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Virgins of Venice: Broken Vows and Cloistered Lives in the Renaissance Convent epub ebook

by Mary Laven

Virgins of Venice: Broken Vows and Cloistered Lives in the Renaissance Convent epub ebook

Author: Mary Laven
Category: World
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books (June 29, 2004)
Pages: 320 pages
ISBN: 0142004014
ISBN13: 978-0142004012
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 209
Other formats: rtf lit doc mobi


Virgins of Venice book. Laven has created a detailed and dramatic Venice in the late Renaissance was a city of fabulous wealth, reckless creativity, and growing social unrest.

Virgins of Venice book. It was also a city of walls and secrets, ghettos and cloisters. In this captivating book, Cambridge historian Mary Laven uncovers the long-hidden stories of the Virgins of Venice and the surprising lives they led.

Virgins of Venice : Enclosed Lives and Broken Vows in the Renaissance Convent. She describes a fascinating slice of 16th century life

Virgins of Venice : Enclosed Lives and Broken Vows in the Renaissance Convent. She describes a fascinating slice of 16th century life. What is remarkable is that the 'slice' is actually quite large. As Laven relates, noble women (most professed nuns were noble) had few options. Most families concentrated their financial resources in a dowry for only one daughter and the rest commonly went to the convent. For many of these women life in a nunnery was not voluntary.

Mary Laven's book, Virgins of Venice, received the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize for literature published in. .

Mary Laven's book, Virgins of Venice, received the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize for literature published in Britain in 2002, and I can see wh. Laven thus introduces what I think is her most interesting thesis and contribution to the study of Renaissance nuns: in an effort to restore civic pride and good government after a military defeat in 1509, and hurt by rivals' attempts to cripple the city's hold on the Adriatic Sea trade, the Patriarch and the Senate targeted certain segments of the city's.

Broken Vows and Cloistered Lives in the Renaissance Convent.

Virgins of Venice : Broken Vows and Cloistered Lives in the Renaissance Convent. Venice in the late Renaissance was a city of fabulous wealth, reckless creativity, and growing social unrest. Unfortunately, without some recognition of the substantial lives of cloistered nuns during the late Renaissance, Mary Laven's book gives us the impression of mostly wasted lives of women who were sacrificed as individuals by their patriarchal society. There's truth in that, but only partial truth.

Virgin's of Venice: Broken Vows and Cloistered Lives in the Renaissance Convent. New York: Penguin Books, 2002. Patriarch Matteo Zane" Catholic-Hierarchy. Retrieved June 28, 2017.

Venice in the late Renaissance was a city of fabulous wealth, reckless creativity, and .

Venice in the late Renaissance was a city of fabulous wealth, reckless creativity, and growing social unrest as its maritime empire crumbled. It was also a city of walls and secrets, ghettos, and cloisters-including fifty convents housing three thousand nuns, many of them refined, upper-class women who had been immured against their will. In this utterly fascinating book, Cambridge historian Mary Laven uncovers the long-hidden stories of the "virgins of Venice" and the secret, and often surprising, lives they led.

Now Mary Laven has produced a remarkable study of the convents of Venice in the 16th and 17th centuries, which reveals whole communities of nuns living enclosed lives strategically poised between the sacred and the profane

Now Mary Laven has produced a remarkable study of the convents of Venice in the 16th and 17th centuries, which reveals whole communities of nuns living enclosed lives strategically poised between the sacred and the profane. Basing her vividly told story on scrupulously scholarly study of the Venetian archives, Laven provides the reader with astonishingly fresh, immediate insights into the fascinating reality of day-to-day convent existence. Frequently quoting directly from the convent records, what she tells us is a revelation

Hope and love keep us in this pleasant prison" reads the 16th-century plaque over a Venetian convent, and Mary Laven's book shows that for many of the women in Venice's 50 or so convents, they really were a kind of prison

Hope and love keep us in this pleasant prison" reads the 16th-century plaque over a Venetian convent, and Mary Laven's book shows that for many of the women in Venice's 50 or so convents, they really were a kind of prison. The heart of the problem was that thousands and thousands of them were in there for life, with no getting out - only because it was a dumping ground for unmarried daughters, caught in a dowry system that routinely made marriage impossible.

