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Strange Weather: Culture, Science and Technology in the Age of Limits (Haymarket Series) epub ebook

by Andrew Ross

Strange Weather: Culture, Science and Technology in the Age of Limits (Haymarket Series) epub ebook

Author: Andrew Ross
Category: History & Philosophy
Language: English
Publisher: Verso (September 17, 1991)
Pages: 276 pages
ISBN: 0860915670
ISBN13: 978-0860915676
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 874
Other formats: txt docx lrf mbr


Arguing that science can only ever be understood as a social artifact, Strange Weather is a manifesto which calls on cultural critics to abandon their technophobia and contribute to the debates which shape our future

Arguing that science can only ever be understood as a social artifact, Strange Weather is a manifesto which calls on cultural critics to abandon their technophobia and contribute to the debates which shape our future. Each chapter focuses on an idea, a practice or community that has established an influential presence in our culture: New Age, computer hacking, cyberpunk, futurology, and global warming.

Strange Weather book. The most interesting aspect of this book, where arguments are made, primarily in the section on futurology and moreso meteorology, is the inability to distinguish between populist arguments and observations in 1990 and today. For instance, the climate change rhetoric, both for and against, are exactly the same, while the science on this issue has progressed.

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Weather : Culture, Science and Technology in the Age of Limits. Who speaks for science in a technologically dominated society? In his latest work of cultural criticism Andrew Ross contends that this question yields no simple or easy answer

Strange Weather : Culture, Science and Technology in the Age of Limits. Who speaks for science in a technologically dominated society? In his latest work of cultural criticism Andrew Ross contends that this question yields no simple or easy answer. In our present technoculture a wide variety of people, both inside and outside the scientific community, have become increasingly vocal in exercising their right to speak about, on behalf of, and often against, science and technology.

More by 'Andrew Ross'. You may also be interested in these fine selections.

Strange Weather Who speaks for science in a technologically dominated society? In his latest work of cultural criticism Andrew Ross contends that this question yields no simple or easy answer.

Download PDF book format. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 251-267) and index. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Strange weather : culture, science, and technology in the age of limits Andrew Ross. Book's title: Strange weather : culture, science, and technology in the age of limits Andrew Ross. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0860915670 (pb).

Strange Weather: Culture, Science and Technology in the Age of Limits (Haymarket Series). Andrew Ross has done a terrific job here, with this in depth fascinating study of the parameters of Popular Culture that touches on so many subjects it is impossible to describe.

Who speaks for science in a technologically dominated society? In his latest work of cultural criticism Andrew Ross contends that this question yields no simple or easy answer. In our present technoculture a wide variety of people, both inside and outside the scientific community, have become increasingly vocal in exercising their right to speak about, on behalf of, and often against, science and technology.Arguing that science can only ever be understood as a social artifact, Strange Weather is a manifesto which calls on cultural critics to abandon their technophobia and contribute to the debates which shape our future. Each chapter focuses on an idea, a practice or community that has established an influential presence in our culture: New Age, computer hacking, cyberpunk, futurology, and global warming.In a book brimming over with intelligence—both human and electronic—Ross examines the state of scientific countercultures in an age when the development of advanced information technologies coexists uneasily with ecological warnings about the perils of unchecked growth. Intended as a contribution to a “green” cultural criticism, Strange Weather is a provocative investigation of the ways in which science is shaping the popular imagination of today, and delimiting the possibilities of tomorrow.
Reviews (2)
Mustard Forgotten
Ross is a Scottish cultural critic and professor at NYU, a widely known member of the wave of postmodern thinkers who came along in the 1990s. In this book he takes on a variety of subjects, but does not provide the kind of overall examination of them that the title suggests. Rather, this reads like a collection of shorter essays on a few of the intersections of technology and culture. There are chapters on new age science, computer hackers, science fiction, and the evolving image of scientists and engineers.

Most of it is interesting to read, although at times he seems to be stretching too far in an attempt to make points. For example, his discussion of weather reporting as "culture" is not very convincing. Like a number of others, he seems interested in helping to create a new kind of criticism that emphasizes the position of culture(s) within the power structure of society.

Riavay
What an awful book this is.

Dana Phillips offers a great critique of Strange Weather and The Chicago Gangster Etcetera in his equally poor The Truth of Ecology. His evisceration of Ross's quasi-environmental urbanist solipsism is right on (and perhaps the only defensible moment in Phillips's work, which sadly and firmly lands in Ross's camp even while pulling tent spikes from it).

How do these people gain purchase in the academy? Strange Weather is full of straw man arguments, shoddy research, spurious logic, self-absorbed think pieces, and a crusade against New Ageism masquerading as a knowledgeable examination of environmental thought.

This book is an early product of the postructuralist assault on the material world that has come to pervade humanities studies, a burning cross on the field of interdisciplinarity. It also precipitated Ross's being revealed as a charlatan by Alan Sokal, and then Ross's profiteering from his own lack as a scholar by helping to grandstand the "Science Wars."

His current work on labor stands unfortunately on the foundation of low credibility he established for himself as in ideologue in the postmodern vein, his egotistical posturing from inside the cloisters of a university, and his quest to make of the raw material of the planet a curio cabinet for his own entertainment.

I recommend using this book as an example of how not to function as a writer of cultural criticism, and as a part of the problem we face in preserving what is left of the biosphere.

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