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Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President epub ebook

by Paul Michael,Candice Millard

Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President epub ebook

Author: Paul Michael,Candice Millard
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Language: English
Publisher: Random House Audio; Unabridged edition (September 20, 2011)
ISBN: 0307939650
ISBN13: 978-0307939654
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 815
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In "The Destiny of the Republic," Candice Millard tells their stories with depth and verv. .Millard is masterful at capturing the zeitgeist of America during the 1880s, when President James Garfield was assassinated.

In "The Destiny of the Republic," Candice Millard tells their stories with depth and verv.but the result of her scholarship is decidedly unstuffy. The power of her narrative drives the reader from page to page as the tragic tale unfolds, and the portraits of the main players are created with a love for the relevant detail. Richmond Times Dispatch.

Home Candice Millard Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness .

Home Candice Millard Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President. Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President, .

After the initial shock of the president’s shooting, the prevailing feeling throughout the country was one of unfettered rage. Now the unthinkable had happened, and Arthur could become president at any moment. There were many who felt intensely dissatisfied that the indignant crowd in Washington was not permitted to wreak summary vengeance on the assassin of the President, one reporter wrote. The very idea caused hearts to sink and shoulders to shudder.

Moments later, Bell, who was still reciting the soliloquy, with no understanding of the effect it had had, suddenly heard the unmistakable sound of pounding feet

Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President, . Moments later, Bell, who was still reciting the soliloquy, with no understanding of the effect it had had, suddenly heard the unmistakable sound of pounding feet. Looking up, he saw the emperor of Brazil charging toward him, flush with excitement. In that moment, Bell’s life was transformed. To the rest of the world, he would no longer be a teacher, or even simply an inventor, but the creator of the telephone.

Destiny of the Republic book. Guiteau shot Garfield twice once in the arm and once in the back in the middle of a train station

Destiny of the Republic book. James A. Garfield was one of the most extraordinary men. Guiteau shot Garfield twice once in the arm and once in the back in the middle of a train station. After 80 days of battling for his life Garfield died not from the assassin's bullets, but from the abysmal care of his doctors. He died from an infection he acquired from his doctors poking their unsterilized fingers and equipment into his wounds.

Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President is a 2011 book by Candice Millard covering the life and assassination of James A. Garfield, the 20th President of the United States. Published by Doubleday (an imprint of Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, owned by Random House) on 20 September 2011, it later went on to win the Edgar Award for Best Fact Crime in 2012.

Destiny of the Republic:. has been added to your Cart. Millard digs deeply into the turmoil that got James A. Garfield elected, the lunacy that got him shot and the medical malfeasance that turned a minor wound into a mortal on. -Janet Maslin, Top 10 Recommendations for 2011.

That book proved popular with readers and critics alike, and Destiny of the Republic shows no signs of a sophomore jinx. For a country still beset by post-Reconstruction disunion, Garfield’s integrity and fairness helped to foster a more truly united United States. Garfield grew up dirt-poor in rural Ohio, lost his father before he had reached the age of two, and didn’t have a pair of shoes until he was four.

Nominated for president against his will, he engaged in a fierce battle with the corrupt political establishment. But the shot didn't kill Garfield. The drama of what happened subsequently is a powerful story of a nation in turmoil. But four months after his inauguration, a deranged office seeker tracked Garfield down and shot him in the back.

She lives in Kansas City with her husband and children. 5 5. What Our Readers Are Saying.

James A. Garfield was one of the most extraordinary men ever elected president. Born into abject poverty, he rose to become a wunderkind scholar, a Civil War hero, and a renowned and admired reformist congressman. Nominated for president against his will, he engaged in a fierce battle with the corrupt political establishment. But four months after his inauguration, a deranged office seeker tracked Garfield down and shot him in the back. But the shot didn’t kill Garfield. The drama of what hap­pened subsequently is a powerful story of a nation in tur­moil. The unhinged assassin’s half-delivered strike shattered the fragile national mood of a country so recently fractured by civil war, and left the wounded president as the object of a bitter behind-the-scenes struggle for power—over his administration, over the nation’s future, and, hauntingly, over his medical care. A team of physicians administered shockingly archaic treatments, to disastrous effect. As his con­dition worsened, Garfield received help: Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, worked around the clock to invent a new device capable of finding the bullet. Meticulously researched, epic in scope, and pulsating with an intimate human focus and high-velocity narrative drive, The Destiny of the Republic will stand alongside The Devil in the White City and The Professor and the Madman as a classic of narrative history.Total Run Time: 10 hours.
Reviews (7)
Nalmezar
James Garfield is most often remembered, if at all, as the president who was assassinated shortly after taking office. Destiny of the Republic brings the dead president back to life. This is not, however, a biography of Garfield. Rather, it is a stirring account of American life and politics during the time of the Garfield presidency, not long after the conclusion of the Civil War, and of a presidential murder. Garfield's early years are sketched out in cursory fashion, his (sometimes troubled) relationship with and eventual devotion to his wife Lucretia is covered in only a few pages, and the death of his youngest child receives little more than a mention. Rather than focusing on Garfield's personal life, Candice Millard devotes her attention to political divisions within the Republican Party (particularly Garfield's battles with New York Senator Roscoe Conkling and the vice president he controlled), as well as Garfield's frustration with the obligations of the office that he had little desire to hold.

