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History

London at War, 1939-1945 epub ebook

by Philip Ziegler

London at War, 1939-1945 epub ebook

Author: Philip Ziegler
Category: Military
Language: English
Publisher: Sinclair-Stevenson Ltd; 1st edition (March 13, 1995)
Pages: 400 pages
ISBN: 1856193845
ISBN13: 978-1856193849
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 540
Other formats: lrf doc mobi mbr


London at War 1939-1945 book. Ziegler wa Philip Sandeman Ziegler is a British biographer and historian

London at War 1939-1945 book. Ziegler wa Philip Sandeman Ziegler is a British biographer and historian. Originally intending to be a novelist, he began a career as biographer with his life of Talleyrand's lover, the Duchess of Dino. He has written in various journals and newspapers including The Spectator, The Listener, The Times, The Daily Telegraph and History Today. Ziegler was educated at St Cyprian's School, Eastbourne, and went with the school when it merged with Summer Fields School, Oxford.

The London County Council Bomb Damage Maps, 1939-1945. In this volume Ziegler explores the conduct and experiences of the people of London during World War II, from the so-called Phoney War September 1939 to April 1940, the Nazi blitzes of London, causing death and destruction, and the deprivations and shortages. The first chapter The Greatest City provides a social and economic portrait of London in 1939. London was the prime target for aerial attack, it's rulers believed it to be the most threatened and most vulnerable.

In 1939 London was not merely the greatest city in the world, it was the most tempting and vulnerable target for aerial . I hope,' Ziegler writes, 'we will never have to endure again what they went through between 1939 and 1945. I hope, if we did, that we would conduct ourselves as well.

In 1939 London was not merely the greatest city in the world, it was the most tempting and vulnerable target for aerial attack. For six years it was the frontline of the free world's battle against Fascism.

London at war, 1939-1945. 3. The Greatest City.

London At War 1939-1945. Condition: Acceptable. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. Country: UK. Paperback Book. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

London at War 1939–1945 (1995). Osbert Sitwell (1998). Britain Then and Now: The Francis Frith Collection (1999). Soldiers: Fighting Men's Lives, 1901–2001 (2001). Man Of Letters: The Extraordinary Life and Times of Literary Impresario Rupert Hart-Davis (2005). Legacy: Cecil Rhodes, The Rhodes Trust and Rhodes Scholarships (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2008). Edward Heath (Harper Press, 2010). ISBN 978-0-00-724740-0. Olivier (MacLehose Press, 2013). George VI: The Dutiful King (Penguin, 2014). Between the Wars: 1919-1939 (MacLehose Press, 2016). Critical Survey of Contemporary Fiction). In LONDON AT WAR, Philip Ziegler reaffirms the traditional interpretation. He claims that the war brought a change of heart for Londoners as they developed a new sense of unity and a readiness to sacrifice their personal interests for the good of the community. We'll Help Your Grades Soar.

London At War. 1939 - 1945. Through a wealth of interviews and unpublished letters and diaries, as well as innumerable books and newspapers, the author has built up a vivid picture of a population under siege. There were cowards, there were criminals, there were incompetents, but what emerges from these pages is above all a record of astonishing patience, dignity and courage.

This is the story of London at war - or, perhaps, of Londoners at war, for Philip Ziegler, known best as a biographer .

This is the story of London at war - or, perhaps, of Londoners at war, for Philip Ziegler, known best as a biographer, is above all fascinated by the people who found their lives so suddenly and violently transformed: the querulous, tiresome yet strangely gallant housewife from West Hampstead; the turbulent, left-wing retired schoolmaster from Walthamstow, always having a go at the authorities; the odiously snobbish middleclass lady from Kensington, sneering at the scum who took shelter in the Underground; the typist from Fulham, the plumber from Woolwich. Author: Philip Ziegler. ISBN 13: 978-0712698719.

Reviews (7)
Mitynarit
Nice to re-read an old favorite still enjoyable

Unsoo
DOES NOT OFFER PERSONAL STORIES AS ADVERTISED, MOSTLY A STATISTICAL DATA BASED BOOK!VERY DISAPPOINTED!

Very Old Chap
Bought this as a gift for someone that enjoys reading about WW2 from other countries perspective. The recipient was pleased with it after reading.

Deorro
In this volume Ziegler explores the conduct and experiences of the people of London during World War II, from the so-called Phoney War September 1939 to April 1940, the Nazi blitzes of London, causing death and destruction, and the deprivations and shortages.

The first chapter The Greatest City provides a social and economic portrait of London in 1939.
London was the prime target for aerial attack, it's rulers believed it to be the most threatened and most vulnerable.

while it was not the city in England, that took the most damage, it was the city in Britain that came under the longest and most sustained attack.

