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American Backlash: The Untold Story of Social Change in the United States epub ebook

by Michael Adams

American Backlash: The Untold Story of Social Change in the United States epub ebook

Author: Michael Adams
Category: Americas
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Global; 1st edition (April 25, 2007)
Pages: 240 pages
ISBN: 0670063703
ISBN13: 978-0670063703
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 284
Other formats: azw lit txt mobi


Michael Adams' American Backlash is the sort of non-fiction I like to read: it presents an atypical .

Michael Adams' American Backlash is the sort of non-fiction I like to read: it presents an atypical argument, it's fairly easy to read and it avoids unnecessary jargon. Unfortunately, the initial promise is never successfully met as the book unfolds. Environics is a respected polling company in Canada, and I think Adams does a good job of explaining the literally hundreds of values (and their questions) that were assessed from 1992 to 2004. On the other hand, the four quadrants that organize all of the responses on a two-dimensional grid (Authority vs. Individuality, and Survival vs. Fulfillment) are NOT well explained.

American Backlash book. American Backlash – book report If my lifespan was 500 years it still wouldn’t be enough to waste the time I spent giving Michael Adams, the socialist author, my time! I read 50 pages of politically correct juvenile crap and other than suffering through a sales job for Environics, I gained no real information. Even the cool-aid drinking public policy advisors painting the snowflake world would probable throw this book away. The book is not even sensible enough to be offensive – just a waste. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. American Backlash: The Untold Story Of Social Change In The United States. by. Michael Henry Adams

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Adams’s main claim is that the values divide between politically engaged Americans is. actually quite small compared to the chasm that divides them from those who are not. engaged-who do not vote.

Rather, it is politically disengaged Americans, people who increasingly embrace values of brash individualism and hedonism, who are the greatest barometer of where American society is headed. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

In his insightful, award-winning work Fire and Ice, Environics president Michael Adams explored the growing divergence between American and Canadian values. Will change the way you view America, for the better. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. Written by respected pollster Adams, this book is one of the most facinating I've ever read. Among the interesting findings is that Republicans and Democrats have much more in common values-wise than with non-voters.

The Untold History of the United States Электронная библиотека e-libra This book and the documentary film series it is based on challenge the basic narrative of .

The Untold History of the United States Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн The Untold History of the United States. Oliver Stone and Peter Kuznick THE UNTOLD HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES To our children-Tara, Michael, Sean, Lexie, Sara, and Asmara-and the better world that they and all children deserve. This book and the documentary film series it is based on challenge the basic narrative of . history that most Americans have been taught.

The Untold History of the United States (also known as Oliver Stone's Untold History of the United States) is a 2012 documentary series created, directed, produced.

The Untold History of the United States (also known as Oliver Stone's Untold History of the United States) is a 2012 documentary series created, directed, produced, and narrated by Oliver Stone about the reasons behind the Cold War, the decision to drop the atomic bombs, and changes in America's global role since the fall of Communism. Oliver Stone and historian Peter Kuznick (director of American University's Nuclear Studies Institute) began working on the project in 2008.

American Backlash: The Untold Story of Social Change in the United States (Michael Adams). Bury the Chains: The British Struggle to Abolish Slavery (Adam Hochschild). 7. American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer (Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin). 8. An Audience of Chairs (Joan Clark). 16. Collapse (Jared Diamond). 17. The Collapse of Globalism (John Ralston Saul). 18. Crack in the Edge of the World (Simon Winchester). 19. Curse of the Narrows (Laura MacDonald). 20. Dancing in the No-Fly Zone (Hadani Ditmars). 21. Don't Get Too Comfortable (David Rakoff).

In his insightful, award-winning work Fire and Ice, Environics president Michael Adams explored the growing divergence between American and Canadian values. Using the same mixture of polling and analysis in American Backlash, Adams fixes his penetrating gaze on contemporary America—the exceptional society. Exploding the accepted wisdom of an America divided bitterly into camps of red and blue, Adams's data show that the values rift between Republicans and Democrats is negligible when compared with the gulf between politically engaged citizens (of either party) and the nearly half of Americans who are politically disaffected. American Backlash goes beyond the red and blue dichotomy, beyond the litany of divisive political issues that receive so much attention in American public discourse: abortion, stem-cell research, euthanasia, same sex marriage, Darwin versus Genesis, and prayer in schools. Widening the lens to examine the psychology of American society as a whole, Adams's research suggests that it is neither Red nor Blue America that represents the overall trajectory of social change in the United States. Rather, it is politically disengaged Americans, people who increasingly embrace values of brash individualism and hedonism, who are the greatest barometer of where American society is headed.
Reviews (2)
Xtreem
Michael Adams' American Backlash is the sort of non-fiction I like to read: it presents an atypical argument, it's fairly easy to read and it avoids unnecessary jargon. Unfortunately, the initial promise is never successfully met as the book unfolds.