The president's assassin is given nearly as much attention as the president. There are times when the book has the feel of a thriller, as the ominous Charles Guiteau weaves in and out of the text, inching himself closer to the president. Millard depicts Guiteau as a con man with delusions of grandeur whose madness was characterized by a growing belief that his plan to assassinate Garfield was divinely inspired.

The assassination occurs at the book's midway point. Millard then treats us to a different kind of political battle, a medical drama about doctors who vie for the opportunity to treat the president and who, ironically, become responsible for his death. Arrogant in their refusal to believe in the existence of germs, American doctors rejected evidence that antiseptic surgical conditions increase a patient's chance of survival. The dirty finger and unwashed probes inserted into Garfield's wound in search of a bullet sealed the president's fate, infecting an injury that Garfield would likely have survived if left untreated. The book concludes with an account of Garfield's autopsy and Guiteau's trial.

Destiny of the Republic succeeds on two levels. First, it is informative. Millard fills the text with interesting facts culled from a variety of primary and secondary source materials, including frequent quotations from contemporaneous news stories and Garfield's diary, to set the scene for Garfield's presidency. We learn enough about the man to understand that he would have made an admirable president. It's interesting to note that Garfield, despite his love of farming, was a scholar, a professor of literature and ancient languages, well versed in mathematics and keenly interested in science, the sort of man who, if running for office today, would likely be branded an "elitist." Garfield's speeches condemning slavery and the unequal treatment of black Americans are eloquent and moving; the book is worth reading for those passages alone.

Second, the book is entertaining. Millard's prose is lively. She captures personalities as if she were writing a novel. She seasons the narrative with humor and creates tension as the events leading to Garfield's encounter with Guiteau unfold. Despite its attention to detail, the narrative moves at a brisk pace.

My sole complaint concerns the attention that Millard gives to Alexander Graham Bell. Granted that Bell's life intersected with Garfield's more than once, and that Bell worked diligently to invent a device that would pinpoint the location of the bullet lodged in Garfield's body, the full chapter and parts of several others devoted to Bell's life seem out of place, as if Millard felt the need to pad her relatively short book with filler. I would have preferred a more thorough discussion of the political aftermath of the shooting. Millard tells us of its unifying effect on a nation that emerged from the Civil War still deeply divided, but provides few facts to support that proposition. A more extensive look at the impact of the assassination on the country would have been more germane than the pages devoted to Bell's life before and after his invention of the telephone.

That criticism aside, Destiny of the Republic is perfect for readers (like me) who want to know about a key moment in American history without being subjected to mind-numbing detail or leaden prose. Millard's book is enlightening and enjoyable. Garfield is a dead president I'm happy to have met.

Fearlesssinger
My wife and I both wanted to read this excellent history for a book club we belong to, so we obtained a copy on CD and listened to it on our recent 2,100 mile vacation to NC and VA. It is a must for American history buffs. Though I'm a recovering politician with a masters in history, I knew little about Garfield beyond the facts that he was a Union Civil War General, had been elected president as a Republican and was assassinated shortly after taking office. I came to respect and like the man through Millard's treatment. I was surprised to find that he had not sought the nomination, had been for Sen. John Sherman, and was nominated against his wishes when the GOP convention bolted to him on the 36th ballot. I was also impressed with the kind of man he was. And dismayed to discover that his wound should not have been fatal, that what killed him was the introduction of infection by his doctors, especially the chief I'm-in-charge-here Dr. Bliss, as they did not believe in Lister's germ theory. An interesting subtheme was the efforts of Alexander Graham Bell to invent a machine that would locate the bullet in Garfield's body. It worked, except that Dr. Bliss would only let Bell try the machine on Garfield's right side where he wrongly but strongly believed the bullet was lodged. Bell's machine went on to save many lives before x-Rays were developed. I previously enjoyed Millard's book "River of Doubt" and am looking forward to reading her "Hero of the Empire." She is a treasure for those of us who still care about history.

Robert A. Hall
Author: The Coming Collapse of the American Republic

Weetont
I first heard about this book on a PBS radio interview with the author. Candice Millard was a very interesting guest and her synopsis of her book about President Garfield was spell bounding. When I had the chance, I ordered the book from Amazon, but, didn't read it until a year later. I thought possibly that it was a "dark" depressing story about how President Garfield suffered after the assassination attempt and it would be kind of grueling to get through. 2014 wasn't a very good year for me and I wanted to read lighthearted stories with happy endings. Here it is September 2015 and the world for me is a bit brighter, so, I gave the book a try. How surprised I was to find that this story is compelling, full of actual facts, and very much like 3 biographies in one! If you are a fan of biographical history books, you will really enjoy this one. Candice Millard is a very fine author and describes in detail the story of how Garfield became president, how Alexander Graham Bell tried to help the President recover from his wounds with another of his inventions, and how the crazed lunatic assassin plotted to shoot the President. I didn't learn any of this in history class! The story certainly doesn't have a happy ending, but, it really made me think of the strides and progress in modern medicine that we take for granted today. If only Garfield were wounded today, he would not have succumbed to his injuries. I look forward to reading future writings by this author.

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