As promised, another book that delves into a particular detail of Venetian history, specifically Renaissance, is Virgins of Venice: Broken Vows and Cloistered Lives in the Renaissance Convent by Mary Laven

As promised, another book that delves into a particular detail of Venetian history, specifically Renaissance, is Virgins of Venice: Broken Vows and Cloistered Lives in the Renaissance Convent by Mary Laven. Fascinating! I read it twice in a row, and used a highlighter to mark half the book, and I’m not even a student. Nerdy for Venice! This work inspired a chapter in my book Venice; I had to write about this part of Venetian women’s history. In a nutshell, for hundreds of years in Venice (and all over Europe), women were forced into nunneries

Mary Laven, Virgins of Venice: Broken Vows and Cloistered Lives in the Renaissance Convent (New York: Viking, 2003). Is it possible to express the concept of life in mathematical terms? This is a challenge for life scientists. Meridian circulation is closely related to life

Mary Laven, Virgins of Venice: Broken Vows and Cloistered Lives in the Renaissance Convent (New York: Viking, 2003). The Avila of Saint Teresa: Religious Reform in a Sixteenth-Century City. Meridian circulation is closely related to life. Life would end, if meridian circulation stops.

Documents the experiences of late-Renaissance Venetian nuns, many of whom were upper-class women immured against their will, exploring how convents of the period were often political hotbeds and the sites of illicit love affairs in their residents' efforts to find fulfillment. Reprint.
Reviews (7)
Garne
Very thorough and successfully covers a sensitive topic that has the very real potential to both scandalize some people, but at the same time sensationalize those with an agenda of some sort. The author gives the whole topic an even handed and fair treatment in my opinion. Reading this book makes me glad I am a woman in the 21st Century and not in such time when there was far worse misogyny and women had no real choices at all.

Morlurne
Scandalous material and solid if not perfect scholarship (I feel that her examples that focus only on those from the upper reaches of Italian society, who would have had power regardless of being in convent, detract from the whole of the experience of all women in convents.)

Just very interesting material that kept my attention, cannot say for certain where this fits (positively or negatively) in the scholarship of renaissance religious life.

Cyregaehus
i really enjoyed this book. i was expecting it to cover more of the italian renaissance (mid to late 1400's), but rather it covered in bulk the late 1500s to mid-1600s. still a really good read. hopefully she will publish some more writings, as i found myself rather sad i was done.

Orll
Sheds a very different light on the Catholic convents of the fifteenth century. A happy time for nuns and their clerical consorts.

Xellerlu
This is an excellent work: a very well researched, interesting and enlightening work.

Watikalate
A great book!

Malodora
Laven's scholarly study (originally her doctoral's thesis) is nonetheless a readable account of nunnery life in early Renaissance Venice. She describes a fascinating slice of 16th century life. What is remarkable is that the 'slice' is actually quite large. As Laven relates, noble women (most professed nuns were noble) had few options. Most families concentrated their financial resources in a dowry for only one daughter and the rest commonly went to the convent. For many of these women life in a nunnery was not voluntary.

As part of the Church's defensive reaction in the Counter-Reformation, Venetian convents became much more strictly enclosed by the strictures of the Council of Trent. The enclosure laws greatly benefited Laven's work because most of her material comes directly from court records. These sources are both book's greatest strength and its weakness. The records provide insight into the behavior of real people, individuals with names and families, in and around nunneries. Given the lack of other available resources, the reliance on court records distorts our view because we mostly only read about those situations that made it to court. Fortunately for us, convent life was quite strictly regulated, yet nuns were also determined to have dealings with the outside world - many of them non-sexual - so Laven has access to many records.

A very interesting case study. The Church was so central to medieval and Renaissance life that anyone who wants to understand those periods must understand the role of religion and the Church as an institution. Laven's book is highly instructive and highly recommended.

If we could travel back in time, and our machine landed in 16th century Venice, what would you like to see? Grand palaces, and the people who lived in them? Carnival time in the Piazza of San Marco? Perhaps life on the streets? What about life in a convent? Too dull, you think? Then, you have not read Mary Laven's Virgins of Venice, a remarkable journey into the lives of the women who lived in the fifty or so convents that existed in Venice at the time.
Nunneries were not only spiritual houses, but also end stations for noble women who could not be given away in marriage by their families. By using reports of investigations and trials, together with statements that came from the nuns themselves, Laven opens a world of suffocating oppression and enforced chastity, but also a world of determination from the nuns to lead a life as normal as possible. Contact with the outside world might have not been allowed, but the courts were full of incidents where both outsiders and nuns had breached the law. For instance, we learn that Zuana, a "gossip", kept hens for Madonna Suor Gabriela, and that in exchange, Suor Gabriela provided Zuana with wine and other commodities.
This and many other stories make this book impossible to put down, since we feel anger, sadness, despair and sympathy for those women whose lives were condemned from the moment they entered the convent. On the other hand, we can't help but to feel glad that the nuns did everything they could to fight back. From being petty to actually engaging in sexual acts, these nuns will forever be a remainder that no matter time and place, human beings will do the impossible to lead dignified lives. Bravo, Leven!

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