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History

Closest of Enemies epub ebook

by Wayne Smith

Closest of Enemies epub ebook

Author: Wayne Smith
Category: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc; Reprint edition (May 1, 1988)
Pages: 310 pages
ISBN: 0393305309
ISBN13: 978-0393305302
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 159
Other formats: lrf docx doc lit


The Closest of Enemies" by Wayne S. Smith-a former officer in the State Department-gives a different perspective . Smith returned to Havana in 1979 and described what he saw. There was no poverty and misery that exists in other Latin American countries.

The Closest of Enemies" by Wayne S. Smith-a former officer in the State Department-gives a different perspective to that view. He describes some of the internal disputes that occurred over that hard line policy and shows us a Cuba at variance with what has been presented in the media. Everyone was provided with food, clothing, shelter, an education and medical care.

The Closest of Enemies book. The most detailed, personal, and accurate history of .  .

Closest of Enemies book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

policy toward Cuba and Central America during the Carter and Reagan years.

The Enemies of Books is a book on biblioclasts and book preservation by the 19th-century bibliophile and book collector William Blades.

Smith, Wayne S. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on August 12, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Wayne Smith, Baytown, Texas. Wayne Smith is a proud Vietnam Veteran who was decorated for his service who has a strong record of fighting for the men and women in uniform and our veterans. I should kno. e’s my father and he taught me those values. Election Day is this Tuesday, May 24th Voting Locations: waynesmithcampaign.

We were the closest of enemies, Wayne S. Smith, who was the first chief of the mission in 1977, once . Smith, who was the first chief of the mission in 1977, once remarked. The exchanges have included the serious, including the occasional expulsion of diplomatic officers, and the theatrical, especially when Mr. Castro was in power and made the interest section a rallying point to lacerate American policy. On more than one occasion, American diplomats said they came to their homes to find all of the family books rearranged, presumably by state security agents making it abundantly clear that they were watching.

Wayne Smith: Jamaican reggae and dancehall musician best known for his 1985 hit "Under Mi Sleng Teng", which is regarded as the track which initiated the digital era of reggae. Dancing Machine, Killing Machine, Under Me Sleng Teng, Under the Sleng Teng и другие песни. Вся дискография, Радио, Концерты, рекомендации и похожие исполнители.

By Cameron Wayne Smith. No part of this book may be distributed, posted, or reproduced in any form by digital or mechanical means without prior written permission of the publisher. Cover design by Liz Freeman. Chapter 1: Rock and Roll.

Offers a detailed account of U.S.-Cuban relations since Castro's rise to power and examines the policies of the Reagan administration
Reviews (4)
Hulore
Informative: author's first-hand knowledge and use of primary sources. Page-turner.

Onaxan
Wayne is Honest. It is difficult to find something written in the US about Cuba, that is objective, accurate and truthful.This book is one of the very few ones which are.

Jorad
As a former Head of the US Interests Section (USIS) in Havana, Wayne Smith has not just lived the politics of Cuban - US relations, but has actually made some. After representing the US under President Carter in the tiny Caribbean dictatorship, a nation subject to tight US economic sanctions, Wayne Smith has come forward to speak about those sanctions. While he does not support the Cuban regime or its ideology in any way (neither do I), he believes that the embargo is strongly counter-productive, as it ends up helping Castro in his goal of resisting foreign influence and trends towards change. This is an argument most scholars agree with, and is surely not new. Yet, in this book Wayne Smith has been able to put forward the argument in a very particular light, from the point of view of someone who actually represented the embargo-enforcing nation for several years, and then had a sharp change in opinion. The book is extremely well written. As an academic study it is highly rigorous and extremely subjective: the author criticizes diverging views, but does not attack them just out of differences, and he manages to substantiate and argue his own views extremely well. The book is concise and clear, simple to read and even enjoyable. It is an absolute must for anyone approaching the delicate issue of Cuban - US relations in the current period.

Hinewen
Shortly after Castro came to power the U.S. took a hard line against Cuba. To support that position it portrayed Castro as a tyrannical dictator who subjected his people to a repressive regime. The media, endorsing the government's hard line, has given the public a picture of Cuba to justify that policy.
"The Closest of Enemies" by Wayne S. Smith-a former officer in the State Department-gives a different perspective to that view. He describes some of the internal disputes that occurred over that hard line policy and shows us a Cuba at variance with what has been presented in the media. His tours of duty brought him to Cuba in 1957-59, during the period when Battista was overthrown and again from 1977-81, when he was chief of the U.S. interests section in Havana.
The disagreements on foreign policy were not his alone. Many of the career foreign service officers felt that resolving differences through negotiation would be more productive. But both Democratic and Republican administrations-Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, Clinton--have followed the same uncompromising line.
Even before Castro came to power an arbitrary policy was followed. When it was apparent that the Cubans were opposed to Battista the U.S. continued to support him. They could have backed a more moderate candidate instead but waited until it was too late and Castro was victorious. Their excuse-it would not be right to intervene in a foreign country and it would draw unfavorable criticism. However, in 1954, it did intervene to effect the removal of Jacobo Arbenz from Guatamala.
The U.S. knew that Castro was not a communist. But he was opposed to the U.S. presence in Cuba, an attitude common among many Cubans. In spite of this, he was pragmatic and the differences that arose could have been resolved through negotiation. Instead, the U.S. was intransigent and drove him to the Soviets.
Many hostile activities followed. The Bay of Pigs invasion was attempted on the assumption that it would cause the Cubans to rebel against him. It failed. The planners did not seek the advice of those in the State Dept who correctly saw that he was popular with the people and he continued to have their support. It exploited the plight of those dissidents who escaped by boat; but many anti-communists who had languished in prison and were now allowed to leave Cuba were denied visas to enter the U.S. It lied about various supposedly hostile Cuban activities in Central America.
Smith returned to Havana in 1979 and described what he saw. There was no poverty and misery that exists in other Latin American countries. Everyone was provided with food, clothing, shelter, an education and medical care. I recently visited Cuba. It is over 20 years since he made that observation and an awful lot has happened in the interim. But I can attest that the same is true today.
This book was published in 1987 before the Soviet government, a prop for the Cuban economy, collapsed. With that collapse the Cuban economy went into a tail spin. Experts in government and the media predicted the immanent fall of Castro. But over a decade later, although the conditions in the country are quite onerous, he and his government survive.
It is ironic that with a hostile Goliath 90 miles away, he has survived for over four decades, while others whose military, economy and government were supported by the U.S. have been overthrown-the Shah of Iran, Marcos of the Philippines, Suharto of Indonesia, Mobutu of Zaire, Trujillo of the Dominican Republic, Somoza of Nicaragua, `Baby Doc' of Haiti.

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