantations in Tn and Miss and he was using the money from the plantations to secure himself a post-presidential retirement.
The book is organized in an interesting way. It begins by describing Polk's plantations and what it was like for the slaves , plus gives details regarding the overseers,a nd Polk's policies regarding purchasing and selling of slaves. Polk endeavored to hide what he was doing from the general public and his reasons for selling and guying were definitley not always patriarchal, but monetary.
Polk died a few months after leaving office, and none or few of his papers were destroyed, hence we have a record of what ocurred on the plantations.
the second half of the book covers the main aspects of Polk's presidential career --annexation of Tx and the MX War. The author discusses the events through the lens of slavery and tried to argue Polk's descisions were heavily influenced by Polk being a slaveowner. the author presents many what-ifs, discussing a vairety of other scenarios that could have happened during Polk's presidency had he made other choices. I found these diversions to be a strength of the book instead of an irritant. The book gave me a lot to think about,a nd it was particulary interesting to learn the details of what Polk plantation life was like.

Геракл
I would most certainly award this poor excuse for a book with no stars, if only I could. Mr. Dusinberre is quite obviously a dirty race-baiter. Try and focus on the real achievements of James Polk, the man. Any one who isn't a complete moron will realize that he was the greatest cheif executive that this nation has ever had, and probably ever will have. The fulfillment of the annexation of Texas, the aquisition of the Oregan Territory, the aquisition of nearly all of the American west and southwest, the establishment of an independant national treasury, the lowering of tariffs, the establishment of the naval academy, the selection for the sites of both the Washington Monument and the Smithsonian, the signing the bill creating the Department of the Interior. And all of that in one four year term, as he'd pledged from the beginning. Let's not forget also that Polk was a micro-manager who worked on and carried out many of the duties of his cabinet, in addition to his own as President. Those are the facts one should focus on, Mr. Dusinberre. Not the dredging up of old issues. It's books like this that ruin what society is trying to do now...Patch up our differences and live together as what each and every one of us are...human beings.

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