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Fighting for Defeat: Union Military Failure in the East, 1861-1865 epub ebook

by Michael C. C. Adams

Fighting for Defeat: Union Military Failure in the East, 1861-1865 epub ebook

Author: Michael C. C. Adams
Category: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Bison Books (March 1, 1992)
Pages: 256 pages
ISBN: 0803210353
ISBN13: 978-0803210356
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 532
Other formats: lrf azw lrf mbr


Fighting for Defeat book. Fighting for Defeat argues that the Union army’s lack of success in the eastern theater early in the Civil War was due largely to its fear that the Confederate army was invincible.

Fighting for Defeat book.

United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Campaigns. United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Psychological aspects. Harvard University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on February 27, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Adams challenges the prevailing view that in the Virginia campaigns . The union armies, he argues, defeated themselves by assuming Southern superiority.

Adams challenges the prevailing view that in the Virginia campaigns superior Southern military skills led to Confederate victories. Here is a bold, new interpretation of the military conduct of the Civil War that sheds new light on the cultural and intellectual life of antebellum America. Adams challenges the prevailing view that in the Virginia campaigns superior Southern military skills led to Confederate victories.

1861-1865 By Michael . Adams writes that even victory at Gettysburg in July 1863 did little to alter the mental outlook of the Union rank and file.

Fighting for Defeat: Union Military Failure in the East, 1861-1865 By Michael . Such defeatist thinking, in fact, pervaded the entire Army of the Potomac throughout the war, historian Michael . Adams argues in his book Fighting for Defeat: Union Military Failure in the East, 1861-1865, originally published under the title Our Masters the Rebels.

Michael C. C. Adams, Our Masters the Rebels: A Speculation on Union Military Failure in the East, 1861–1865 (Cambridge, Mass. and London: Harvard Univ. Pp. xiv, 256. Peter J. Parish (a1). University of Dundee.

The Union was dedicated to the defeat and termination of the Confederate States of America, informally called "the Confederacy" or "the South".

Michael Charles Corringham Adams, British history educator. Our Masters the Rebels: A Speculation on Union Military Failure in the East, 1861-1865. Recipient Jefferson Davis Book award Museum Confederacy, 1979, British Government scholar, 1963-1970.

Union forces in the East attempted to maneuver past Lee and fought several battles during that phase of the .

Union forces in the East attempted to maneuver past Lee and fought several battles during that phase of the eastern campaign, sometimes termed Grant’s Overland Campaign. Stalemate in the Eastern Theater. Many of the Civil War’s most important and bloodiest battles occurred in the eastern theater between Washington, . Military historians divide the campaign into two formal phases: operations against Vicksburg from December 1862 to January 1863, and Grant’s operations against Vicksburg from March to July 1863.

AUTHOR Adams, Michael C. 1945- TITLE Our masters the rebels : a speculation on Union military failure in the East, 1861-1865, Michael C. Adams. IMPRINT Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1978. A2. AUTHOR Ash, Stephen V. TITLE When the Yankees came : conflict and chaos in the occupied South, 1861-1865, by Stephen V. Ash. IMPRINT Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1995. AUTHOR Ayers, Edward . 1953-. TITLE In the presence of mine enemies : war in the heart of America, 1859-1863, Edward L. Ayers. IMPRINT New York : .

Our Masters the Rebels: A Speculation on Union Military Failure in the East, 1861–1865. Clark, John E. Railroads in the Civil War: The Impact of Management On Victory And Defeat. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1978. Bartholomes, J. J. Boone Buff. Facings and Gilt Buttons: Staff and Headquarters Operations in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861–1865. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 1998. Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 2004. Coates, Earl J. and Dean S. Thomas.

Fighting for Defeat argues that the Union army’s lack of success in the eastern theater early in the Civil War was due largely to its fear that the Confederate army was invincible. Certain to arouse discussion, this study by Michael C. C. Adams combines probing social and psychological analysis, blood-rushing description of events, and candid pictures of President Lincoln, and Generals George McClellan and Ulysses Grant, among many others. It was first published in 1978 with the main title Our Masters the Rebels.
Reviews (2)
Kanek
Fascinating study of the Army of the Potomac's commanders inability to stand up against Lee and the Army of another's Virginia on even terms due to a chronic feeling of inferiority. Adams writes a study not so much of battles fought, although they are referenced to make points, but of why the Union mindset was often impaired to the point of inertia. The prime example is McClellan's discovery of Lee's orders in Maryland but loses his initial jump start to slow and not fully commit his force. One if the primary reason was the perception that the south had better leaders and that they were better organized and even had the benefit of a perceived efficient dictator ship with natural soldiers. The basis for much of this perception cane from the Union officer corps led by McClellan who perceived the south as being led by an upper class aristocracy, planters and military that were gentlemen and natural born leaders and that their volunteer soldiers were much more professional. In turn, many of the eastern upperclass including many Union generals looked down upon Lincoln as uncouth and coarse and that the abolitionists were responsible for the war. The perception of superiority of the confederates never left McClellan and those that followed until Grant fueled extraordinary caution and loss of initiative that Lee often took advantage of. Case in point, Hooker has Lee in the vise that he planned for at Chancellorsville, but after breaking into open country that gave him the advantage with his massive artillery, he pulls back into the woods and freezes, losing his nerve. As Adams says, Lee's order of Jackson's flank March was not so audacious, he knew his opponent was incapable of taking the offensive. McClellan gave up his advantage of numbers at Antietam and knowledge of his position and Meade was satisfied with a draw and was reluctant to pursue Lee after Gettysburg or initiate aggressive section for almost a year. Grant, much like Lincoln, was from common roots and was not in awe of Lee or any southern commander. In addition, the partnership of Grant and Lincoln, men considered from 'common origins', brought the war in a broad strategic plan that effectively squeezed the confederates militarily and their resources. Historian T. Harry Williams noted that Lincoln was the best strategist in the war, with Grant he received respect and a man who gained the initiative.
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FRAY
A remarkable "thought piece" looking into the minds and hearts of an entire generation of Northerners as they faced war against opponents whom they sadly idolized and glorified. The original title of this book, "Our Masters, the Enemy" should have been kept because it more accurately described the mind-set which had to be overcome before victory could be achieved. Adams does not say this is the "only" way to describe what happened, but it certainly explains a great deal. It deserves a great deal more attention from scholars and the general public.

See also this book for a discussion of the views of one of those Northern generals who did not subscribe to this view:

Citizen-General: Jacob Dolson Cox and the Civil War Era (War and Society in North America)

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