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Mapping Europe's Borderlands: Russian Cartography in the Age of Empire epub ebook

by Steven Seegel

Mapping Europe's Borderlands: Russian Cartography in the Age of Empire epub ebook

Author: Steven Seegel
Category: Earth Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (May 14, 2012)
Pages: 384 pages
ISBN: 0226744256
ISBN13: 978-0226744254
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 472
Other formats: lrf mbr lrf docx


For example, Seegel explains how Russia used cartography in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars and, later, formed its geography society as a cover for gathering intelligence. He also explains the importance of maps to the formation of identities and institutions in Poland, Ukraine, and Lithuania, as well as in Russia.

Notes Bibliography Index.

It is extensively illustrated. This book should appeal to a broader range of readers of the history of cartography because much of what it reveals about the mapping of Russia, East, and East Central Europe easily is applicable elsewhere in the modern world of empire.

The simplest purpose of a map is a rational one: to educate, to solve a problem, to point someone in the right direction

The simplest purpose of a map is a rational one: to educate, to solve a problem, to point someone in the right direction. Maps shape and communicate information, for the sake of improved orientation. But maps exist for states as well as individuals, and they need to be interpreted as expressions of power and knowledge, as Steven Seegel makes clear in his impressive and imp. The simplest purpose of a map is a rational one: to educate, to solve a problem, to point someone in the right direction.

Despite its merits, for a book allegedly about Russian cartography, what most strikes the Russian academic specialist is the author’s .

Despite its merits, for a book allegedly about Russian cartography, what most strikes the Russian academic specialist is the author’s somewhat oversimplified perspective on that country. Thus Peter the Great emerges as a kind of totalitarian avant le mot, with a secretive approach to maps and a determination to exercise absolute power at all costs.

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Critical cartography situates the practice of mapping within the power/ knowledge structures of competing . In tracing this desire and enterprise in cartography, Seegel pro- vides us with a genealogy of governmentality as shifting forms of groupist thought.

Critical cartography situates the practice of mapping within the power/ knowledge structures of competing states. Cartography is understood as part of what Michel Foucault termed governmentality, the development of techniques and technologies by modernizing states to render visible and manage subject peoples.

Similar books and articles. Seeking Control of the Peripheral WorldThe History of Cartography. J. B. Harley, David Woodward. Josef W. Konvitz - 1988 - Isis 79 (4):671-675. The History of Cartography and the History of ScienceMaps and Politics. Jeremy BlackTrading Territories: Mapping the Early Modern World. Jerry BrottonThe Mapping of North America: A List of Printed Maps, 1511-1670.

The simplest purpose of a map is a rational one: to educate, to solve a problem, to point someone in the right direction. Maps shape and communicate information, for the sake of improved orientation. But maps exist for states as well as individuals, and they need to be interpreted as expressions of power and knowledge, as Steven Seegel makes clear in his impressive and important new book.Mapping Europe’s Borderlands takes the familiar problems of state and nation building in eastern Europe and presents them through an entirely new prism, that of cartography and cartographers. Drawing from sources in eleven languages, including military, historical-pedagogical, and ethnographic maps, as well as geographic texts and related cartographic literature, Seegel explores the role of maps and mapmakers in the East Central European borderlands from the Enlightenment to the Treaty of Versailles. For example, Seegel explains how Russia used cartography in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars and, later, formed its geography society as a cover for gathering intelligence. He also explains the importance of maps to the formation of identities and institutions in Poland, Ukraine, and Lithuania, as well as in Russia. Seegel concludes with a consideration of the impact of cartographers’ regional and socioeconomic backgrounds, educations, families, career options, and available language choices. 

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