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Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz epub ebook

by Sandra C. Taylor

Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz epub ebook

Author: Sandra C. Taylor
Category: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: University of California Press (October 22, 1993)
Pages: 343 pages
ISBN: 0520080041
ISBN13: 978-0520080041
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 815
Other formats: mbr doc rtf azw


histories of area Japanese Americans who were interned at Topaz, Jewel of the Desert is a thoughtful, nuanced narrative of the Utah internment. Sandra C. Taylor is Professor of History at the University of Utah.

Drawing on the records of the War Relocation Authority, the contemporary press, other studies of those American concentration camps, and nearly 50 oral histories of area Japanese Americans who were interned at Topaz, Jewel of the Desert is a thoughtful, nuanced narrative of the Utah internment.

This book tells the history of Japanese Americans of San Francisco and the Bay Area, and of their experiences of relocation and internment. Taylor first examines the lives of the Japanese Americans who settled in and around San Francisco near the end of the nineteenth century. As their numbers grew, so, too, did their sense of community.

Jewel of the Desert book. Taylor first examines the lives of the Japanese Americans who settled in and around San Francisco near the end of the nineteenth century

Jewel of the Desert book. Taylor looks particularly at how Japanese Americans kept their sense of community and self-worth alive in spite of the upheavals of internment.

This compelling book tells the history of Japanese Americans of San Francisco and the Bay Area, and of their experiences of relocation and internment

This compelling book tells the history of Japanese Americans of San Francisco and the Bay Area, and of their experiences of relocation and internment.

Taylor, Sandra C. (1993), Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz, Berkeley: University of California Press, ISBN 978-0520080041, OCLC 26364261. Uchida, Yoshiko (1971). New York: Scribner's Sons. Uchida, Yoshiko (1978).

Jewel of the desert: Japanese American internment at Topaz. Successful African American Men - From Childhood to Adulthood. Sandra Taylor Griffin. 7 Mb. 656 Kb. Handbook of African American Health: Social and Behavioral Interventions. Anthony J. Lemelle, Wornie Reed, Sandra Taylor.

Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz Sandra C. Taylor. by Lane R Hirabayashi. Re-reading the Archives: Intersections of Ethnography, Biography, and Autobiography in Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement.

Japanese American internment campsMap showing the extent of the exclusion zone and the locations of the internment camps for Japanese Americans

Japanese American internment campsMap showing the extent of the exclusion zone and the locations of the internment camps for Japanese Americans. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. Mochida family: ready for relocationThe Mochida family before their relocation to an internment camp for Japanese Americans; photograph by Dorothea Lange. National Archives, Washington, . After the attack on Pearl Harbor by Japanese aircraft on December 7, 1941, the . War Department suspected that Japanese Americans might act as saboteurs or espionage agents, despite a lack of hard evidence to support.

In the spring of 1942, under the guise of "military necessity," the U.S. government evacuated 110,000 Japanese Americans from their homes on the West Coast. About 7,000 people from the San Francisco Bay Area—the vast majority of whom were American citizens—were moved to an assembly center at Tanforan Racetrack and then to a concentration camp in Topaz, Utah. Dubbed the "jewel of the desert," the camp remained in operation until October 1945. This compelling book tells the history of Japanese Americans of San Francisco and the Bay Area, and of their experiences of relocation and internment.Sandra C. Taylor first examines the lives of the Japanese Americans who settled in and around San Francisco near the end of the nineteenth century. As their numbers grew, so, too, did their sense of community. They were a people bound together not only by common values, history, and institutions, but also by their shared status as outsiders. Taylor looks particularly at how Japanese Americans kept their sense of community and self-worth alive in spite of the upheavals of internment.The author draws on interviews with fifty former Topaz residents, and on the archives of the War Relocation Authority and newspaper reports, to show how relocation and its aftermath shaped the lives of these Japanese Americans. Written at a time when the United States once again regards Japan as a threat, Taylor's study testifies to the ongoing effects of prejudice toward Americans whose face is also the face of "the enemy."
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