» » Lincoln's Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict
hotellemcasadeicervia.it
ePub 1255 kb. | Fb2 1221 kb. | DJVU: 1748 kb.
History

Lincoln's Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict epub ebook

by John Burt

Lincoln's Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict epub ebook

Author: John Burt
Category: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Belknap Press: An Imprint of Harvard University Press; 1St Edition edition (January 7, 2013)
Pages: 832 pages
ISBN: 0674050185
ISBN13: 978-0674050181
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 841
Other formats: mbr lit docx txt


President Abraham Lincoln Second Inaugural Address - Hear and Read the Full Text - Продолжительность: 4:50 TimelessReader1 Recommended for you.

President Abraham Lincoln Second Inaugural Address - Hear and Read the Full Text - Продолжительность: 4:50 TimelessReader1 Recommended for you. 4:50. Первый сезон - Железных монстров, Мультики про танки - Продолжительность: 1:19:31 HomeAnimations - Мультики про танки Recommended for you.

Request PDF On Dec 1, 2016, Mischa Honeck and others published Lincoln’s Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln .

Request PDF On Dec 1, 2016, Mischa Honeck and others published Lincoln’s Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict. This new book focuses on Lencioni’s opinion.

Lincoln's Tragic Pragmatism book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lincoln's Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Lincoln's Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Recently viewed (1). Lincoln’s Tragic Pragm. A Short Literary History of the United States. Table of Contents Vol. 64 (2016). Lincoln’s Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict. German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009, USA.

Lincoln's Tragic Pragmatism : Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict.

Burt calls the attempt their "tragic pragmatism. The author rationalizes Lincoln's prewar racist statements as necessary to achieve an immediate political good and not reflecting his broader moral thinking. At every step he provides in-depth analysis of the escalating conflict over slavery that made political and sectional compromise impossible. Burt concludes that Lincoln, beginning with his Peoria speech in October 1854 and despite his repeated protests, committed himself to seeking not only emancipation but also political equality as well as emancipation for blacks.

Lincoln's Tragic Pragmatism. Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict. In 1858, challenger Abraham Lincoln debated incumbent Stephen Douglas seven times in the race for a . Senate seat from Illinois. More was at stake than slavery in those debates. In Lincoln’s Tragic Pragmatism, John Burt contends that the very legitimacy of democratic governance was on the line. In a United States stubbornly divided over ethical issues, the overarching question posed by the Lincoln-Douglas debates has not lost its urgency: Can a liberal political system be used to mediate moral disputes? And if it cannot, is violence inevitable?

In their famous debates, Lincoln and Douglas struggled with how to behave when an ethical conflict like slavery strained democracy’s commitment to rule by both consent and principle. What conscience demands and what it can persuade others to agree to are not always the same.

Brandeis University Professor John Burt talked about his book, Lincoln’s Tragic Pragmatism: Lincoln, Douglas, and Moral Conflict, about the Lincoln Douglas Debates. He was joined by other historians and academics who spoke about President Lincoln’s political career. They responded to questions from the audience.

Lincoln’s Tragic Pragmatism is a brilliant, ground-breaking book with fresh insights on almost every page. No one has analyzed the ironies and problems of liberal politics with the rigor, depth, and subtlety Burt displays here

Lincoln’s Tragic Pragmatism is a brilliant, ground-breaking book with fresh insights on almost every page. No one has analyzed the ironies and problems of liberal politics with the rigor, depth, and subtlety Burt displays here.

In 1858, challenger Abraham Lincoln debated incumbent Stephen Douglas seven times in the race for a U.S. Senate seat from Illinois. More was at stake than slavery in those debates. In Lincoln’s Tragic Pragmatism, John Burt contends that the very legitimacy of democratic governance was on the line. In a United States stubbornly divided over ethical issues, the overarching question posed by the Lincoln-Douglas debates has not lost its urgency: Can a liberal political system be used to mediate moral disputes? And if it cannot, is violence inevitable?

As they campaigned against each other, both Lincoln and Douglas struggled with how to behave when an ethical conflict as profound as the one over slavery strained the commitment upon which democracy depends―namely, to rule by both consent and principle. This commitment is not easily met, because what conscience demands and what it is able to persuade others to consent to are not always the same. While Lincoln ultimately avoided a politics of morality detached from consent, and Douglas avoided a politics of expediency devoid of morality, neither found a way for liberalism to mediate the conflict of slavery.

That some disputes seemed to lie beyond the horizon of deal-making and persuasion and could be settled only by violence revealed democracy’s limitations. Burt argues that the unresolvable ironies at the center of liberal politics led Lincoln to discover liberalism’s tragic dimension―and ultimately led to war. Burt’s conclusions demand reevaluations of Lincoln and Douglas, the Civil War, and democracy itself.

Reviews (7)
Prorahun
The book seems endless and yet it reveals a history of the US prior to the civil war that is not really known to most of us. In some ways (but only some) it is like the present period of US history where the underlying struggle is not clear but is clearly important and, I think, not what it seems. It is well written, but philosophical in tone. Not for the faint of heart.

Arith
This is a good book, though extremely tedious due to minutia of detail--but then that is actually what I was looking for.

Frosha
Was a gift and the birthday boy was very pleased.

Gna
I find the book endlessly absorbing. I enjoy the historic detail and placing the struggle between Lincoln and Douglas in a values context. The study of the Dred Scott decision is quite informative. I am compelled by the vision of Lincoln moving himself and the nation towards the goal of racial equality as implicit in his positions, but perhaps only imperfectly and gradually realized as being so by Lincoln himself. I do think that the book makes a more cogent argument for Douglas' position that politics needs to be a way that controversies are contained short of violence than Douglas did himself - as the author acknowledges. Interest politics could not resolve the question of slavery, as the book makes forcefully clear. I get the sense from this book, as I have from biographies of Lincoln and Douglas, that the two were on historic tectonic plates, each moving past each other, the one into the future, the other not.
Burt's work is a treasure to read.

Zeleence
Fascinating look at the philosophy of Lincoln. Much more than a traditional recitation of the facts, the book shows the evolution of Lincoln's thoughts, in particular in relation to slavery.

Swordsong
A challenging read. The author has written a major examination of lLincoln's political philosophy. Well worth the effort needed to stick with it.

Lahorns Gods
This book simply blew me away. Rarely have I read such a nuanced treatment of the Lincoln-Douglas debates and their significance for today's politics. If you want to be reaffirmed in your confidence in liberalism as a winning political philosophy this is the book. Simply astonishing.

The writing is superlative. Lincoln comes across as a prescient thinker and master politician. The authors remarks and prestisginations into outer space really make for great reading. Sometimes, I got lost in the facts.

2016-2020 © www.hotellemcasadeicervia.it
All rights reserved