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Down by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religion (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity) epub ebook

by Larry Murphy

Down by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religion (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity) epub ebook

Author: Larry Murphy
Category: World
Language: English
Publisher: NYU Press (November 1, 2000)
Pages: 450 pages
ISBN: 0814755801
ISBN13: 978-0814755808
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 129
Other formats: docx mbr mobi doc


Series: Religion, Race, and Ethnicity.

Series: Religion, Race, and Ethnicity. Murphy, a professor of the History of Christianity at Northwestern, has put together a rich and varied collection of texts that go far beyond the & confines of African American religion being an exclusive province of the Protestant realm.

Murphy, Larry (Larry . Publication date. New York : New York University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 14, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Down by the Riverside book. Spanning the time of slavery up to the present, the volume moves beyond Protestant Christianity to address a broad diversity of African American religion from Conjure, Orisa, and Black Judaism to Islam, African American Catholicism, and humanism.

As African Americans, Native Americans, and many others adopted the religion as their own, Christianity could no longer be synonymous with whiteness. Yet, Gin Lum and Harvey note that the powerful confluence of Christianity, civilization and whiteness has fundamentally shaped American notions of religion and race (11). While this argument is maintained throughout the collection, it is especially prominent in the second half of the book, From Colonies to the Present

Larry Murphy (2000). Down by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religion (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity). Les Yoruba du Nouveau Monde: religion, ethnicité et nationalisme noir aux Etats-Unis. Mapping Yorùbá Networks.

Larry Murphy (2000). p. 257. ISBN 978-0-814-7558-08. Power and Agency in the Making of Transnational Communities. Duke University Press, 2004. Davis, Rod. American Voudou: Journey into a Hidden World. Denton: University of North Texas, 1998.

Charles H. Long, Perspectives for a Study of African American Religion, Down by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religion . Larry G. Murphy (New York: New York University Press, 2000), 20–25;Google Scholar

Charles H. Long, Perspectives for a Study of African American Religion, Down by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religion, ed. Murphy (New York: New York University Press, 2000), 1. oogle Scholar. Murphy (New York: New York University Press, 2000), 20–25;Google Scholar. Eddie S. Glaude J. Exodus!: Religion, Race, and Nation in Early Nineteenth-Century Black America (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000);Google Scholar.

Larry G Murphy, Larry Murphy. Down by the Riverside provides an expansive introduction to the development of African American religion and theology.

Early American Women Critics. Performance, Religion, Race. Down by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religion. Littlefield, Daniel C. Rice and Slaves: Ethnicity and the Slave Trade in Colonial South Carolina. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1981. New York: New York University Press, 2000: 273–86. Pinn, Anthony . error and Triumph: The Nature of Black Religion. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2003. Purifoy, Lewis M. The Methodist Anti-Slavery Tradition. Abolitionism and American Religion. Ed. McKivigan, John . .New York: Garland, 1999: 19–32.

Princeton Readings in Religion and Violence.

When scholars approach religion and race, they tend to focus on such issues as how African Americans have expressed Christianity, or how Japanese or Mexicans have lived religiously. Princeton Readings in Religion and Violence.

Compared with other groups, African-Americans express a high degree of comfort with religion’s role in politics. Fewer members of other religious groups express these views. At the same time, most African-Americans, like white evangelicals and other groups, support certain restrictions on the mingling of politics and religious institutions, with nearly six-in-ten (58%) saying that churches and other houses of worship should refrain from endorsing political candidates.

Down by the Riverside provides an expansive introduction to the development of African American religion and theology. Spanning the time of slavery up to the present, the volume moves beyond Protestant Christianity to address a broad diversity of African American religion from Conjure, Orisa, and Black Judaism to Islam, African American Catholicism, and humanism.

This accessible historical overview begins with African religious heritages and traces the transition to various forms of Christianity, as well as the maintenance of African and Islamic traditions in antebellum America. Preeminent contributors include Charles Long, Gayraud Wilmore, Albert Raboteau, Manning Marable, M. Shawn Copeland, Vincent Harding, Mary Sawyer, Toinette Eugene, Anthony Pinn, and C. Eric Lincoln and Lawrence Mamiya. They consider the varieties of religious expression emerging from migration from the rural South to urban areas, African American women's participation in Christian missions, Black religious nationalism, and the development of Black Theology from its nineteenth-century precursors to its formulation by James Cone and later articulations by black feminist and womanist theologians. They also draw on case studies to provide a profile of the Black Christian church today.

This thematic history of the unfolding of religious life in African America provides a window onto a rich array of African American people, practices, and theological positions.

Reviews (5)
Hatе&love
Wonderful tool for any student in the African American Ministerial culture.