It is impossible not to compare the anti-war movement in Britain of World War II, to the anti-war movement today. when you read about it, the similarities are striking.
Marchers took place in London, shouting the praises of Hitler and the Nazis, the same way 60 years later marches would take place by Muslims and Leftist radicals, shouting the praises of Saddam Hussein, Hamas, Hezbollah and condemning brave leaders like Tony Blair and George W Bush for taking a stand against evil just as anti-war rallies in the ;late 1930s had heaped abuse upon Churchill.
In 1940 there was even a Stop The War candidate in Bow and Bromley...we have such perfidious parties and groups with the same name today.

Thousands of people tuned into the broadcasts of Irish Nazi propagandist William Joyce, better known as 'Lord HawHaw'.
His counterparts today such as Robert Fisk and John Pilger abound.

Most strikingly the Jews were blamed by the anti-war movement prior to World War II, just as today's anti-war movement blames the Jewish State for all the world's problems and is 'anti-war' but pro-terror i.e so much for being supposedly peace loving.

Britain realized in 1939 that appeasement of evil tyranny does not work. Most the world realizes that going to war against German and Italian Fascism was the right thing to do in 1939/40, but have not yet internalized that we must take action against Islamo-Fascism.

We read of the damage done to the London zoo.
Many animals were evacuated. Chimpanzees and a young reindeer brought back from Russia known as Polyanna, helped to up morale.

On the zoo's front lawn people were taught how to keep fowl in a confined space and to rear rabbits, bees, pigeons and silkworms.
We learn of aerial milltary strategy and how the emergency services palyed their role in coping with casulaites and damage, the enetertainment during the war, and how people celebrated Christmas despite the shortages of so much that was usually taken for granted.

It is interesting to note that three quarters of those who defined themselves as atheists or agnostics admitted to having resorted to prayer in moments of intolerable stress.
A very interesting expose of how the people of London survived sustained attack with valour and determination.
In this age of terror, we can certainly learn from their example. Especially if the Islamo-Nazi terror spreads in a big way to the West.
We can also learn from the bravery of the people of Israel in coping with sustained terror and living under attack.

FailCrew
Zeigler has managed to give a real sense of what it must have been like to be in London during the war years. Zeigler takes the tactic of examining history as the impact of events upon the people of London -- the growing clouds of war, the first alerts, the lulls, the bombing, the terror and the courage of a people determined to keep their community, their great city, alive. He describes the slow acclimatising toward austerity of which not all wanted to participate; particularly in the lull between the declaration of war (in which there seemed to be little impact on the London scene save rising prices and product scarcity) and the beginning of bombing (at which time the population rallied much more completely).
'On 24 August (1940) the first bombs fell on central London, starting fires in the East End. Probably the bombing was accidental, but retaliatory raids on Berlin made it inevitable that the process, once started, would escalate dramatically.' The rallying effort to build the community was great, such that 'by February 1941, it was estimated that 92 per cent of London's population could be accommodated in public or private shelters.'
At the end of the war, the preparations of the rationing ministries and the police to keep civil order were almost as detailed and daunting as D-Day; the demand for material (flags) and food for celebrations required a reaffirmation of ration regulations; London and the rest of Britain would still remain on rations for years after the war. Even ceremonies such as the State Opening of Parliament would be scaled down due to the unreadiness of transport or lack of men and material.
Zeigler regrets that human nature reverted back to norm and the community spirit built up during the war quickly disintegrated after the war. Grand plans for rebuilding were never carried out -- London incurred more than half the casualties of cities during the war (over 80,000 in London alone), and the community pulled together to survive, but this cohesion didn't last after the threat was gone; however, Ziegler states, 'there is much that Londoners can look back on with pride, remarkably little about which they need to feel ashamed.'
Picture plates complete the visual story of London at war (the photograph on the cover of men looking through the still-standing library shelves of a bombed-out building is fascinating), and the writing style of Zeigler is compelling and full. A journey into our recent past definitely to be taken.

Just_paw
The author provides a comprehensive history of London in World War II, drawing on many diaries and other contemporary accounts. Readers will recognize not only London landmarks and neighborhoods, but also famous people who lived in London during the war, including George Orwell and H.G. Wells. The book is filled with anecdotes: my favorite is about Mr. Frederick Leighton-Morris, who "...removed a 50kg bomb from his flat in Jermyn Street and tottered down the pavement with it." (He was fined 100 pounds by a magistrate, who told Leighton-Morris he could not decide "in which part of London a delayed action bomb should go off."
Here, too, are vignettes of Londoners sheltering in the Tube, growing vegetables in allotments in Hyde Park, raising pigs in basements, and finding food for their dogs despite rationing. This book is an excellent companion to Maureen Weller's book on the last year of the war in London (1945). If you read both, read this one first (not second, as I did). That way at least, chronology is served. There is very little if any duplication in the two books: both are superb.

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