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Brain, Vision, Memory: Tales in the History of Neuroscience (A Bradford Book) epub ebook

by Charles G. Gross

Brain, Vision, Memory: Tales in the History of Neuroscience (A Bradford Book) epub ebook

Author: Charles G. Gross
Category: Medicine
Language: English
Publisher: A Bradford Book; 1 edition (July 26, 1999)
Pages: 273 pages
ISBN: 0262571358
ISBN13: 978-0262571357
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 380
Other formats: txt lrf lrf azw


Charles G. Gross is an experimental neuroscientist who specializes in brain mechanisms in vision. He is also fascinated by the history of his field

Charles G. He is also fascinated by the history of his field. In these tales describing the growth of knowledge about the brain from the early Egyptians and Greeks to the present time, he attempts to answer the question of how the discipline of neuroscience evolved into its modern incarnation through the twists and turns of history. The first essay tells the story of the visual cortex, from the first written mention of the brain by the Egyptians, to the philosophical and physiological studies by the Greeks,.

Gross's tales of the history of neuroscience can be warmly recommended to all students of the brain, but especially to those who believe that history began when they were undergraduates. Informative and amusing in equal part, Gross is as fair to those who were wildly wrong as to those who were (relatively) right. Never less than fascinating. -John C. Marshall, "Nature". Charlie Gross has written a fascinating set of essays, full of important historical knowledge, and enriched with colorful vignettes. His peice on the 'hippocampus minor;.

Charles G. In these engaging tales describing the growth of knowledge about the brain - from the early Egyptians and Greeks to the Dark Ages and the Renaissance to the present time - he attempts to answer the question of how the discipline of neuroscience evolved into its modern incarnation through the twists and turns of history.

Similar books and articles. What Brain Activity Tells Us About Conscious Awareness of Memory Retrieval. Charles G. Gross, A Hole in the Head: More Tales in the History of Neuroscience. Brain, Vision, Memory: Tales in the History of Neuroscience by Charles C. Gross. Louise Marshall - 1999 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 90:348-349. Emrah Duzel - 2000 - In Endel Tulving (e., Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Cambridge, MA and London: MIT Press, 2009.

book by Charles G. In these engaging tales describing the growth of knowledge about the brain-from the early Egyptians and Greeks to the Dark Ages and the Renaissance to the present time-Gross attempts to answer the question of how the discipline of neuroscience evolved into its modern incarnation through the twists and turns of history.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Brain, Vision, Memory: Tales in the History of Neuroscience. 0 Mb. Technology Transfer of Federally Funded R&D: Perspectives from a Forum. Mark Wang, David M. Adamson, Gabrielle Bloom, William Butz, Donna Fossum, Mihal Gross, Charles Kelle. John C. Marshall, Nature.

This book was devoted to neurological diseases, and discussed symptoms, as well as ideas from Galen and other Greek, Roman and . Gross, Charles G. (1999).

This book was devoted to neurological diseases, and discussed symptoms, as well as ideas from Galen and other Greek, Roman and Arabic authors. Thomas Willis in 1664, published his Anatomy of the Brain, followed by Cerebral Pathology in 1667. He removed the brain from the cranium, and was able to describe it more clearly, setting forth the circle of Willis – the circle of vessels that enables arterial supply of the brain.

Brain, Vision, Memory. Tales in the History of Neuroscience (Bradford Books). Published July 16, 1999 by The MIT Press. Neurosciences, In library, History.

In these engaging tales describing the growth of knowledge about the brain―from the early Egyptians and Greeks to the Dark Ages and the Renaissance to the present time―Gross attempts to answer the question of how the discipline of neuroscience evolved into its modern incarnation through the twists and turns of history.

Charles G. Gross is an experimental neuroscientist who specializes in brain mechanisms in vision. He is also fascinated by the history of his field. In these tales describing the growth of knowledge about the brain from the early Egyptians and Greeks to the present time, he attempts to answer the question of how the discipline of neuroscience evolved into its modern incarnation through the twists and turns of history.

The first essay tells the story of the visual cortex, from the first written mention of the brain by the Egyptians, to the philosophical and physiological studies by the Greeks, to the Dark Ages and the Renaissance, and finally, to the modern work of Hubel and Wiesel. The second essay focuses on Leonardo da Vinci's beautiful anatomical work on the brain and the eye: was Leonardo drawing the body observed, the body remembered, the body read about, or his own dissections? The third essay derives from the question of whether there can be a solely theoretical biology or biologist; it highlights the work of Emanuel Swedenborg, the eighteenth-century Swedish mystic who was two hundred years ahead of his time. The fourth essay entails a mystery: how did the largely ignored brain structure called the "hippocampus minor" come to be, and why was it so important in the controversies that swirled about Darwin's theories? The final essay describes the discovery of the visual functions of the temporal and parietal lobes. The author traces both developments to nineteenth-century observations of the effect of temporal and parietal lesions in monkeys―observations that were forgotten and subsequently rediscovered.

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