Vital Beast
One gets the sense that African American religion and spirituality is far more diverse than popularly conceived from the very outset of this book, `Down by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religion,' edited by Larry Murphy. Murphy, a professor of the History of Christianity at Garrett-Evangelical/Northwestern, has put together a rich and varied collection of texts that go far beyond the `traditional' confines of African American religion being an exclusive province of the Protestant realm. The list of contributors is impressive: Albert Raboteau (whose own `Slave Religion' is a classic in the field), M. Shawn Copeland, Mary R. Sawyer, Charles H. Long and Gayraud Wilmore (just to name a few). The range of topics is also impressive - in addition to the tradition coverage of African American experience in Protestant circles, Murphy's collection includes pieces regarding African American experiences in Roman Catholicism, Judaism, Islam, religions that survived the Middle Passage in variant forms, and humanist/secular ideas.

Murphy's introductory essay and Charles Long's first article set the tone for the rest of the volume, which is divided into nine sections. Murphy describes African American religion in North America as a mosaic, and Long challenges the long-standing tradition of seeing Christianity as a normative standard against which all other religious experiences must be judged. Long presents three ideas that are interrelated, which for him `constitute symbolic images as well as methodological principles.' These are the religious image and historical reality of Africa, the involuntary nature of the presence and existence of an African American community, and the symbol and experience of God in black religious experience. Through stories, songs, poems, and biblical imagery, Long highlights important principles, picked up by further essayists Raboteau (the image of the exodus is primary for him), Wilmore (who adds further clarifications of his own), and Lincoln and Mamiya (who discuss the black sacred cosmos, contending that many researchers and observers are too quick to apply a sacred/secular division inappropriately to black culture).

The remaining sections of the book get to the heart of experience of African American religion in important segments - some concentrate on particular groups (Richard Brent Turner looks at Islam as an African inheritance whose practice was continued by slaves brought over, whose influence continues into the present; Merrill Singer looks at the phenomenon of Black Judaism in the United States, which includes efforts by some at immigration to the state of Israel under conditions of the Law of Return), some look at at particular theological movements (James Cone's article on Black Theology as Liberation Theology highlights the beginning for this kind of formal theological school; Toinette M. Eugene looks at Womanist theology, one of the latest branches in this developing tradition; M. Shawn Copeland looks at the Catholic/Black Theology relationship). None of the articles tend to highlight a particular man or woman in isolation (with two exceptions), but the key figures in African American history (which cannot realistically be separated from the attendant religious history) are all represented in the essays and narrative historical strands. The two exceptions to this rule are W.E.B. Du Bois, and the enigmatic Father Major Jealous Divine.

Attention is paid to issues of men and women, of geographic differences, and of different religious underpinnings. The experience of those following the Santeria groups is vastly different from those who work in the Christian denominations, be they from within the mainline, white-dominated sects or the African American denominations (CME, AME, etc.). This book is very valuable in this respect - it gives a strong hearing to a diversity of religious experience, relating these to the overall history of the development of the country as well as the African American community generally, while holding on to the important historical differences each group exhibits.

The African American Christian experience is nonetheless well represented in all its many forms. These include descriptive/narrative essays as well as analytical essays, such as Lincoln and Mamiya's article on the dialectical model of the Black Church. While this dialectical model is based on the tensions present in the church (the authors identify six key polar pairings showing this dialectical movement), these tensions are ultimately unresolved, and perhaps destined to never be resolved. However, it does provide for the dynamic of change and growth within the Black Church, and could probably be applied beyond this context very easily.

The appendices give interesting detail in summary/snapshot form of the timeline of African American religious history, as well as a list of films that might be used for further study. These are lesser known film documentaries (popular Hollywood cinematic releases are not incorporated here). The index is useful if incomplete (the first two references I went to check were not included in the index; for example, despite being a key figure in Black Theology and a contributor to this volume, the name of James Cone does not appear in the index).

The final essays by Wilmore and Harding each look at the overall direction of African American religious history and experience. Wilmore sees religion, in all its diversity and complexity, as still remaining `the essential thread interweaving the fabric of black culture', with three primary traditions (survival, elevation, and liberation) as working in interrelationship. Harding looks at the freedom movement and its relationship with religious experience, ending with a series of open-ended questions meant to provoke further conversation and reflection.

This is an important book for anyone interested in the development of religious traditions in America.

Nten
An introduction to the variety of African American religious thought spanning from the time of slavery up to the present. From Protestant Christianity to Conjure, Orisa & Black Judaism, from Islam, Catholicism & humanism.
A learned, footnoted & occasionally anecdotal, absorbing immersion into the roots of African American faith & its everyday practices, how the mixtures were blended, who stirred them.

Goltigor
i love this book

Lightseeker
Very interesting& informative

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