Adams' main point, or so it seems at the beginning, is that "there are, in fact, three kinds of people [in America]: Republicans, Democrats, and those who don't vote. The third group is the largest" (7). This gets your attention. You don't normally think about a three-way cultural split in America, and it's clear Adams is about to present a different kind of argument. He goes on to say, "The values of politically engaged Republicans and Democrats look virtually identical. It is between voters and non-voters that the real chasm lies" (ibid). In many ways it is the result of a generational shift: "America's youth are leading the country toward values of hard hedonism and unscrupulous individualism", whereas American voters (both Republican AND Democratic) are becoming more attracted to "order and authority". While the voters still define America's accepted definitions of the American Dream, they are diverging "from the net trajectory of social change in their country" (11). The new group - the politically disengaged - is increasingly interested in thrill-seeking and large social gatherings (from rock concerts to mega-churches). They are more sexist and xenophobic, and significantly more willing to accept violence and the doctrine of just deserts (part of what Adams calls Darwinism). Finally, this "third way" is much more oriented towards consumption and status seeking.

However, as I said before, the interesting elements of the opening chapters are not sustained. At a methodological level, I generally accept his social values research. Environics is a respected polling company in Canada, and I think Adams does a good job of explaining the literally hundreds of values (and their questions) that were assessed from 1992 to 2004. On the other hand, the four quadrants that organize all of the responses on a two-dimensional grid (Authority vs. Individuality, and Survival vs. Fulfillment) are NOT well explained. In fact, we have to go to an appendix to understand his choice of these four uber-values, and all we're told is that they're the "most explanatory and interesting dimensions when explicating our findings" (188). And that's about it for his explanation of their organizing powers. He does go to great lengths to explain these four values individually, but even then "Fulfillment" remains problematic. It represents the values of progressive Democrats, who score high on things like abstractions, idealism, tolerance, cosmopolitanism, community involvement and personal growth (a la Maslow). However, to me, "fulfillment" usually connotes the sort of crude materialism and hedonism of the opposite side (Survival). Moreover, if it's supposed to represent Democratic values, it is more intuitive for "Fulfillment" to be placed on the left than the right. So I find it irritating as a short-hand label. In the end, I accept his three-way split on values, but the macro-organization is confusing and just plain odd.

Another major shortcoming is that Adams' main point (the three-way split) is eventually abandoned. The second half of the book focuses largely on region and gender, and the differences between Democrats and Republicans. The hedonists largely disappear from view, and along with them a lot of my interest in the book. Indeed, by the end of the book, Adams spends most of his time comparing hard-core Democrats and Republicans. They DO have significant differences, and one is left to wonder about his earlier claim that "the values of politically engaged Republicans and Democrats look virtually identical". The worst chapter in my view is "The Great Backlash", which seems to be where Adams gets his title. It's an overview of the historical ascendancy of modern Republicans and the decline of progressive values. Unfortunately, it is riddled with clichés and shallow analysis, and Adams tends to direct most of his barbs at Democrats. I see little irony when Adams says that, "if the '60s hadn't provided enough evidence, the '70s were proof positive that America was veering seriously off track" (144). <Yawn>

The last major weakness, and the one most fatal for me, is Adams' refusal to see the close relationship between Republicans and the hedonistic anti-voters. In Chapter Two, where Adams compares the two types of voters to the non-voters, most of the issues placed in the 3-way charts are ones where social conservatives have, quite conveniently, clear and unique positions. But we see little comparison on economic issues, where modern economic conservatism affects a wider range of people. Economic conservatives (actually, old-fashioned liberals) follow the neo-classical economics of Milton Friedman et al.; their theories harken back to the 18th and 19th centuries, where belief in economic Darwinism was pervasive and wide-spread. And this is the problem: Republicans love this brand of unbridled capitalism, but so do the hedonist anti-voters. Thus, the new third group that Adams identifies is really the child of Republican economics. How parent and child relate to each other is something that Adams doesn't even consider.

Kazimi
Written by respected pollster Adams, this book is one of the most facinating I've ever read. Among the interesting findings is that Republicans and Democrats have much more in common values-wise than with non-voters. In fact, much of the things we 'hate' about the other side turn out to be values of non-voters, not of members of the other party. The best part of the book is the description of the different areas of the country and how their values are different and changing. Can't recommend enough.

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